Bioactive components from flowers of Sambucus nigra L. increase glucose uptake in primary porcine myotube cultures and reduce fat accumulation in Caenorhabditis elegans

Sumangala Bhattacharya, Kathrine Bisgaard Christensen, Louise Cathrine Braun Olsen, Lars Porskjær Christensen, Kai Grevsen, Nils J. Færgeman, Karsten Kristiansen, Jette Feveile Young, Niels Oksbjerg

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Obesity and insulin resistance in skeletal muscles are major features of type 2 diabetes. In the present study, we examined the potential of Sambucus nigra flower (elderflowers) extracts to stimulate glucose uptake (GU) in primary porcine myotubes and reduce fat accumulation (FAc) in Caenorhabditis elegans. Bioassay guided chromatographic fractionations of extracts and fractions resulted in the identification of naringenin and 5-O- caffeoylquinic acid exhibiting a significant increase in GU. In addition, phenolic compounds related to those found in elderflowers were also tested, and among these, kaempferol, ferulic acid, p-coumaric acid, and caffeic acid increased GU significantly. FAc was significantly reduced in C. elegans, when treated with elderflower extracts, their fractions and the metabolites naringenin, quercetin-3-O-rutinoside, quercetin-3-O-glucoside, quercetin-3-O-5″-acetylglycoside, kaempferol-3-O-rutinoside, isorhamnetin-3-O-rutinoside, and isorhamnetin-3-O-glucoside and the related phenolic compounds kaempferol and ferulic acid. The study indicates that elderflower extracts contain bioactive compounds capable of modulating glucose and lipid metabolism, suitable for nutraceutical and pharmaceutical applications.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
Volume61
Issue number46
Pages (from-to)11033-11040
Number of pages8
ISSN0021-8561
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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