Correlation Between Natural Killer Cell Activity and Treatment Effect in Patients with Disseminated Cancer

Torben Frøstrup Hansen, Line Nederby, Ahmed H Zedan, Inge Mejlholm, Jon R Henriksen, Karina Dahl Steffensen, Caroline B Thomsen, Louise Raunkilde, Lars Henrik Jensen, Anders Jakobsen

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Abstract

INTRODUCTION: The aim of the present study was to analyze the possible correlation between Natural Killer (NK) cell activity as measured by the NK Vue assay and treatment efficacy in patients with disseminated cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study included four trials encompassing palliative treatment, i.e. one trial on prostate- and ovarian cancer, respectively, and two trials on colorectal cancer. The current results are based on 93 patients with mature data on treatment effect. Blood samples were collected at baseline and prior to each treatment cycle into NK Vue. Following 24 hours of stimulation the level of interferon-gamma (IFNγ) in the plasma was measured as a surrogate for NK cell activity. RESULTS: The relationship between NK cell activity and treatment response was similar across tumor types and treatment. The IFNγ either remained at or dropped to an abnormal level (<200 pg/mL) during treatment in group 1 (n = 35). In group 2 (n = 30) the level remained within a normal range (>200 pg/mL), while in group 3 (n = 28) it increased from an abnormal to a normal level. The response rate was 14%, 47%, and 82%, respectively, P < .001. The median progression free survival was 2.6 months (95% confidence interval (CI) 2.1–3.9), 10.0 months (95% CI 6.5–11.1), and 8.3 months (95% CI 6.5–8.7), respectively, P < .001 (log-rank). CONCLUSION: Patients lacking the ability to mount an immune response during the first 2 months of treatment have a poor prognosis, and their clinical benefit of the treatment is questionable.

Original languageEnglish
JournalTranslational Oncology
Volume12
Issue number7
Pages (from-to)968-972
ISSN1936-5233
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2019

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Neoplasms
Confidence Intervals
Interferon-gamma
Palliative Care
Ovarian Neoplasms
Disease-Free Survival
Colorectal Neoplasms
Prostatic Neoplasms

Cite this

@article{8873cdbe917945dab73befc00e1e9dde,
title = "Correlation Between Natural Killer Cell Activity and Treatment Effect in Patients with Disseminated Cancer",
abstract = "INTRODUCTION: The aim of the present study was to analyze the possible correlation between Natural Killer (NK) cell activity as measured by the NK Vue assay and treatment efficacy in patients with disseminated cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study included four trials encompassing palliative treatment, i.e. one trial on prostate- and ovarian cancer, respectively, and two trials on colorectal cancer. The current results are based on 93 patients with mature data on treatment effect. Blood samples were collected at baseline and prior to each treatment cycle into NK Vue. Following 24 hours of stimulation the level of interferon-gamma (IFNγ) in the plasma was measured as a surrogate for NK cell activity. RESULTS: The relationship between NK cell activity and treatment response was similar across tumor types and treatment. The IFNγ either remained at or dropped to an abnormal level (<200 pg/mL) during treatment in group 1 (n = 35). In group 2 (n = 30) the level remained within a normal range (>200 pg/mL), while in group 3 (n = 28) it increased from an abnormal to a normal level. The response rate was 14{\%}, 47{\%}, and 82{\%}, respectively, P < .001. The median progression free survival was 2.6 months (95{\%} confidence interval (CI) 2.1–3.9), 10.0 months (95{\%} CI 6.5–11.1), and 8.3 months (95{\%} CI 6.5–8.7), respectively, P < .001 (log-rank). CONCLUSION: Patients lacking the ability to mount an immune response during the first 2 months of treatment have a poor prognosis, and their clinical benefit of the treatment is questionable.",
author = "Hansen, {Torben Fr{\o}strup} and Line Nederby and Zedan, {Ahmed H} and Inge Mejlholm and Henriksen, {Jon R} and {Dahl Steffensen}, Karina and Thomsen, {Caroline B} and Louise Raunkilde and Jensen, {Lars Henrik} and Anders Jakobsen",
note = "Copyright {\circledC} 2019 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.",
year = "2019",
month = "7",
doi = "10.1016/j.tranon.2019.04.002",
language = "English",
volume = "12",
pages = "968--972",
journal = "Translational Oncology",
issn = "1944-7124",
publisher = "Neoplasia Press",
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Correlation Between Natural Killer Cell Activity and Treatment Effect in Patients with Disseminated Cancer. / Hansen, Torben Frøstrup; Nederby, Line; Zedan, Ahmed H; Mejlholm, Inge; Henriksen, Jon R; Dahl Steffensen, Karina; Thomsen, Caroline B; Raunkilde, Louise; Jensen, Lars Henrik; Jakobsen, Anders.

In: Translational Oncology, Vol. 12, No. 7, 07.2019, p. 968-972.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Correlation Between Natural Killer Cell Activity and Treatment Effect in Patients with Disseminated Cancer

AU - Hansen, Torben Frøstrup

AU - Nederby, Line

AU - Zedan, Ahmed H

AU - Mejlholm, Inge

AU - Henriksen, Jon R

AU - Dahl Steffensen, Karina

AU - Thomsen, Caroline B

AU - Raunkilde, Louise

AU - Jensen, Lars Henrik

AU - Jakobsen, Anders

N1 - Copyright © 2019 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PY - 2019/7

Y1 - 2019/7

N2 - INTRODUCTION: The aim of the present study was to analyze the possible correlation between Natural Killer (NK) cell activity as measured by the NK Vue assay and treatment efficacy in patients with disseminated cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study included four trials encompassing palliative treatment, i.e. one trial on prostate- and ovarian cancer, respectively, and two trials on colorectal cancer. The current results are based on 93 patients with mature data on treatment effect. Blood samples were collected at baseline and prior to each treatment cycle into NK Vue. Following 24 hours of stimulation the level of interferon-gamma (IFNγ) in the plasma was measured as a surrogate for NK cell activity. RESULTS: The relationship between NK cell activity and treatment response was similar across tumor types and treatment. The IFNγ either remained at or dropped to an abnormal level (<200 pg/mL) during treatment in group 1 (n = 35). In group 2 (n = 30) the level remained within a normal range (>200 pg/mL), while in group 3 (n = 28) it increased from an abnormal to a normal level. The response rate was 14%, 47%, and 82%, respectively, P < .001. The median progression free survival was 2.6 months (95% confidence interval (CI) 2.1–3.9), 10.0 months (95% CI 6.5–11.1), and 8.3 months (95% CI 6.5–8.7), respectively, P < .001 (log-rank). CONCLUSION: Patients lacking the ability to mount an immune response during the first 2 months of treatment have a poor prognosis, and their clinical benefit of the treatment is questionable.

AB - INTRODUCTION: The aim of the present study was to analyze the possible correlation between Natural Killer (NK) cell activity as measured by the NK Vue assay and treatment efficacy in patients with disseminated cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study included four trials encompassing palliative treatment, i.e. one trial on prostate- and ovarian cancer, respectively, and two trials on colorectal cancer. The current results are based on 93 patients with mature data on treatment effect. Blood samples were collected at baseline and prior to each treatment cycle into NK Vue. Following 24 hours of stimulation the level of interferon-gamma (IFNγ) in the plasma was measured as a surrogate for NK cell activity. RESULTS: The relationship between NK cell activity and treatment response was similar across tumor types and treatment. The IFNγ either remained at or dropped to an abnormal level (<200 pg/mL) during treatment in group 1 (n = 35). In group 2 (n = 30) the level remained within a normal range (>200 pg/mL), while in group 3 (n = 28) it increased from an abnormal to a normal level. The response rate was 14%, 47%, and 82%, respectively, P < .001. The median progression free survival was 2.6 months (95% confidence interval (CI) 2.1–3.9), 10.0 months (95% CI 6.5–11.1), and 8.3 months (95% CI 6.5–8.7), respectively, P < .001 (log-rank). CONCLUSION: Patients lacking the ability to mount an immune response during the first 2 months of treatment have a poor prognosis, and their clinical benefit of the treatment is questionable.

U2 - 10.1016/j.tranon.2019.04.002

DO - 10.1016/j.tranon.2019.04.002

M3 - Journal article

VL - 12

SP - 968

EP - 972

JO - Translational Oncology

JF - Translational Oncology

SN - 1944-7124

IS - 7

ER -