Choice probability for apple juice based on novel processing techniques: Investigating the choice relevance of mean-end-chains

Nina Veflen Olsen, E. Menichelli, Klaus G. Grunert, Anne-Mette Sonne, Erzsébet Szabó, Diána Bánáti, T. Næs

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The main aim of this study is to investigate an old challenge for means-end chain (MEC) theory; the lack of demonstration for means-end chains choice relevance. Even though MEC has become a commonly used tool in commercial market research and has been widely used in applied consumer research, within
the core of academic consumer research, MEC has been almost ignored. One plausible explanation for this lack of interest may be that studies linking MEC data to choice have been few. In this study, we are to investigate how values and consequences generated from a previous MEC study structure can be linked
to likelihood of choice. Hypotheses about European consumers’ likelihood of choice for novel processed juice are stated and tested in a rating based conjoint study in Norway, Denmark, Hungary and Slovakia. In the study, consumers
probability of choice for high pressure processed (HPP) juice and pulsed electric field (PEF) juice are compared with their probability of choice for pasteurized juice and freshly produced apple juice, and consumer choices are tried explained by values and consequences generated from a MEC study. The study
support, at least partly, that means-end chain structures’ have choice relevance.
Original languageEnglish
JournalFood Quality and Preference
Volume22
Issue number1
Pages (from-to)48-59
ISSN0950-3293
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Choice probability for apple juice based on novel processing techniques: Investigating the choice relevance of mean-end-chains'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this