Association between body mass index and caries among children and adolescents

Susanne M Lempert, Karsten Froberg, Lisa Christensen, Peter L Kristensen, Berit L Heitmann

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this article was to examine the relationship between childhood caries, body mass index (BMI) and subsequent changes in BMI over 6 years, and to investigate whether these associations were modified by social class. METHODS: Data were from the European Youth Heart Study (EYHS) merged with data on caries experience from the Danish National Board of Health, (SCOR register). RESULTS: At baseline, 26.2% of the children/adolescents were caries free and 39% at follow-up. A larger percentage of normal weight children/adolescents were caries free, compared with the overweight/obese group of children/adolescents. The linear regression analysis showed that childhood caries was generally not associated with either BMI or subsequent changes in BMI. However, among children whose mothers were well educated, there was an inverse association between caries at baseline and subsequent changes in BMI over a period of 6 years, for example, a high caries experience was associated with a smaller increment in BMI, compared with the group of children with a low caries experience. No association was found for those with lower SES. CONCLUSION: An inverse association between caries and subsequent changes in BMI was found, but only among children with well-educated mothers, suggesting that high caries experience may be a marker for low future risk of overweight among the more advantaged. Associations did not appear to be significant among the less advantaged; however, numbers in this group were low, and an association may have been overlooked. Hence, more studies are needed to confirm these findings.
Original languageEnglish
JournalCommunity Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology
Volume42
Pages (from-to)53–60
ISSN0301-5661
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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Body Mass Index
Mothers
Linear Models
Regression Analysis
Weights and Measures
Health

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title = "Association between body mass index and caries among children and adolescents",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: The aim of this article was to examine the relationship between childhood caries, body mass index (BMI) and subsequent changes in BMI over 6 years, and to investigate whether these associations were modified by social class. METHODS: Data were from the European Youth Heart Study (EYHS) merged with data on caries experience from the Danish National Board of Health, (SCOR register). RESULTS: At baseline, 26.2{\%} of the children/adolescents were caries free and 39{\%} at follow-up. A larger percentage of normal weight children/adolescents were caries free, compared with the overweight/obese group of children/adolescents. The linear regression analysis showed that childhood caries was generally not associated with either BMI or subsequent changes in BMI. However, among children whose mothers were well educated, there was an inverse association between caries at baseline and subsequent changes in BMI over a period of 6 years, for example, a high caries experience was associated with a smaller increment in BMI, compared with the group of children with a low caries experience. No association was found for those with lower SES. CONCLUSION: An inverse association between caries and subsequent changes in BMI was found, but only among children with well-educated mothers, suggesting that high caries experience may be a marker for low future risk of overweight among the more advantaged. Associations did not appear to be significant among the less advantaged; however, numbers in this group were low, and an association may have been overlooked. Hence, more studies are needed to confirm these findings.",
author = "Lempert, {Susanne M} and Karsten Froberg and Lisa Christensen and Kristensen, {Peter L} and Heitmann, {Berit L}",
note = "Epub ahead of print",
year = "2013",
doi = "10.1111/cdoe.12055",
language = "English",
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pages = "53–60",
journal = "Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology",
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Association between body mass index and caries among children and adolescents. / Lempert, Susanne M; Froberg, Karsten; Christensen, Lisa; Kristensen, Peter L; Heitmann, Berit L.

In: Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology, Vol. 42, 2013, p. 53–60.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Association between body mass index and caries among children and adolescents

AU - Lempert, Susanne M

AU - Froberg, Karsten

AU - Christensen, Lisa

AU - Kristensen, Peter L

AU - Heitmann, Berit L

N1 - Epub ahead of print

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - OBJECTIVE: The aim of this article was to examine the relationship between childhood caries, body mass index (BMI) and subsequent changes in BMI over 6 years, and to investigate whether these associations were modified by social class. METHODS: Data were from the European Youth Heart Study (EYHS) merged with data on caries experience from the Danish National Board of Health, (SCOR register). RESULTS: At baseline, 26.2% of the children/adolescents were caries free and 39% at follow-up. A larger percentage of normal weight children/adolescents were caries free, compared with the overweight/obese group of children/adolescents. The linear regression analysis showed that childhood caries was generally not associated with either BMI or subsequent changes in BMI. However, among children whose mothers were well educated, there was an inverse association between caries at baseline and subsequent changes in BMI over a period of 6 years, for example, a high caries experience was associated with a smaller increment in BMI, compared with the group of children with a low caries experience. No association was found for those with lower SES. CONCLUSION: An inverse association between caries and subsequent changes in BMI was found, but only among children with well-educated mothers, suggesting that high caries experience may be a marker for low future risk of overweight among the more advantaged. Associations did not appear to be significant among the less advantaged; however, numbers in this group were low, and an association may have been overlooked. Hence, more studies are needed to confirm these findings.

AB - OBJECTIVE: The aim of this article was to examine the relationship between childhood caries, body mass index (BMI) and subsequent changes in BMI over 6 years, and to investigate whether these associations were modified by social class. METHODS: Data were from the European Youth Heart Study (EYHS) merged with data on caries experience from the Danish National Board of Health, (SCOR register). RESULTS: At baseline, 26.2% of the children/adolescents were caries free and 39% at follow-up. A larger percentage of normal weight children/adolescents were caries free, compared with the overweight/obese group of children/adolescents. The linear regression analysis showed that childhood caries was generally not associated with either BMI or subsequent changes in BMI. However, among children whose mothers were well educated, there was an inverse association between caries at baseline and subsequent changes in BMI over a period of 6 years, for example, a high caries experience was associated with a smaller increment in BMI, compared with the group of children with a low caries experience. No association was found for those with lower SES. CONCLUSION: An inverse association between caries and subsequent changes in BMI was found, but only among children with well-educated mothers, suggesting that high caries experience may be a marker for low future risk of overweight among the more advantaged. Associations did not appear to be significant among the less advantaged; however, numbers in this group were low, and an association may have been overlooked. Hence, more studies are needed to confirm these findings.

U2 - 10.1111/cdoe.12055

DO - 10.1111/cdoe.12055

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 23763718

VL - 42

SP - 53

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JO - Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology

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SN - 0301-5661

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