Big five personality and COVID-19 beliefs, behaviors, and vaccine intentions: The mediating role of political ideology

Adam R. Panish*, Steven G. Ludeke, Joseph A. Vitriol

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Because personal health decisions can impact the health of the broader community, researchers have increasingly sought to understand the psychological bases for different responses to public health communications and prescriptions. We contribute to this literature in two ways. First, we analyze the relationship between Big Five personality traits and three critical beliefs and behaviors in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. These are vaccine hesitancy, engagement in risky (vs. self-protective) pandemic social behaviors, and conspiratorial beliefs surrounding the origins, consequences, and public health response to COVID-19. Second, we draw on theory from political psychology to model the joint effects of personality and ideology. Our analysis of two American samples (MTurk = 510; Representative = 441) indicated that political liberalism mediated the relationship between Openness and COVID-related attitudes and behaviors.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere12885
JournalSocial and Personality Psychology Compass
Volume17
Issue number12
Number of pages11
ISSN1751-9004
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2023

Keywords

  • health
  • health psychology
  • personality
  • political psychology
  • social psychology and personality

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