Acoustic conditions affecting sound communication in air and underwater

Ole Næsbye Larsen, Craig Radford

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingBook chapterResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Biodiversity across the animal kingdom is reflected in acoustic diversity,
and the evolution of these signals is driven by the ability to produce and hear sounds within the complex nature of soundscapes. Signals from the sender are attenuated and their structure is changed during propagation to receivers, and other sounds contributing to the soundscape can interfere with signals intended for the receiver. Therefore, the message encoded in the sender’s signal may be difficult or impossible for the potential receiver to decode unless the receiver adapts behaviorally. This chapter discusses the potential effects of sound propagation and environmental sound on communication both in air and underwater. First, the wave equation is defined; second, attenuation, absorption and scattering principles are discussed in relation to physical sound propagation effects on the sender’s signal; and third, abiotic, biotic, and anthropogenic sources of environmental noise are introduced and discussed. Environmental noise is present in all habitats, and soundscapes are getting louder, in part mostly due to increased anthropogenic noise inputs. Therefore, animals that rely on sound to communicate have to adapt and evolve to their local
soundscape to get their message across.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationEffects of Anthropogenic Noise on Animals
EditorsH. Slabbekoorn, R. J. Dooling, A. N. Popper, R. R. Fay
Volume66
Place of PublicationNew York, Heidelberg, Dordrecht, London
PublisherSpringer
Publication date23. Aug 2018
Pages109-144
Chapter5
ISBN (Print)9781493985722
ISBN (Electronic)9781493985746
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 23. Aug 2018
SeriesSpringer Handbook of Auditory Research
Volume66
ISSN0947-2657

Fingerprint

communication
receivers
acoustics
air
sound propagation
messages
transmitters
animals
biological diversity
habitats
wave equations
attenuation
propagation
scattering

Keywords

  • Abiotic noise · Acoustic near and far field · Biotic noise · Cylindrical attenuation · Diffraction · Ground effect · Medium absorption · Reflection · Refraction · Reverberation · Scattering · Shallow-water acoustics · Spherical attenuation · Turbulence · Wave equation

Cite this

Larsen, O. N., & Radford, C. (2018). Acoustic conditions affecting sound communication in air and underwater. In H. Slabbekoorn, R. J. Dooling, A. N. Popper, & R. R. Fay (Eds.), Effects of Anthropogenic Noise on Animals (Vol. 66, pp. 109-144). New York, Heidelberg, Dordrecht, London: Springer. Springer Handbook of Auditory Research, Vol.. 66 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-8574-6_5
Larsen, Ole Næsbye ; Radford, Craig. / Acoustic conditions affecting sound communication in air and underwater. Effects of Anthropogenic Noise on Animals. editor / H. Slabbekoorn ; R. J. Dooling ; A. N. Popper ; R. R. Fay. Vol. 66 New York, Heidelberg, Dordrecht, London : Springer, 2018. pp. 109-144 (Springer Handbook of Auditory Research, Vol. 66).
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Larsen, ON & Radford, C 2018, Acoustic conditions affecting sound communication in air and underwater. in H Slabbekoorn, RJ Dooling, AN Popper & RR Fay (eds), Effects of Anthropogenic Noise on Animals. vol. 66, Springer, New York, Heidelberg, Dordrecht, London, Springer Handbook of Auditory Research, vol. 66, pp. 109-144. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-8574-6_5

Acoustic conditions affecting sound communication in air and underwater. / Larsen, Ole Næsbye; Radford, Craig.

Effects of Anthropogenic Noise on Animals. ed. / H. Slabbekoorn; R. J. Dooling; A. N. Popper; R. R. Fay. Vol. 66 New York, Heidelberg, Dordrecht, London : Springer, 2018. p. 109-144 (Springer Handbook of Auditory Research, Vol. 66).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingBook chapterResearchpeer-review

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Larsen ON, Radford C. Acoustic conditions affecting sound communication in air and underwater. In Slabbekoorn H, Dooling RJ, Popper AN, Fay RR, editors, Effects of Anthropogenic Noise on Animals. Vol. 66. New York, Heidelberg, Dordrecht, London: Springer. 2018. p. 109-144. (Springer Handbook of Auditory Research, Vol. 66). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-8574-6_5