Conversation or non-versation? Physicians’ communication about existential, spiritual and religious needs with chronically ill patients - protocol for a qualitative study

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Abstract

Background: Facing a severe, chronic disease can be experienced as an existential crisis that may lead to a lower quality of life and even risk of suicide. Existential, spiritual and religious ways of meaning-making are in many cases positively related to health and can be important in times of crises. This project aims to study a gap in the current knowledge with a specific focus on patient-centeredness as an attention to the whole person. How do physicians experience their patients’ existential, spiritual and religious needs in relation to chronic disease? How do they address these needs and are patients satisfied with this communication?
Methods / Design: Two chronic diseases with severe illness in common were chosen: Chronic Pain and Multiple Sclerosis. For each disease, an in-depth study of 12 patients and 4 physicians will precede the comparison of the cases resulting in 24 patient interviews and 8 physician interviews. Further, we will compare the existential, spiritual and religious needs of these 2 patient groups. Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis is applied as methodology and semi-structured interviews and observations are used as data generation methods.
Discussion: Investigating and addressing existential, spiritual and religious meaning in life in exchange with patients may enhance quality of care and improve efficacy of and satisfaction with treatment. The results of this project will hopefully provide a substantial contribution to the knowledge about existential, spiritual and religious needs of patients living with a chronic disease. The knowledge may be used in clinical practice as well as for educational purposes.
Original languageEnglish
JournalEuropean Journal for Person Centered Healthcare
Volume7
Issue number2
Pages (from-to)377-385
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Cite this

@article{9707a165bace4a2999c13458ea4b31b3,
title = "Conversation or non-versation? Physicians’ communication about existential, spiritual and religious needs with chronically ill patients - protocol for a qualitative study",
abstract = "Background: Facing a severe, chronic disease can be experienced as an existential crisis that may lead to a lower quality of life and even risk of suicide. Existential, spiritual and religious ways of meaning-making are in many cases positively related to health and can be important in times of crises. This project aims to study a gap in the current knowledge with a specific focus on patient-centeredness as an attention to the whole person. How do physicians experience their patients’ existential, spiritual and religious needs in relation to chronic disease? How do they address these needs and are patients satisfied with this communication?Methods / Design: Two chronic diseases with severe illness in common were chosen: Chronic Pain and Multiple Sclerosis. For each disease, an in-depth study of 12 patients and 4 physicians will precede the comparison of the cases resulting in 24 patient interviews and 8 physician interviews. Further, we will compare the existential, spiritual and religious needs of these 2 patient groups. Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis is applied as methodology and semi-structured interviews and observations are used as data generation methods.Discussion: Investigating and addressing existential, spiritual and religious meaning in life in exchange with patients may enhance quality of care and improve efficacy of and satisfaction with treatment. The results of this project will hopefully provide a substantial contribution to the knowledge about existential, spiritual and religious needs of patients living with a chronic disease. The knowledge may be used in clinical practice as well as for educational purposes.",
keywords = "Barriers, chronic illness, chronic pain, doctor-patient-communication, existential, existential communication, multiple sclerosis, patient satisfaction, person-centered healthcare, qualitative methods, spiritual and religious needs",
author = "Andersen, {Aida Hougaard} and {Assing Hvidt}, Elisabeth and Hvidt, {Niels Christian} and Zsolt Ill{\'e}s and Gitte Handberg and Roessler, {Kirsten Kaya}",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.5750/ejpch.v7i2.1715",
language = "English",
volume = "7",
pages = "377--385",
journal = "European Journal for Person Centered Healthcare",
issn = "2052-5656",
publisher = "University of Buckingham Press",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Conversation or non-versation? Physicians’ communication about existential, spiritual and religious needs with chronically ill patients - protocol for a qualitative study

AU - Andersen, Aida Hougaard

AU - Assing Hvidt, Elisabeth

AU - Hvidt, Niels Christian

AU - Illés, Zsolt

AU - Handberg, Gitte

AU - Roessler, Kirsten Kaya

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Background: Facing a severe, chronic disease can be experienced as an existential crisis that may lead to a lower quality of life and even risk of suicide. Existential, spiritual and religious ways of meaning-making are in many cases positively related to health and can be important in times of crises. This project aims to study a gap in the current knowledge with a specific focus on patient-centeredness as an attention to the whole person. How do physicians experience their patients’ existential, spiritual and religious needs in relation to chronic disease? How do they address these needs and are patients satisfied with this communication?Methods / Design: Two chronic diseases with severe illness in common were chosen: Chronic Pain and Multiple Sclerosis. For each disease, an in-depth study of 12 patients and 4 physicians will precede the comparison of the cases resulting in 24 patient interviews and 8 physician interviews. Further, we will compare the existential, spiritual and religious needs of these 2 patient groups. Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis is applied as methodology and semi-structured interviews and observations are used as data generation methods.Discussion: Investigating and addressing existential, spiritual and religious meaning in life in exchange with patients may enhance quality of care and improve efficacy of and satisfaction with treatment. The results of this project will hopefully provide a substantial contribution to the knowledge about existential, spiritual and religious needs of patients living with a chronic disease. The knowledge may be used in clinical practice as well as for educational purposes.

AB - Background: Facing a severe, chronic disease can be experienced as an existential crisis that may lead to a lower quality of life and even risk of suicide. Existential, spiritual and religious ways of meaning-making are in many cases positively related to health and can be important in times of crises. This project aims to study a gap in the current knowledge with a specific focus on patient-centeredness as an attention to the whole person. How do physicians experience their patients’ existential, spiritual and religious needs in relation to chronic disease? How do they address these needs and are patients satisfied with this communication?Methods / Design: Two chronic diseases with severe illness in common were chosen: Chronic Pain and Multiple Sclerosis. For each disease, an in-depth study of 12 patients and 4 physicians will precede the comparison of the cases resulting in 24 patient interviews and 8 physician interviews. Further, we will compare the existential, spiritual and religious needs of these 2 patient groups. Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis is applied as methodology and semi-structured interviews and observations are used as data generation methods.Discussion: Investigating and addressing existential, spiritual and religious meaning in life in exchange with patients may enhance quality of care and improve efficacy of and satisfaction with treatment. The results of this project will hopefully provide a substantial contribution to the knowledge about existential, spiritual and religious needs of patients living with a chronic disease. The knowledge may be used in clinical practice as well as for educational purposes.

KW - Barriers, chronic illness, chronic pain, doctor-patient-communication, existential, existential communication, multiple sclerosis, patient satisfaction, person-centered healthcare, qualitative methods, spiritual and religious needs

U2 - 10.5750/ejpch.v7i2.1715

DO - 10.5750/ejpch.v7i2.1715

M3 - Journal article

VL - 7

SP - 377

EP - 385

JO - European Journal for Person Centered Healthcare

JF - European Journal for Person Centered Healthcare

SN - 2052-5656

IS - 2

ER -