Children's GPS-determined versus self-reported transport in leisure time and associations with parental perceptions of the neighborhood environment

Griet Vanwolleghem, Jasper Schipperijn, Freja Gheysen, Greet Cardon, Ilse De Bourdeaudhuij, Delfien Van Dyck

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: This study aimed to examine both GPS-determined and self-reported walking, cycling and passive transport in leisure time during week- and weekend-days among 10 to 12-year old children. Comparisons between GPS-determined and self-reported transport in leisure time were investigated. Second, associations between parental perceptions of the neighborhood environment and GPS-determined walking, cycling and passive transport in leisure time were studied.

METHODS: Children (10 to 12-years old; n = 126) wore a GPS device and an accelerometer for 7 consecutive days to assess objectively measured transport in leisure time and filled out a diary to assess self-reported transport in leisure time. Parents completed a questionnaire to assess parental perceptions of the neighborhood environment. Pearson correlations and t-tests were used to test for concurrent validity and differences between GPS-determined and self-reported transport in leisure time. Generalized linear models were used to determine the associations between the parental perceptions of the neighborhood environment and GPS-determined transport in leisure time.

RESULTS: Overall, children under-reported their walking and cycling in leisure time, compared to GPS-determined measures (all p values <0.001). However, children reported their passive transport in leisure time during weekend days quite accurate. GPS-determined measures revealed that children walked most during weekdays (M = 3.96 trips/day; 26.10 min/day) and used passive transport more frequently during weekend days (M = 2.12 trips/day; 31.39 min/day). Only a few parental perceived environmental attributes of the neighborhood (i.e. residential density, land use mix access, quality and availability of walking and cycling facilities, and aesthetics) were significantly associated with children's GPS-determined walking, cycling or passive transport in leisure time.

CONCLUSIONS: To accurately assess children's active transport in leisure time, GPS measures are recommended over self-reports. More research using GPS with a focus on children's transport in leisure time and investigating the associations with parental perceptions of the neighborhood environment is needed to confirm the results of the present study.

Original languageEnglish
Article number16
JournalInternational Journal of Health Geographics
Volume15
Issue number1
Number of pages12
ISSN1476-072X
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

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Leisure Activities
Global positioning system
Leisure time
Accelerometers
Land use
Self Report
Linear Models
Wear of materials
Availability
Parents

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@article{392975748203498fa66f68f7f21c1cda,
title = "Children's GPS-determined versus self-reported transport in leisure time and associations with parental perceptions of the neighborhood environment",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: This study aimed to examine both GPS-determined and self-reported walking, cycling and passive transport in leisure time during week- and weekend-days among 10 to 12-year old children. Comparisons between GPS-determined and self-reported transport in leisure time were investigated. Second, associations between parental perceptions of the neighborhood environment and GPS-determined walking, cycling and passive transport in leisure time were studied.METHODS: Children (10 to 12-years old; n = 126) wore a GPS device and an accelerometer for 7 consecutive days to assess objectively measured transport in leisure time and filled out a diary to assess self-reported transport in leisure time. Parents completed a questionnaire to assess parental perceptions of the neighborhood environment. Pearson correlations and t-tests were used to test for concurrent validity and differences between GPS-determined and self-reported transport in leisure time. Generalized linear models were used to determine the associations between the parental perceptions of the neighborhood environment and GPS-determined transport in leisure time.RESULTS: Overall, children under-reported their walking and cycling in leisure time, compared to GPS-determined measures (all p values <0.001). However, children reported their passive transport in leisure time during weekend days quite accurate. GPS-determined measures revealed that children walked most during weekdays (M = 3.96 trips/day; 26.10 min/day) and used passive transport more frequently during weekend days (M = 2.12 trips/day; 31.39 min/day). Only a few parental perceived environmental attributes of the neighborhood (i.e. residential density, land use mix access, quality and availability of walking and cycling facilities, and aesthetics) were significantly associated with children's GPS-determined walking, cycling or passive transport in leisure time.CONCLUSIONS: To accurately assess children's active transport in leisure time, GPS measures are recommended over self-reports. More research using GPS with a focus on children's transport in leisure time and investigating the associations with parental perceptions of the neighborhood environment is needed to confirm the results of the present study.",
author = "Griet Vanwolleghem and Jasper Schipperijn and Freja Gheysen and Greet Cardon and {De Bourdeaudhuij}, Ilse and {Van Dyck}, Delfien",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.1186/s12942-016-0045-9",
language = "English",
volume = "15",
journal = "International Journal of Health Geographics",
issn = "1476-072X",
publisher = "BioMed Central",
number = "1",

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Children's GPS-determined versus self-reported transport in leisure time and associations with parental perceptions of the neighborhood environment. / Vanwolleghem, Griet; Schipperijn, Jasper; Gheysen, Freja; Cardon, Greet; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Van Dyck, Delfien.

In: International Journal of Health Geographics, Vol. 15, No. 1, 16, 2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Children's GPS-determined versus self-reported transport in leisure time and associations with parental perceptions of the neighborhood environment

AU - Vanwolleghem, Griet

AU - Schipperijn, Jasper

AU - Gheysen, Freja

AU - Cardon, Greet

AU - De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse

AU - Van Dyck, Delfien

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - BACKGROUND: This study aimed to examine both GPS-determined and self-reported walking, cycling and passive transport in leisure time during week- and weekend-days among 10 to 12-year old children. Comparisons between GPS-determined and self-reported transport in leisure time were investigated. Second, associations between parental perceptions of the neighborhood environment and GPS-determined walking, cycling and passive transport in leisure time were studied.METHODS: Children (10 to 12-years old; n = 126) wore a GPS device and an accelerometer for 7 consecutive days to assess objectively measured transport in leisure time and filled out a diary to assess self-reported transport in leisure time. Parents completed a questionnaire to assess parental perceptions of the neighborhood environment. Pearson correlations and t-tests were used to test for concurrent validity and differences between GPS-determined and self-reported transport in leisure time. Generalized linear models were used to determine the associations between the parental perceptions of the neighborhood environment and GPS-determined transport in leisure time.RESULTS: Overall, children under-reported their walking and cycling in leisure time, compared to GPS-determined measures (all p values <0.001). However, children reported their passive transport in leisure time during weekend days quite accurate. GPS-determined measures revealed that children walked most during weekdays (M = 3.96 trips/day; 26.10 min/day) and used passive transport more frequently during weekend days (M = 2.12 trips/day; 31.39 min/day). Only a few parental perceived environmental attributes of the neighborhood (i.e. residential density, land use mix access, quality and availability of walking and cycling facilities, and aesthetics) were significantly associated with children's GPS-determined walking, cycling or passive transport in leisure time.CONCLUSIONS: To accurately assess children's active transport in leisure time, GPS measures are recommended over self-reports. More research using GPS with a focus on children's transport in leisure time and investigating the associations with parental perceptions of the neighborhood environment is needed to confirm the results of the present study.

AB - BACKGROUND: This study aimed to examine both GPS-determined and self-reported walking, cycling and passive transport in leisure time during week- and weekend-days among 10 to 12-year old children. Comparisons between GPS-determined and self-reported transport in leisure time were investigated. Second, associations between parental perceptions of the neighborhood environment and GPS-determined walking, cycling and passive transport in leisure time were studied.METHODS: Children (10 to 12-years old; n = 126) wore a GPS device and an accelerometer for 7 consecutive days to assess objectively measured transport in leisure time and filled out a diary to assess self-reported transport in leisure time. Parents completed a questionnaire to assess parental perceptions of the neighborhood environment. Pearson correlations and t-tests were used to test for concurrent validity and differences between GPS-determined and self-reported transport in leisure time. Generalized linear models were used to determine the associations between the parental perceptions of the neighborhood environment and GPS-determined transport in leisure time.RESULTS: Overall, children under-reported their walking and cycling in leisure time, compared to GPS-determined measures (all p values <0.001). However, children reported their passive transport in leisure time during weekend days quite accurate. GPS-determined measures revealed that children walked most during weekdays (M = 3.96 trips/day; 26.10 min/day) and used passive transport more frequently during weekend days (M = 2.12 trips/day; 31.39 min/day). Only a few parental perceived environmental attributes of the neighborhood (i.e. residential density, land use mix access, quality and availability of walking and cycling facilities, and aesthetics) were significantly associated with children's GPS-determined walking, cycling or passive transport in leisure time.CONCLUSIONS: To accurately assess children's active transport in leisure time, GPS measures are recommended over self-reports. More research using GPS with a focus on children's transport in leisure time and investigating the associations with parental perceptions of the neighborhood environment is needed to confirm the results of the present study.

U2 - 10.1186/s12942-016-0045-9

DO - 10.1186/s12942-016-0045-9

M3 - Journal article

VL - 15

JO - International Journal of Health Geographics

JF - International Journal of Health Geographics

SN - 1476-072X

IS - 1

M1 - 16

ER -