Cancer and venous thromboembolism: a multidisciplinary approach

Henrik T Sørensen, Søren P Johnsen, Bente Nørgård, Leo R Zacharski, John A Baron

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

In this paper, we briefly review the relation between cancer and venous thromboembolism (VTE), an association that has been recognized for more than a century. In particular we focus on VTE as predictor and prognostic factor for cancer and the antineoplastic potential of antithrombotic treatment. Cancer may cause disturbances in the haemostatic system by numerous mechanisms that can lead to an increased risk of VTE. Patients with known cancer are at increased risk of VTE; however, VTE may also be a predictor of subsequent cancer in the years afterwards. Furthermore, cancer patients with VTE are more likely to have advanced disease and a worse prognosis than cancer patients without a VTE episode. These findings may have implications for the clinical care of patients with VTE in terms of screening for cancer. However, extensive cancer screening programs are not recommended in general for patients with VTE. A wide range of antithrombotic drugs including heparin, oral anticoagulants, and platelet inhibitors have been examined in order to study the effect on the prevention and treatment of various cancers. These efforts have resulted in a considerable amount of useful data from animal models and a number of promising reports from retrospective analyses and small-scale trials linking antithrombotic treatment with an increased survival in cancer patients and even a lower risk of primary cancer. However, the clinical implications of these findings must await properly designed and conducted randomized clinical trials.

Original languageEnglish
JournalClinical Laboratory
Volume49
Issue number11-12
Pages (from-to)615-23
ISSN1433-6510
Publication statusPublished - 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Screening
Neoplasms
Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors
Hemostatics
Antineoplastic Agents
Anticoagulants
Heparin
Animals
Early Detection of Cancer
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Randomized Controlled Trials

Keywords

  • Anticoagulants
  • Humans
  • Neoplasms
  • Prognosis
  • Thromboembolism
  • Venous Thrombosis
  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Review

Cite this

Sørensen, H. T., Johnsen, S. P., Nørgård, B., Zacharski, L. R., & Baron, J. A. (2003). Cancer and venous thromboembolism: a multidisciplinary approach. Clinical Laboratory, 49(11-12), 615-23.
Sørensen, Henrik T ; Johnsen, Søren P ; Nørgård, Bente ; Zacharski, Leo R ; Baron, John A. / Cancer and venous thromboembolism : a multidisciplinary approach. In: Clinical Laboratory. 2003 ; Vol. 49, No. 11-12. pp. 615-23.
@article{a39a57028a0c40ceb84f036eac203bf6,
title = "Cancer and venous thromboembolism: a multidisciplinary approach",
abstract = "In this paper, we briefly review the relation between cancer and venous thromboembolism (VTE), an association that has been recognized for more than a century. In particular we focus on VTE as predictor and prognostic factor for cancer and the antineoplastic potential of antithrombotic treatment. Cancer may cause disturbances in the haemostatic system by numerous mechanisms that can lead to an increased risk of VTE. Patients with known cancer are at increased risk of VTE; however, VTE may also be a predictor of subsequent cancer in the years afterwards. Furthermore, cancer patients with VTE are more likely to have advanced disease and a worse prognosis than cancer patients without a VTE episode. These findings may have implications for the clinical care of patients with VTE in terms of screening for cancer. However, extensive cancer screening programs are not recommended in general for patients with VTE. A wide range of antithrombotic drugs including heparin, oral anticoagulants, and platelet inhibitors have been examined in order to study the effect on the prevention and treatment of various cancers. These efforts have resulted in a considerable amount of useful data from animal models and a number of promising reports from retrospective analyses and small-scale trials linking antithrombotic treatment with an increased survival in cancer patients and even a lower risk of primary cancer. However, the clinical implications of these findings must await properly designed and conducted randomized clinical trials.",
keywords = "Anticoagulants, Humans, Neoplasms, Prognosis, Thromboembolism, Venous Thrombosis, Journal Article, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't, Review",
author = "S{\o}rensen, {Henrik T} and Johnsen, {S{\o}ren P} and Bente N{\o}rg{\aa}rd and Zacharski, {Leo R} and Baron, {John A}",
year = "2003",
language = "English",
volume = "49",
pages = "615--23",
journal = "Clinical Laboratory",
issn = "1433-6510",
publisher = "Clinical Laboratory Publications",
number = "11-12",

}

Sørensen, HT, Johnsen, SP, Nørgård, B, Zacharski, LR & Baron, JA 2003, 'Cancer and venous thromboembolism: a multidisciplinary approach', Clinical Laboratory, vol. 49, no. 11-12, pp. 615-23.

Cancer and venous thromboembolism : a multidisciplinary approach. / Sørensen, Henrik T; Johnsen, Søren P; Nørgård, Bente; Zacharski, Leo R; Baron, John A.

In: Clinical Laboratory, Vol. 49, No. 11-12, 2003, p. 615-23.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cancer and venous thromboembolism

T2 - a multidisciplinary approach

AU - Sørensen, Henrik T

AU - Johnsen, Søren P

AU - Nørgård, Bente

AU - Zacharski, Leo R

AU - Baron, John A

PY - 2003

Y1 - 2003

N2 - In this paper, we briefly review the relation between cancer and venous thromboembolism (VTE), an association that has been recognized for more than a century. In particular we focus on VTE as predictor and prognostic factor for cancer and the antineoplastic potential of antithrombotic treatment. Cancer may cause disturbances in the haemostatic system by numerous mechanisms that can lead to an increased risk of VTE. Patients with known cancer are at increased risk of VTE; however, VTE may also be a predictor of subsequent cancer in the years afterwards. Furthermore, cancer patients with VTE are more likely to have advanced disease and a worse prognosis than cancer patients without a VTE episode. These findings may have implications for the clinical care of patients with VTE in terms of screening for cancer. However, extensive cancer screening programs are not recommended in general for patients with VTE. A wide range of antithrombotic drugs including heparin, oral anticoagulants, and platelet inhibitors have been examined in order to study the effect on the prevention and treatment of various cancers. These efforts have resulted in a considerable amount of useful data from animal models and a number of promising reports from retrospective analyses and small-scale trials linking antithrombotic treatment with an increased survival in cancer patients and even a lower risk of primary cancer. However, the clinical implications of these findings must await properly designed and conducted randomized clinical trials.

AB - In this paper, we briefly review the relation between cancer and venous thromboembolism (VTE), an association that has been recognized for more than a century. In particular we focus on VTE as predictor and prognostic factor for cancer and the antineoplastic potential of antithrombotic treatment. Cancer may cause disturbances in the haemostatic system by numerous mechanisms that can lead to an increased risk of VTE. Patients with known cancer are at increased risk of VTE; however, VTE may also be a predictor of subsequent cancer in the years afterwards. Furthermore, cancer patients with VTE are more likely to have advanced disease and a worse prognosis than cancer patients without a VTE episode. These findings may have implications for the clinical care of patients with VTE in terms of screening for cancer. However, extensive cancer screening programs are not recommended in general for patients with VTE. A wide range of antithrombotic drugs including heparin, oral anticoagulants, and platelet inhibitors have been examined in order to study the effect on the prevention and treatment of various cancers. These efforts have resulted in a considerable amount of useful data from animal models and a number of promising reports from retrospective analyses and small-scale trials linking antithrombotic treatment with an increased survival in cancer patients and even a lower risk of primary cancer. However, the clinical implications of these findings must await properly designed and conducted randomized clinical trials.

KW - Anticoagulants

KW - Humans

KW - Neoplasms

KW - Prognosis

KW - Thromboembolism

KW - Venous Thrombosis

KW - Journal Article

KW - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

KW - Review

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 14651332

VL - 49

SP - 615

EP - 623

JO - Clinical Laboratory

JF - Clinical Laboratory

SN - 1433-6510

IS - 11-12

ER -

Sørensen HT, Johnsen SP, Nørgård B, Zacharski LR, Baron JA. Cancer and venous thromboembolism: a multidisciplinary approach. Clinical Laboratory. 2003;49(11-12):615-23.