Brief Report

Trends in Social Inequality in Drunkenness Among Danish Adolescents, 1991-2014

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: This study examined whether social inequality in frequent drunkenness among Danish adolescents changed from 1991 to 2014.

METHOD: We used data from the international Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) study, which provided nationally representative samples of 15-year-olds from seven comparable cross-sectional studies in Denmark (N = 8,655). The students provided data about frequency of drunkenness and parents' occupation.

RESULTS: In total, 38.6% reported to have been drunk at least four times, decreasing from 44.2% in 1991 to 21.2% in 2014. Most of the decrease took place in the latter part of the period. This decrease was found in all occupational social classes, but there was no change in absolute social inequality in drunkenness four or more times reported from 1991 to 2014. The sex- and yearadjusted odds ratio for frequent drunkenness was 0.80, 95% CI [0.70, 0.93] in low compared with high occupational social class. The statistical interaction between survey year and occupational social class was insignificant (p = .3601); that is, there was no change in relative social inequality in frequent drunkenness over time.

CONCLUSIONS: Drunkenness was more prevalent among adolescents from the high occupational social class, and this social inequality did not change from 1991 to 2014.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs
Volume79
Issue number4
Pages (from-to)561-566
ISSN1937-1888
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2018

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Alcoholic Intoxication
social inequality
social class
Health
Students
adolescent
trend
health behavior
cross-sectional study
Denmark
occupation
parents
Health Behavior
Occupations
interaction
Cross-Sectional Studies
Parents
Odds Ratio
school
student

Cite this

@article{677aac157f194e5ba97b9b230543b424,
title = "Brief Report: Trends in Social Inequality in Drunkenness Among Danish Adolescents, 1991-2014",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: This study examined whether social inequality in frequent drunkenness among Danish adolescents changed from 1991 to 2014.METHOD: We used data from the international Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) study, which provided nationally representative samples of 15-year-olds from seven comparable cross-sectional studies in Denmark (N = 8,655). The students provided data about frequency of drunkenness and parents' occupation.RESULTS: In total, 38.6{\%} reported to have been drunk at least four times, decreasing from 44.2{\%} in 1991 to 21.2{\%} in 2014. Most of the decrease took place in the latter part of the period. This decrease was found in all occupational social classes, but there was no change in absolute social inequality in drunkenness four or more times reported from 1991 to 2014. The sex- and yearadjusted odds ratio for frequent drunkenness was 0.80, 95{\%} CI [0.70, 0.93] in low compared with high occupational social class. The statistical interaction between survey year and occupational social class was insignificant (p = .3601); that is, there was no change in relative social inequality in frequent drunkenness over time.CONCLUSIONS: Drunkenness was more prevalent among adolescents from the high occupational social class, and this social inequality did not change from 1991 to 2014.",
author = "Pernille Bendtsen and Anette Andersen and Damsgaard, {Mogens Trab} and Pernille Due and Mette Rasmussen and Holstein, {Bj{\o}rn E}",
year = "2018",
month = "7",
doi = "10.15288/jsad.2018.79.561",
language = "English",
volume = "79",
pages = "561--566",
journal = "Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs",
issn = "1937-1888",
publisher = "Alcohol Research Documentation, Inc.",
number = "4",

}

Brief Report : Trends in Social Inequality in Drunkenness Among Danish Adolescents, 1991-2014. / Bendtsen, Pernille; Andersen, Anette; Damsgaard, Mogens Trab; Due, Pernille; Rasmussen, Mette; Holstein, Bjørn E.

In: Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, Vol. 79, No. 4, 07.2018, p. 561-566.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Brief Report

T2 - Trends in Social Inequality in Drunkenness Among Danish Adolescents, 1991-2014

AU - Bendtsen, Pernille

AU - Andersen, Anette

AU - Damsgaard, Mogens Trab

AU - Due, Pernille

AU - Rasmussen, Mette

AU - Holstein, Bjørn E

PY - 2018/7

Y1 - 2018/7

N2 - OBJECTIVE: This study examined whether social inequality in frequent drunkenness among Danish adolescents changed from 1991 to 2014.METHOD: We used data from the international Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) study, which provided nationally representative samples of 15-year-olds from seven comparable cross-sectional studies in Denmark (N = 8,655). The students provided data about frequency of drunkenness and parents' occupation.RESULTS: In total, 38.6% reported to have been drunk at least four times, decreasing from 44.2% in 1991 to 21.2% in 2014. Most of the decrease took place in the latter part of the period. This decrease was found in all occupational social classes, but there was no change in absolute social inequality in drunkenness four or more times reported from 1991 to 2014. The sex- and yearadjusted odds ratio for frequent drunkenness was 0.80, 95% CI [0.70, 0.93] in low compared with high occupational social class. The statistical interaction between survey year and occupational social class was insignificant (p = .3601); that is, there was no change in relative social inequality in frequent drunkenness over time.CONCLUSIONS: Drunkenness was more prevalent among adolescents from the high occupational social class, and this social inequality did not change from 1991 to 2014.

AB - OBJECTIVE: This study examined whether social inequality in frequent drunkenness among Danish adolescents changed from 1991 to 2014.METHOD: We used data from the international Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) study, which provided nationally representative samples of 15-year-olds from seven comparable cross-sectional studies in Denmark (N = 8,655). The students provided data about frequency of drunkenness and parents' occupation.RESULTS: In total, 38.6% reported to have been drunk at least four times, decreasing from 44.2% in 1991 to 21.2% in 2014. Most of the decrease took place in the latter part of the period. This decrease was found in all occupational social classes, but there was no change in absolute social inequality in drunkenness four or more times reported from 1991 to 2014. The sex- and yearadjusted odds ratio for frequent drunkenness was 0.80, 95% CI [0.70, 0.93] in low compared with high occupational social class. The statistical interaction between survey year and occupational social class was insignificant (p = .3601); that is, there was no change in relative social inequality in frequent drunkenness over time.CONCLUSIONS: Drunkenness was more prevalent among adolescents from the high occupational social class, and this social inequality did not change from 1991 to 2014.

U2 - 10.15288/jsad.2018.79.561

DO - 10.15288/jsad.2018.79.561

M3 - Journal article

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SN - 1937-1888

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