Adherence to a long-term progressive resistance training program, combining supervised and home-based exercise for breast cancer patients during adjuvant treatment

Linnea Waldorff Lund, Gunn Ammitzbøll*, Dorte Gilså Hansen, Elisabeth Anne Wreford Andersen, Susanne Oksbjerg Dalton

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Background: The purpose of the study was to examine adherence and identify patient- and treatment-related factors associated with adherence to a 20-week combined supervised and home-based progressive resistance training program in women treated for breast cancer. Methodology: The study population consisted of the intervention group in a randomized clinical trial examining the effect of resistance exercise on lymphoedema prevention (n = 82). The full program lasted 50 weeks, with an initial 20 weeks combined supervised and home-based exercise followed by 30 weeks self-administered exercise. Information about attendance rates (supervised exercise) and exercise dairies (home-based exercise) in the first 20 weeks was available for 74 and 62 participants, respectively. Adherence was measured as numbers of exercise sessions performed divided by expected number of exercise sessions with >2/3 categorized as high adherence. Age-adjusted odds ratios (OR) were used to assess the associations between patient- and treatment-related factors with adherence. Results: The number of participants with high adherence to supervised exercise decreased in the late period (from week 11 onward) compared to the early period (65% vs. 48%) whereas the proportion of participants with high adherence to home-based exercise remained close to 55%. The most prominent factor associated with high adherence to supervised exercise was neoadjuvant chemotherapy [OR 7.09; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.12–44.62]. For home-based exercise, lower adherence was seen in obese participants (OR 0.16; 95% CI, 0.04–0.65) and in participants with average or below average lower body muscle strength at baseline (OR 0.12; 95% CI, 0.03–0.46). Conclusion: The results of this study offer valuable information on factors associated with adherence to a program of supervised and home-based exercise. Interventions may be adapted to ensure higher adherence rates through supportive efforts targeted to women who are obese, have low muscle strength and who receive no or adjuvant chemotherapy (as opposed to neoadjuvant chemotherapy) during exercise.

Original languageEnglish
JournalActa Oncologica
Volume58
Issue number5
Pages (from-to)650-657
ISSN0284-186X
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 4. May 2019

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Resistance Training
Exercise
Education
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Lymphedema
Adjuvant Chemotherapy

Cite this

Lund, Linnea Waldorff ; Ammitzbøll, Gunn ; Hansen, Dorte Gilså ; Andersen, Elisabeth Anne Wreford ; Dalton, Susanne Oksbjerg. / Adherence to a long-term progressive resistance training program, combining supervised and home-based exercise for breast cancer patients during adjuvant treatment. In: Acta Oncologica. 2019 ; Vol. 58, No. 5. pp. 650-657.
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title = "Adherence to a long-term progressive resistance training program, combining supervised and home-based exercise for breast cancer patients during adjuvant treatment",
abstract = "Background: The purpose of the study was to examine adherence and identify patient- and treatment-related factors associated with adherence to a 20-week combined supervised and home-based progressive resistance training program in women treated for breast cancer. Methodology: The study population consisted of the intervention group in a randomized clinical trial examining the effect of resistance exercise on lymphoedema prevention (n = 82). The full program lasted 50 weeks, with an initial 20 weeks combined supervised and home-based exercise followed by 30 weeks self-administered exercise. Information about attendance rates (supervised exercise) and exercise dairies (home-based exercise) in the first 20 weeks was available for 74 and 62 participants, respectively. Adherence was measured as numbers of exercise sessions performed divided by expected number of exercise sessions with >2/3 categorized as high adherence. Age-adjusted odds ratios (OR) were used to assess the associations between patient- and treatment-related factors with adherence. Results: The number of participants with high adherence to supervised exercise decreased in the late period (from week 11 onward) compared to the early period (65{\%} vs. 48{\%}) whereas the proportion of participants with high adherence to home-based exercise remained close to 55{\%}. The most prominent factor associated with high adherence to supervised exercise was neoadjuvant chemotherapy [OR 7.09; 95{\%} confidence interval (CI), 1.12–44.62]. For home-based exercise, lower adherence was seen in obese participants (OR 0.16; 95{\%} CI, 0.04–0.65) and in participants with average or below average lower body muscle strength at baseline (OR 0.12; 95{\%} CI, 0.03–0.46). Conclusion: The results of this study offer valuable information on factors associated with adherence to a program of supervised and home-based exercise. Interventions may be adapted to ensure higher adherence rates through supportive efforts targeted to women who are obese, have low muscle strength and who receive no or adjuvant chemotherapy (as opposed to neoadjuvant chemotherapy) during exercise.",
author = "Lund, {Linnea Waldorff} and Gunn Ammitzb{\o}ll and Hansen, {Dorte Gils{\aa}} and Andersen, {Elisabeth Anne Wreford} and Dalton, {Susanne Oksbjerg}",
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Adherence to a long-term progressive resistance training program, combining supervised and home-based exercise for breast cancer patients during adjuvant treatment. / Lund, Linnea Waldorff; Ammitzbøll, Gunn; Hansen, Dorte Gilså; Andersen, Elisabeth Anne Wreford; Dalton, Susanne Oksbjerg.

In: Acta Oncologica, Vol. 58, No. 5, 04.05.2019, p. 650-657.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Adherence to a long-term progressive resistance training program, combining supervised and home-based exercise for breast cancer patients during adjuvant treatment

AU - Lund, Linnea Waldorff

AU - Ammitzbøll, Gunn

AU - Hansen, Dorte Gilså

AU - Andersen, Elisabeth Anne Wreford

AU - Dalton, Susanne Oksbjerg

PY - 2019/5/4

Y1 - 2019/5/4

N2 - Background: The purpose of the study was to examine adherence and identify patient- and treatment-related factors associated with adherence to a 20-week combined supervised and home-based progressive resistance training program in women treated for breast cancer. Methodology: The study population consisted of the intervention group in a randomized clinical trial examining the effect of resistance exercise on lymphoedema prevention (n = 82). The full program lasted 50 weeks, with an initial 20 weeks combined supervised and home-based exercise followed by 30 weeks self-administered exercise. Information about attendance rates (supervised exercise) and exercise dairies (home-based exercise) in the first 20 weeks was available for 74 and 62 participants, respectively. Adherence was measured as numbers of exercise sessions performed divided by expected number of exercise sessions with >2/3 categorized as high adherence. Age-adjusted odds ratios (OR) were used to assess the associations between patient- and treatment-related factors with adherence. Results: The number of participants with high adherence to supervised exercise decreased in the late period (from week 11 onward) compared to the early period (65% vs. 48%) whereas the proportion of participants with high adherence to home-based exercise remained close to 55%. The most prominent factor associated with high adherence to supervised exercise was neoadjuvant chemotherapy [OR 7.09; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.12–44.62]. For home-based exercise, lower adherence was seen in obese participants (OR 0.16; 95% CI, 0.04–0.65) and in participants with average or below average lower body muscle strength at baseline (OR 0.12; 95% CI, 0.03–0.46). Conclusion: The results of this study offer valuable information on factors associated with adherence to a program of supervised and home-based exercise. Interventions may be adapted to ensure higher adherence rates through supportive efforts targeted to women who are obese, have low muscle strength and who receive no or adjuvant chemotherapy (as opposed to neoadjuvant chemotherapy) during exercise.

AB - Background: The purpose of the study was to examine adherence and identify patient- and treatment-related factors associated with adherence to a 20-week combined supervised and home-based progressive resistance training program in women treated for breast cancer. Methodology: The study population consisted of the intervention group in a randomized clinical trial examining the effect of resistance exercise on lymphoedema prevention (n = 82). The full program lasted 50 weeks, with an initial 20 weeks combined supervised and home-based exercise followed by 30 weeks self-administered exercise. Information about attendance rates (supervised exercise) and exercise dairies (home-based exercise) in the first 20 weeks was available for 74 and 62 participants, respectively. Adherence was measured as numbers of exercise sessions performed divided by expected number of exercise sessions with >2/3 categorized as high adherence. Age-adjusted odds ratios (OR) were used to assess the associations between patient- and treatment-related factors with adherence. Results: The number of participants with high adherence to supervised exercise decreased in the late period (from week 11 onward) compared to the early period (65% vs. 48%) whereas the proportion of participants with high adherence to home-based exercise remained close to 55%. The most prominent factor associated with high adherence to supervised exercise was neoadjuvant chemotherapy [OR 7.09; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.12–44.62]. For home-based exercise, lower adherence was seen in obese participants (OR 0.16; 95% CI, 0.04–0.65) and in participants with average or below average lower body muscle strength at baseline (OR 0.12; 95% CI, 0.03–0.46). Conclusion: The results of this study offer valuable information on factors associated with adherence to a program of supervised and home-based exercise. Interventions may be adapted to ensure higher adherence rates through supportive efforts targeted to women who are obese, have low muscle strength and who receive no or adjuvant chemotherapy (as opposed to neoadjuvant chemotherapy) during exercise.

U2 - 10.1080/0284186X.2018.1560497

DO - 10.1080/0284186X.2018.1560497

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 30698050

AN - SCOPUS:85060891017

VL - 58

SP - 650

EP - 657

JO - Acta Oncologica

JF - Acta Oncologica

SN - 0284-186X

IS - 5

ER -