Cessation of smoking after first-ever stroke: A follow-up study

Søren Bak, Søren Hein Sindrup, Torben Alslev, Ole Kristensen, Kaare Christensen, David Gaist

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Cessation of smoking is widely recommended in patients with stroke to reduce the risk of myocardial infarction and recurrent stroke, but little is known regarding how patients modify their smoking habits after a stroke. We used data from a prospective follow-up study to assess modification of smoking habits and to identify predictors of persistent smoking after first-ever stroke. METHODS: All patients admitted to the only neurology department of Funen County (465 000 inhabitants) with first-ever stroke from August 1, 1999, to January 31, 2001, were prospectively identified. A comprehensive structured interview was completed both during hospitalization and at 6-month follow-up. The interview comprised questions on education, occupation, marital status, lifestyle, concomitant diseases, and functional disability. We estimated the relative risk of persistent smoking at follow-up using unconditional logistic regression. RESULTS: We identified 734 patients with a first-ever stroke in the study period. One hundred three patients (14%) died in the 6-month period after their admission. A total of 511 patients (81%) who participated in the interview both on admission and at follow-up were included in the present study. Among 198 patients (38.7%) who were current smokers on admission, 43 patients (21.7%) gave up smoking within 6 months of suffering a stroke. Sex, functional status, and sociodemographic characteristics were independently associated with persistent smoking. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that more efficient antismoking counseling is required to reduce the proportion of persistent smokers after stroke. This counseling should take into account the increased risk of persistent smoking in men, patients with no disability, blue-collar workers, and patients living alone.
Original languageEnglish
JournalStroke
Volume33
Issue number9
Pages (from-to)2263-2269
ISSN0039-2499
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002

Fingerprint

Smoking Cessation
Smoking
Interviews
Habits
Counseling
Patient Admission
Marital Status
Neurology
Occupations
Logistic Models
Education

Keywords

  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Comorbidity
  • Denmark
  • Female
  • Follow-Up Studies
  • Humans
  • Interviews as Topic
  • Life Style
  • Logistic Models
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Odds Ratio
  • Prospective Studies
  • Registries
  • Risk
  • Severity of Illness Index
  • Smoking
  • Smoking Cessation
  • Stroke

Cite this

Bak, Søren ; Sindrup, Søren Hein ; Alslev, Torben ; Kristensen, Ole ; Christensen, Kaare ; Gaist, David. / Cessation of smoking after first-ever stroke : A follow-up study. In: Stroke. 2002 ; Vol. 33, No. 9. pp. 2263-2269.
@article{528235a0ba9911dc9626000ea68e967b,
title = "Cessation of smoking after first-ever stroke: A follow-up study",
abstract = "BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Cessation of smoking is widely recommended in patients with stroke to reduce the risk of myocardial infarction and recurrent stroke, but little is known regarding how patients modify their smoking habits after a stroke. We used data from a prospective follow-up study to assess modification of smoking habits and to identify predictors of persistent smoking after first-ever stroke. METHODS: All patients admitted to the only neurology department of Funen County (465 000 inhabitants) with first-ever stroke from August 1, 1999, to January 31, 2001, were prospectively identified. A comprehensive structured interview was completed both during hospitalization and at 6-month follow-up. The interview comprised questions on education, occupation, marital status, lifestyle, concomitant diseases, and functional disability. We estimated the relative risk of persistent smoking at follow-up using unconditional logistic regression. RESULTS: We identified 734 patients with a first-ever stroke in the study period. One hundred three patients (14{\%}) died in the 6-month period after their admission. A total of 511 patients (81{\%}) who participated in the interview both on admission and at follow-up were included in the present study. Among 198 patients (38.7{\%}) who were current smokers on admission, 43 patients (21.7{\%}) gave up smoking within 6 months of suffering a stroke. Sex, functional status, and sociodemographic characteristics were independently associated with persistent smoking. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that more efficient antismoking counseling is required to reduce the proportion of persistent smokers after stroke. This counseling should take into account the increased risk of persistent smoking in men, patients with no disability, blue-collar workers, and patients living alone.",
keywords = "Adult, Aged, Comorbidity, Denmark, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Interviews as Topic, Life Style, Logistic Models, Male, Middle Aged, Odds Ratio, Prospective Studies, Registries, Risk, Severity of Illness Index, Smoking, Smoking Cessation, Stroke",
author = "S{\o}ren Bak and Sindrup, {S{\o}ren Hein} and Torben Alslev and Ole Kristensen and Kaare Christensen and David Gaist",
year = "2002",
doi = "10.1161/01.STR.0000027210.50936.D0",
language = "English",
volume = "33",
pages = "2263--2269",
journal = "Stroke",
issn = "0039-2499",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams & Wilkins",
number = "9",

}

Cessation of smoking after first-ever stroke : A follow-up study. / Bak, Søren; Sindrup, Søren Hein; Alslev, Torben; Kristensen, Ole; Christensen, Kaare; Gaist, David.

In: Stroke, Vol. 33, No. 9, 2002, p. 2263-2269.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cessation of smoking after first-ever stroke

T2 - A follow-up study

AU - Bak, Søren

AU - Sindrup, Søren Hein

AU - Alslev, Torben

AU - Kristensen, Ole

AU - Christensen, Kaare

AU - Gaist, David

PY - 2002

Y1 - 2002

N2 - BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Cessation of smoking is widely recommended in patients with stroke to reduce the risk of myocardial infarction and recurrent stroke, but little is known regarding how patients modify their smoking habits after a stroke. We used data from a prospective follow-up study to assess modification of smoking habits and to identify predictors of persistent smoking after first-ever stroke. METHODS: All patients admitted to the only neurology department of Funen County (465 000 inhabitants) with first-ever stroke from August 1, 1999, to January 31, 2001, were prospectively identified. A comprehensive structured interview was completed both during hospitalization and at 6-month follow-up. The interview comprised questions on education, occupation, marital status, lifestyle, concomitant diseases, and functional disability. We estimated the relative risk of persistent smoking at follow-up using unconditional logistic regression. RESULTS: We identified 734 patients with a first-ever stroke in the study period. One hundred three patients (14%) died in the 6-month period after their admission. A total of 511 patients (81%) who participated in the interview both on admission and at follow-up were included in the present study. Among 198 patients (38.7%) who were current smokers on admission, 43 patients (21.7%) gave up smoking within 6 months of suffering a stroke. Sex, functional status, and sociodemographic characteristics were independently associated with persistent smoking. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that more efficient antismoking counseling is required to reduce the proportion of persistent smokers after stroke. This counseling should take into account the increased risk of persistent smoking in men, patients with no disability, blue-collar workers, and patients living alone.

AB - BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Cessation of smoking is widely recommended in patients with stroke to reduce the risk of myocardial infarction and recurrent stroke, but little is known regarding how patients modify their smoking habits after a stroke. We used data from a prospective follow-up study to assess modification of smoking habits and to identify predictors of persistent smoking after first-ever stroke. METHODS: All patients admitted to the only neurology department of Funen County (465 000 inhabitants) with first-ever stroke from August 1, 1999, to January 31, 2001, were prospectively identified. A comprehensive structured interview was completed both during hospitalization and at 6-month follow-up. The interview comprised questions on education, occupation, marital status, lifestyle, concomitant diseases, and functional disability. We estimated the relative risk of persistent smoking at follow-up using unconditional logistic regression. RESULTS: We identified 734 patients with a first-ever stroke in the study period. One hundred three patients (14%) died in the 6-month period after their admission. A total of 511 patients (81%) who participated in the interview both on admission and at follow-up were included in the present study. Among 198 patients (38.7%) who were current smokers on admission, 43 patients (21.7%) gave up smoking within 6 months of suffering a stroke. Sex, functional status, and sociodemographic characteristics were independently associated with persistent smoking. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that more efficient antismoking counseling is required to reduce the proportion of persistent smokers after stroke. This counseling should take into account the increased risk of persistent smoking in men, patients with no disability, blue-collar workers, and patients living alone.

KW - Adult

KW - Aged

KW - Comorbidity

KW - Denmark

KW - Female

KW - Follow-Up Studies

KW - Humans

KW - Interviews as Topic

KW - Life Style

KW - Logistic Models

KW - Male

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Odds Ratio

KW - Prospective Studies

KW - Registries

KW - Risk

KW - Severity of Illness Index

KW - Smoking

KW - Smoking Cessation

KW - Stroke

U2 - 10.1161/01.STR.0000027210.50936.D0

DO - 10.1161/01.STR.0000027210.50936.D0

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 12215597

VL - 33

SP - 2263

EP - 2269

JO - Stroke

JF - Stroke

SN - 0039-2499

IS - 9

ER -