Commentary: Obstetric oxytocin exposure and risk of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and autism spectrum disorder in offspring-case closed

Daniel R. Morales*, Hedvig M. Nordeng

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debateResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Synthetic oxytocin has been used in clinical practice for over 40 years to prevent maternal and perinatal mortality and morbidity. It is indicated for the augmentation and induction of labour in the antenatal setting, and for the prevention and treatment of uterine atony and haemorrhage in the postpartum setting.1 Endogenous oxytocin is involved in the regulation of stress, anxiety, social cognition and behaviours in humans. For years individuals have been debating whether oxytocin has potential harmful effects on child neurodevelopment, either directly by disrupting the oxytocinergic system or indirectly through uterine hyperstimulation and neonatal distress and hypoxia.2 Animal and in vitro studies give some support to these theories....
Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Journal of Epidemiology
Volume50
Issue number2
Pages (from-to)457-458
ISSN0300-5771
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2021

Keywords

  • Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity/chemically induced
  • Autism Spectrum Disorder/chemically induced
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Oxytocin/adverse effects
  • Pregnancy

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