Colonic Epithelial Surfactant Protein D Expression Correlates with Inflammation in Clinical Colonic Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

AB Nexoe, B Pilecki, Sebastian von Huth, S Husby, AA Pedersen, S Detlefsen, N Marcussen, JB Moeller, U Holmskov, GL Sorensen*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Background: Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are chronic disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is expressed in the intestinal epithelium and is essential for innate host defense and regulation of inflammatory responses. Genetic variations of SP-D are associated with IBD, but the effects of SP-D in clinical disease development have not been clarified. We hypothesized that colonic epithelial SP-D expression is increased in parallel with intestinal inflammation with the capacity to dampen deleterious effects.

Methods: Surgical specimens from IBD patients including Crohn's disease (n = 9) and ulcerative colitis (n = 18) were scored for expression of SP-D and inflammatory activity. Cohoused Sftpd+/+ and Sftpd-/- mouse littermates were subjected to dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) for 7 days to induce colitis. Colonic tissue was scored for histologic damage and analyzed for inflammatory markers and expression of SP-D.

Results: Surgical specimens from IBD patients showed a strong positive correlation between immunoscore for SP-D and inflammatory activity (R2 = 0.78, P < 0.0001). In mice, colonic epithelial SP-D expression was very low, and DSS-induced colitis was unaffected by SP-D deficiency, although DSS induced transcription of colonic SP-D to a mild degree.

Conclusions: A strong positive correlation between inflammatory activity and epithelial expression of SP-D was observed in surgical specimens from IBD patients supporting a role for SP-D in clinical disease. The in vivo study was inconclusive due to very low intestinal SP-D expression in the mouse. Further studies are warranted to support that increased SP-D expression in the human colonic epithelium is protective against intestinal inflammation.

Original languageEnglish
JournalInflammatory Bowel Diseases
Volume25
Issue number8
Pages (from-to)1349-1356
ISSN1078-0998
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 17. Jul 2019

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Pulmonary Surfactant-Associated Protein D
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
Dextran Sulfate
Colitis
Protein Deficiency
Intestinal Mucosa

Keywords

  • colitis
  • inflammatory bowel diseases
  • surfactant protein D

Cite this

@article{bc3abbe73a7647aaab960a1d6c1c7fa4,
title = "Colonic Epithelial Surfactant Protein D Expression Correlates with Inflammation in Clinical Colonic Inflammatory Bowel Disease.",
abstract = "Background: Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are chronic disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is expressed in the intestinal epithelium and is essential for innate host defense and regulation of inflammatory responses. Genetic variations of SP-D are associated with IBD, but the effects of SP-D in clinical disease development have not been clarified. We hypothesized that colonic epithelial SP-D expression is increased in parallel with intestinal inflammation with the capacity to dampen deleterious effects.Methods: Surgical specimens from IBD patients including Crohn's disease (n = 9) and ulcerative colitis (n = 18) were scored for expression of SP-D and inflammatory activity. Cohoused Sftpd+/+ and Sftpd-/- mouse littermates were subjected to dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) for 7 days to induce colitis. Colonic tissue was scored for histologic damage and analyzed for inflammatory markers and expression of SP-D.Results: Surgical specimens from IBD patients showed a strong positive correlation between immunoscore for SP-D and inflammatory activity (R2 = 0.78, P < 0.0001). In mice, colonic epithelial SP-D expression was very low, and DSS-induced colitis was unaffected by SP-D deficiency, although DSS induced transcription of colonic SP-D to a mild degree.Conclusions: A strong positive correlation between inflammatory activity and epithelial expression of SP-D was observed in surgical specimens from IBD patients supporting a role for SP-D in clinical disease. The in vivo study was inconclusive due to very low intestinal SP-D expression in the mouse. Further studies are warranted to support that increased SP-D expression in the human colonic epithelium is protective against intestinal inflammation.",
keywords = "colitis, inflammatory bowel diseases, surfactant protein D",
author = "AB Nexoe and B Pilecki and {von Huth}, Sebastian and S Husby and AA Pedersen and S Detlefsen and N Marcussen and JB Moeller and U Holmskov and GL Sorensen",
year = "2019",
month = "7",
day = "17",
doi = "10.1093/ibd/izz009",
language = "English",
volume = "25",
pages = "1349--1356",
journal = "Inflammatory Bowel Diseases",
issn = "1078-0998",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams & Wilkins",
number = "8",

}

Colonic Epithelial Surfactant Protein D Expression Correlates with Inflammation in Clinical Colonic Inflammatory Bowel Disease. / Nexoe, AB; Pilecki, B; von Huth, Sebastian; Husby, S; Pedersen, AA; Detlefsen, S; Marcussen, N; Moeller, JB; Holmskov, U; Sorensen, GL.

In: Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, Vol. 25, No. 8, 17.07.2019, p. 1349-1356.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Colonic Epithelial Surfactant Protein D Expression Correlates with Inflammation in Clinical Colonic Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

AU - Nexoe, AB

AU - Pilecki, B

AU - von Huth, Sebastian

AU - Husby, S

AU - Pedersen, AA

AU - Detlefsen, S

AU - Marcussen, N

AU - Moeller, JB

AU - Holmskov, U

AU - Sorensen, GL

PY - 2019/7/17

Y1 - 2019/7/17

N2 - Background: Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are chronic disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is expressed in the intestinal epithelium and is essential for innate host defense and regulation of inflammatory responses. Genetic variations of SP-D are associated with IBD, but the effects of SP-D in clinical disease development have not been clarified. We hypothesized that colonic epithelial SP-D expression is increased in parallel with intestinal inflammation with the capacity to dampen deleterious effects.Methods: Surgical specimens from IBD patients including Crohn's disease (n = 9) and ulcerative colitis (n = 18) were scored for expression of SP-D and inflammatory activity. Cohoused Sftpd+/+ and Sftpd-/- mouse littermates were subjected to dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) for 7 days to induce colitis. Colonic tissue was scored for histologic damage and analyzed for inflammatory markers and expression of SP-D.Results: Surgical specimens from IBD patients showed a strong positive correlation between immunoscore for SP-D and inflammatory activity (R2 = 0.78, P < 0.0001). In mice, colonic epithelial SP-D expression was very low, and DSS-induced colitis was unaffected by SP-D deficiency, although DSS induced transcription of colonic SP-D to a mild degree.Conclusions: A strong positive correlation between inflammatory activity and epithelial expression of SP-D was observed in surgical specimens from IBD patients supporting a role for SP-D in clinical disease. The in vivo study was inconclusive due to very low intestinal SP-D expression in the mouse. Further studies are warranted to support that increased SP-D expression in the human colonic epithelium is protective against intestinal inflammation.

AB - Background: Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are chronic disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is expressed in the intestinal epithelium and is essential for innate host defense and regulation of inflammatory responses. Genetic variations of SP-D are associated with IBD, but the effects of SP-D in clinical disease development have not been clarified. We hypothesized that colonic epithelial SP-D expression is increased in parallel with intestinal inflammation with the capacity to dampen deleterious effects.Methods: Surgical specimens from IBD patients including Crohn's disease (n = 9) and ulcerative colitis (n = 18) were scored for expression of SP-D and inflammatory activity. Cohoused Sftpd+/+ and Sftpd-/- mouse littermates were subjected to dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) for 7 days to induce colitis. Colonic tissue was scored for histologic damage and analyzed for inflammatory markers and expression of SP-D.Results: Surgical specimens from IBD patients showed a strong positive correlation between immunoscore for SP-D and inflammatory activity (R2 = 0.78, P < 0.0001). In mice, colonic epithelial SP-D expression was very low, and DSS-induced colitis was unaffected by SP-D deficiency, although DSS induced transcription of colonic SP-D to a mild degree.Conclusions: A strong positive correlation between inflammatory activity and epithelial expression of SP-D was observed in surgical specimens from IBD patients supporting a role for SP-D in clinical disease. The in vivo study was inconclusive due to very low intestinal SP-D expression in the mouse. Further studies are warranted to support that increased SP-D expression in the human colonic epithelium is protective against intestinal inflammation.

KW - colitis

KW - inflammatory bowel diseases

KW - surfactant protein D

U2 - 10.1093/ibd/izz009

DO - 10.1093/ibd/izz009

M3 - Journal article

VL - 25

SP - 1349

EP - 1356

JO - Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

JF - Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

SN - 1078-0998

IS - 8

ER -