Association between neighborhood walkability and GPS-measured walking, bicycling and vehicle time in adolescents

Jordan A. Carlson, Brian E. Saelens, Jacqueline Kerr, Jasper Schipperijn, Terry L. Conway, Lawrence D. Frank, Jim E. Chapman, Karen Glanz, Kelli L. Cain, James F. Sallis

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: To investigate relations of walking, bicycling and vehicle time to neighborhood walkability and total physical activity in youth.
Methods: Participants (N=690) were from 380 census block groups of high/low walkability and income in two US regions. Home neighborhood residential density, intersection density, retail density, entertainment density and walkability were derived using GIS. Minutes/day of walking, bicycling and vehicle time were derived from processing algorithms applied to GPS. Accelerometers estimated total daily moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Models were adjusted for nesting of days (N=2987) within participants within block groups.
Results: Walking occurred on 33%, active travel on 43%, and vehicle time on 91% of the days observed. Intersection density and neighborhood walkability were positively related to walking and bicycling and negatively related to vehicle time. Residential density was positively related to walking.
Conclusions: Increasing walking in youth could be effective in increasing total physical activity. Built environment findings suggest potential for increasing walking in youth through improving neighborhood walkability.
Original languageEnglish
JournalHealth & Place
Volume32
Issue numberMarch
Pages (from-to)1-7
Number of pages7
ISSN1353-8292
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2015

Bibliographical note

Available online 9 January 2015

Cite this

Carlson, Jordan A. ; Saelens, Brian E. ; Kerr, Jacqueline ; Schipperijn, Jasper ; Conway, Terry L. ; Frank, Lawrence D. ; Chapman, Jim E. ; Glanz, Karen ; Cain, Kelli L. ; Sallis, James F. / Association between neighborhood walkability and GPS-measured walking, bicycling and vehicle time in adolescents. In: Health & Place. 2015 ; Vol. 32, No. March. pp. 1-7.
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title = "Association between neighborhood walkability and GPS-measured walking, bicycling and vehicle time in adolescents",
abstract = "Objectives: To investigate relations of walking, bicycling and vehicle time to neighborhood walkability and total physical activity in youth. Methods: Participants (N=690) were from 380 census block groups of high/low walkability and income in two US regions. Home neighborhood residential density, intersection density, retail density, entertainment density and walkability were derived using GIS. Minutes/day of walking, bicycling and vehicle time were derived from processing algorithms applied to GPS. Accelerometers estimated total daily moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Models were adjusted for nesting of days (N=2987) within participants within block groups. Results: Walking occurred on 33{\%}, active travel on 43{\%}, and vehicle time on 91{\%} of the days observed. Intersection density and neighborhood walkability were positively related to walking and bicycling and negatively related to vehicle time. Residential density was positively related to walking. Conclusions: Increasing walking in youth could be effective in increasing total physical activity. Built environment findings suggest potential for increasing walking in youth through improving neighborhood walkability.",
keywords = "Density, Land use, Mode share, Physical activity, Transportation",
author = "Carlson, {Jordan A.} and Saelens, {Brian E.} and Jacqueline Kerr and Jasper Schipperijn and Conway, {Terry L.} and Frank, {Lawrence D.} and Chapman, {Jim E.} and Karen Glanz and Cain, {Kelli L.} and Sallis, {James F.}",
note = "Available online 9 January 2015",
year = "2015",
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doi = "10.1016/j.healthplace.2014.12.008",
language = "English",
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Carlson, JA, Saelens, BE, Kerr, J, Schipperijn, J, Conway, TL, Frank, LD, Chapman, JE, Glanz, K, Cain, KL & Sallis, JF 2015, 'Association between neighborhood walkability and GPS-measured walking, bicycling and vehicle time in adolescents', Health & Place, vol. 32, no. March, pp. 1-7. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.healthplace.2014.12.008

Association between neighborhood walkability and GPS-measured walking, bicycling and vehicle time in adolescents. / Carlson, Jordan A.; Saelens, Brian E.; Kerr, Jacqueline; Schipperijn, Jasper; Conway, Terry L.; Frank, Lawrence D.; Chapman, Jim E.; Glanz, Karen; Cain, Kelli L.; Sallis, James F.

In: Health & Place, Vol. 32, No. March, 03.2015, p. 1-7.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Association between neighborhood walkability and GPS-measured walking, bicycling and vehicle time in adolescents

AU - Carlson, Jordan A.

AU - Saelens, Brian E.

AU - Kerr, Jacqueline

AU - Schipperijn, Jasper

AU - Conway, Terry L.

AU - Frank, Lawrence D.

AU - Chapman, Jim E.

AU - Glanz, Karen

AU - Cain, Kelli L.

AU - Sallis, James F.

N1 - Available online 9 January 2015

PY - 2015/3

Y1 - 2015/3

N2 - Objectives: To investigate relations of walking, bicycling and vehicle time to neighborhood walkability and total physical activity in youth. Methods: Participants (N=690) were from 380 census block groups of high/low walkability and income in two US regions. Home neighborhood residential density, intersection density, retail density, entertainment density and walkability were derived using GIS. Minutes/day of walking, bicycling and vehicle time were derived from processing algorithms applied to GPS. Accelerometers estimated total daily moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Models were adjusted for nesting of days (N=2987) within participants within block groups. Results: Walking occurred on 33%, active travel on 43%, and vehicle time on 91% of the days observed. Intersection density and neighborhood walkability were positively related to walking and bicycling and negatively related to vehicle time. Residential density was positively related to walking. Conclusions: Increasing walking in youth could be effective in increasing total physical activity. Built environment findings suggest potential for increasing walking in youth through improving neighborhood walkability.

AB - Objectives: To investigate relations of walking, bicycling and vehicle time to neighborhood walkability and total physical activity in youth. Methods: Participants (N=690) were from 380 census block groups of high/low walkability and income in two US regions. Home neighborhood residential density, intersection density, retail density, entertainment density and walkability were derived using GIS. Minutes/day of walking, bicycling and vehicle time were derived from processing algorithms applied to GPS. Accelerometers estimated total daily moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Models were adjusted for nesting of days (N=2987) within participants within block groups. Results: Walking occurred on 33%, active travel on 43%, and vehicle time on 91% of the days observed. Intersection density and neighborhood walkability were positively related to walking and bicycling and negatively related to vehicle time. Residential density was positively related to walking. Conclusions: Increasing walking in youth could be effective in increasing total physical activity. Built environment findings suggest potential for increasing walking in youth through improving neighborhood walkability.

KW - Density

KW - Land use

KW - Mode share

KW - Physical activity

KW - Transportation

U2 - 10.1016/j.healthplace.2014.12.008

DO - 10.1016/j.healthplace.2014.12.008

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 25588788

VL - 32

SP - 1

EP - 7

JO - Health & Place

JF - Health & Place

SN - 1353-8292

IS - March

ER -