"But this is a good cancer": Patient perceptions of endometrial cancer in Denmark

Anne Sidenius, Lenore Manderson, Ole Mogensen, Martin Rudnicki, Lars Mikael Alling Møller, Helle Ploug Hansen

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

AIM: To explore endometrial cancer patients' perceptions of the disease and the influence of favorable prognoses on their experiences.

BACKGROUND: Endometrial cancer is associated with favorable prognoses, which may imply that patients experience distress to a lesser extent than other cancer patients with less positive treatment outcomes. However, most people with cancer report reduced quality of life and, despite endometrial cancer being prevalent worldwide, experiences of the disease have been little explored.

DESIGN: Ethnographic fieldwork with participant observations and interviews.

METHODS: Observations during clinical consultations at two Danish hospitals and interviews with women with endometrial cancer (n = 18) over a period of 6 months. The article adheres to the COREQ guidelines for reporting qualitative research.

RESULTS: We identify how patients consider cancer in general very likely to be fatal, while clinicians in contrast characterize endometrial cancer specifically as "good" because of favorable prognoses. We employ the concept of bricolage to illustrate how bits and pieces of biomedical knowledge and statistical evidence become intertwined with patients' past experiences and subjective ways of knowing, suggesting that patients' perceptions of endometrial cancer as a disease are somewhat dynamic.

CONCLUSIONS: Public stories and everyday life experiences of cancer provide a central framework for illness perceptions. As a result, patients retain the idea of a close connection between cancer and death, while also adopting the notion of endometrial cancer as 'good'. This influence how women responded to treatment and care. Framing endometrial cancer as "good" is not always helpful, as the impact of a cancer diagnosis per se is rarely favorable.

RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: In providing women with endometrial cancer with optimal support through diagnosis and treatment, clinicians should attend to the complexity of patients' illness understandings and be aware that assuring patients of a good prognosis not always has the expected impact. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

LanguageEnglish
JournalJournal of Clinical Nursing
Volume28
Issue number1-2
Pages245-256
ISSN0962-1067
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2019

Fingerprint

Denmark
Endometrial Neoplasms
Neoplasms
Interviews
Qualitative Research
Life Change Events
Referral and Consultation
Quality of Life
Guidelines

Cite this

Sidenius, Anne ; Manderson, Lenore ; Mogensen, Ole ; Rudnicki, Martin ; Møller, Lars Mikael Alling ; Hansen, Helle Ploug. / "But this is a good cancer" : Patient perceptions of endometrial cancer in Denmark. In: Journal of Clinical Nursing. 2019 ; Vol. 28, No. 1-2. pp. 245-256.
@article{669bbe815da247b5af998c378c183b93,
title = "{"}But this is a good cancer{"}: Patient perceptions of endometrial cancer in Denmark",
abstract = "AIM: To explore endometrial cancer patients' perceptions of the disease and the influence of favorable prognoses on their experiences.BACKGROUND: Endometrial cancer is associated with favorable prognoses, which may imply that patients experience distress to a lesser extent than other cancer patients with less positive treatment outcomes. However, most people with cancer report reduced quality of life and, despite endometrial cancer being prevalent worldwide, experiences of the disease have been little explored.DESIGN: Ethnographic fieldwork with participant observations and interviews.METHODS: Observations during clinical consultations at two Danish hospitals and interviews with women with endometrial cancer (n = 18) over a period of 6 months. The article adheres to the COREQ guidelines for reporting qualitative research.RESULTS: We identify how patients consider cancer in general very likely to be fatal, while clinicians in contrast characterize endometrial cancer specifically as {"}good{"} because of favorable prognoses. We employ the concept of bricolage to illustrate how bits and pieces of biomedical knowledge and statistical evidence become intertwined with patients' past experiences and subjective ways of knowing, suggesting that patients' perceptions of endometrial cancer as a disease are somewhat dynamic.CONCLUSIONS: Public stories and everyday life experiences of cancer provide a central framework for illness perceptions. As a result, patients retain the idea of a close connection between cancer and death, while also adopting the notion of endometrial cancer as 'good'. This influence how women responded to treatment and care. Framing endometrial cancer as {"}good{"} is not always helpful, as the impact of a cancer diagnosis per se is rarely favorable.RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: In providing women with endometrial cancer with optimal support through diagnosis and treatment, clinicians should attend to the complexity of patients' illness understandings and be aware that assuring patients of a good prognosis not always has the expected impact. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.",
author = "Anne Sidenius and Lenore Manderson and Ole Mogensen and Martin Rudnicki and M{\o}ller, {Lars Mikael Alling} and Hansen, {Helle Ploug}",
note = "This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1111/jocn.14615",
language = "English",
volume = "28",
pages = "245--256",
journal = "Journal of Clinical Nursing",
issn = "0962-1067",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "1-2",

}

"But this is a good cancer" : Patient perceptions of endometrial cancer in Denmark. / Sidenius, Anne; Manderson, Lenore; Mogensen, Ole; Rudnicki, Martin; Møller, Lars Mikael Alling; Hansen, Helle Ploug.

In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, Vol. 28, No. 1-2, 01.2019, p. 245-256.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - "But this is a good cancer"

T2 - Journal of Clinical Nursing

AU - Sidenius, Anne

AU - Manderson, Lenore

AU - Mogensen, Ole

AU - Rudnicki, Martin

AU - Møller, Lars Mikael Alling

AU - Hansen, Helle Ploug

N1 - This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

PY - 2019/1

Y1 - 2019/1

N2 - AIM: To explore endometrial cancer patients' perceptions of the disease and the influence of favorable prognoses on their experiences.BACKGROUND: Endometrial cancer is associated with favorable prognoses, which may imply that patients experience distress to a lesser extent than other cancer patients with less positive treatment outcomes. However, most people with cancer report reduced quality of life and, despite endometrial cancer being prevalent worldwide, experiences of the disease have been little explored.DESIGN: Ethnographic fieldwork with participant observations and interviews.METHODS: Observations during clinical consultations at two Danish hospitals and interviews with women with endometrial cancer (n = 18) over a period of 6 months. The article adheres to the COREQ guidelines for reporting qualitative research.RESULTS: We identify how patients consider cancer in general very likely to be fatal, while clinicians in contrast characterize endometrial cancer specifically as "good" because of favorable prognoses. We employ the concept of bricolage to illustrate how bits and pieces of biomedical knowledge and statistical evidence become intertwined with patients' past experiences and subjective ways of knowing, suggesting that patients' perceptions of endometrial cancer as a disease are somewhat dynamic.CONCLUSIONS: Public stories and everyday life experiences of cancer provide a central framework for illness perceptions. As a result, patients retain the idea of a close connection between cancer and death, while also adopting the notion of endometrial cancer as 'good'. This influence how women responded to treatment and care. Framing endometrial cancer as "good" is not always helpful, as the impact of a cancer diagnosis per se is rarely favorable.RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: In providing women with endometrial cancer with optimal support through diagnosis and treatment, clinicians should attend to the complexity of patients' illness understandings and be aware that assuring patients of a good prognosis not always has the expected impact. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

AB - AIM: To explore endometrial cancer patients' perceptions of the disease and the influence of favorable prognoses on their experiences.BACKGROUND: Endometrial cancer is associated with favorable prognoses, which may imply that patients experience distress to a lesser extent than other cancer patients with less positive treatment outcomes. However, most people with cancer report reduced quality of life and, despite endometrial cancer being prevalent worldwide, experiences of the disease have been little explored.DESIGN: Ethnographic fieldwork with participant observations and interviews.METHODS: Observations during clinical consultations at two Danish hospitals and interviews with women with endometrial cancer (n = 18) over a period of 6 months. The article adheres to the COREQ guidelines for reporting qualitative research.RESULTS: We identify how patients consider cancer in general very likely to be fatal, while clinicians in contrast characterize endometrial cancer specifically as "good" because of favorable prognoses. We employ the concept of bricolage to illustrate how bits and pieces of biomedical knowledge and statistical evidence become intertwined with patients' past experiences and subjective ways of knowing, suggesting that patients' perceptions of endometrial cancer as a disease are somewhat dynamic.CONCLUSIONS: Public stories and everyday life experiences of cancer provide a central framework for illness perceptions. As a result, patients retain the idea of a close connection between cancer and death, while also adopting the notion of endometrial cancer as 'good'. This influence how women responded to treatment and care. Framing endometrial cancer as "good" is not always helpful, as the impact of a cancer diagnosis per se is rarely favorable.RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: In providing women with endometrial cancer with optimal support through diagnosis and treatment, clinicians should attend to the complexity of patients' illness understandings and be aware that assuring patients of a good prognosis not always has the expected impact. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

U2 - 10.1111/jocn.14615

DO - 10.1111/jocn.14615

M3 - Journal article

VL - 28

SP - 245

EP - 256

JO - Journal of Clinical Nursing

JF - Journal of Clinical Nursing

SN - 0962-1067

IS - 1-2

ER -