Barriers to health care seeking with bothersome lower urinary tract symptoms among men: a nationwide study

Ann Rubach, Kirubakaran Balasubramaniam, Sandra Elnegaard, Stine E Larsen, Dorte E Jarbøl*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The majority of men who report urological symptoms of extreme concern or influence on daily activities do not contact their general practitioner (GP). No previous study on barriers to health care seeking with lower urinary tract symptoms in men has been carried out in a population-based setting.

OBJECTIVES: (i) To examine associations between different types of lower urinary tract symptoms and barriers to contact a GP in men with urological symptoms reported to be of concern or influencing daily activity (termed 'bothersome'); (ii) to examine associations between age and barriers to health care seeking in men with bothersome lower urinary tract symptoms.

STUDY DESIGN: A population-based cross-sectional study design.

METHODS: A total of 48 910 men aged 20 or older were randomly selected from the general Danish population. Data was collected in 2012. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios for reporting different barriers to health care seeking with bothersome lower urinary tract symptoms according to age and urological symptom.

RESULTS: A total of 23 240 men participated. Among men aged 20-39 years who reported bothersome lower urinary tract symptoms, the proportion who did not contact their GP ranged from 73.4% (incontinence) to 84.5% (nocturia). Men younger than 60 years of age had significantly higher odds for reporting any barriers to health care seeking compared to older men. The odds for reporting each of the barriers differed significantly according to the different urological symptoms.

CONCLUSION: Younger men more often report barriers to health care seeking, but the barriers differ between the different urological symptoms.

Original languageEnglish
JournalFamily Practice
Volume36
Issue number6
Pages (from-to)743-750
ISSN0263-2136
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2019

Fingerprint

Delivery of Health Care
General Practitioners
Population
Nocturia
Cross-Sectional Studies
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio

Keywords

  • General practitioner
  • help-seeking behaviour
  • lower urinary tract symptoms
  • men
  • quality of life
  • urinary incontinence

Cite this

@article{09f05c3255124537b212be8fc4a29737,
title = "Barriers to health care seeking with bothersome lower urinary tract symptoms among men: a nationwide study",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: The majority of men who report urological symptoms of extreme concern or influence on daily activities do not contact their general practitioner (GP). No previous study on barriers to health care seeking with lower urinary tract symptoms in men has been carried out in a population-based setting.OBJECTIVES: (i) To examine associations between different types of lower urinary tract symptoms and barriers to contact a GP in men with urological symptoms reported to be of concern or influencing daily activity (termed 'bothersome'); (ii) to examine associations between age and barriers to health care seeking in men with bothersome lower urinary tract symptoms.STUDY DESIGN: A population-based cross-sectional study design.METHODS: A total of 48 910 men aged 20 or older were randomly selected from the general Danish population. Data was collected in 2012. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios for reporting different barriers to health care seeking with bothersome lower urinary tract symptoms according to age and urological symptom.RESULTS: A total of 23 240 men participated. Among men aged 20-39 years who reported bothersome lower urinary tract symptoms, the proportion who did not contact their GP ranged from 73.4{\%} (incontinence) to 84.5{\%} (nocturia). Men younger than 60 years of age had significantly higher odds for reporting any barriers to health care seeking compared to older men. The odds for reporting each of the barriers differed significantly according to the different urological symptoms.CONCLUSION: Younger men more often report barriers to health care seeking, but the barriers differ between the different urological symptoms.",
keywords = "General practitioner, help-seeking behaviour, lower urinary tract symptoms, men, quality of life, urinary incontinence",
author = "Ann Rubach and Kirubakaran Balasubramaniam and Sandra Elnegaard and Larsen, {Stine E} and Jarb{\o}l, {Dorte E}",
note = "{\circledC} The Author(s) 2019. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.",
year = "2019",
month = "11",
doi = "10.1093/fampra/cmz019",
language = "English",
volume = "36",
pages = "743--750",
journal = "Family Practice",
issn = "0263-2136",
publisher = "Heinemann",
number = "6",

}

Barriers to health care seeking with bothersome lower urinary tract symptoms among men : a nationwide study. / Rubach, Ann; Balasubramaniam, Kirubakaran; Elnegaard, Sandra; Larsen, Stine E; Jarbøl, Dorte E.

In: Family Practice, Vol. 36, No. 6, 11.2019, p. 743-750.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Barriers to health care seeking with bothersome lower urinary tract symptoms among men

T2 - a nationwide study

AU - Rubach, Ann

AU - Balasubramaniam, Kirubakaran

AU - Elnegaard, Sandra

AU - Larsen, Stine E

AU - Jarbøl, Dorte E

N1 - © The Author(s) 2019. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

PY - 2019/11

Y1 - 2019/11

N2 - BACKGROUND: The majority of men who report urological symptoms of extreme concern or influence on daily activities do not contact their general practitioner (GP). No previous study on barriers to health care seeking with lower urinary tract symptoms in men has been carried out in a population-based setting.OBJECTIVES: (i) To examine associations between different types of lower urinary tract symptoms and barriers to contact a GP in men with urological symptoms reported to be of concern or influencing daily activity (termed 'bothersome'); (ii) to examine associations between age and barriers to health care seeking in men with bothersome lower urinary tract symptoms.STUDY DESIGN: A population-based cross-sectional study design.METHODS: A total of 48 910 men aged 20 or older were randomly selected from the general Danish population. Data was collected in 2012. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios for reporting different barriers to health care seeking with bothersome lower urinary tract symptoms according to age and urological symptom.RESULTS: A total of 23 240 men participated. Among men aged 20-39 years who reported bothersome lower urinary tract symptoms, the proportion who did not contact their GP ranged from 73.4% (incontinence) to 84.5% (nocturia). Men younger than 60 years of age had significantly higher odds for reporting any barriers to health care seeking compared to older men. The odds for reporting each of the barriers differed significantly according to the different urological symptoms.CONCLUSION: Younger men more often report barriers to health care seeking, but the barriers differ between the different urological symptoms.

AB - BACKGROUND: The majority of men who report urological symptoms of extreme concern or influence on daily activities do not contact their general practitioner (GP). No previous study on barriers to health care seeking with lower urinary tract symptoms in men has been carried out in a population-based setting.OBJECTIVES: (i) To examine associations between different types of lower urinary tract symptoms and barriers to contact a GP in men with urological symptoms reported to be of concern or influencing daily activity (termed 'bothersome'); (ii) to examine associations between age and barriers to health care seeking in men with bothersome lower urinary tract symptoms.STUDY DESIGN: A population-based cross-sectional study design.METHODS: A total of 48 910 men aged 20 or older were randomly selected from the general Danish population. Data was collected in 2012. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios for reporting different barriers to health care seeking with bothersome lower urinary tract symptoms according to age and urological symptom.RESULTS: A total of 23 240 men participated. Among men aged 20-39 years who reported bothersome lower urinary tract symptoms, the proportion who did not contact their GP ranged from 73.4% (incontinence) to 84.5% (nocturia). Men younger than 60 years of age had significantly higher odds for reporting any barriers to health care seeking compared to older men. The odds for reporting each of the barriers differed significantly according to the different urological symptoms.CONCLUSION: Younger men more often report barriers to health care seeking, but the barriers differ between the different urological symptoms.

KW - General practitioner

KW - help-seeking behaviour

KW - lower urinary tract symptoms

KW - men

KW - quality of life

KW - urinary incontinence

U2 - 10.1093/fampra/cmz019

DO - 10.1093/fampra/cmz019

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 31038698

VL - 36

SP - 743

EP - 750

JO - Family Practice

JF - Family Practice

SN - 0263-2136

IS - 6

ER -