Accelerometer-measured dose-response for physical activity, sedentary time, and mortality in US adults

Charles E Matthews, S. K. Keadle, Richard P Troiano, Lynn Kahle, A Koster, Robert J Brychta, D. Van Domelen, P. Caserotti, K. Y. Chen, T. B. Harris, David Berrigan

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Background: Moderate-to-vigorous-intensity physical activity is recommended to maintain and improve health, but the mortality benefits of light activity and risk for sedentary time remain uncertain. Objectives: Using accelerometer-based measures, we 1) described the mortality dose-response for sedentary time and light-and moderateto-vigorous-intensity activity using restricted cubic splines, and 2) estimated the mortality benefits associated with replacing sedentary time with physical activity, accounting for total activity. Design: US adults (n = 4840) from NHANES (2003-2006) wore an accelerometer for #7 d and were followed prospectively for mortality. Proportional hazards models were used to estimate adjusted HRs and 95% CIs for mortality associations with time spent sedentary and in light-and moderate-to-vigorous-intensity physical activity. Splines were used to graphically present behavior-mortality relation. Isotemporal models estimated replacement associations for sedentary time, and separate models were fit for low-(,5.8 h total activity/d) and high-active participants to account for nonlinear associations. Results: Over a mean of 6.6 y, 700 deaths occurred. Compared with less-sedentary adults (6 sedentary h/d), those who spent 10 sedentary h/d had 29% greater risk (HR: 1.29; 95% CI: 1.1, 1.5). Compared with those who did less light activity (3 h/d), those who did 5 h of light activity/d had 23% lower risk (HR: 0.77; 95% CI: 0.6, 1.0). There was no association with mortality for sedentary time or light or moderate-to-vigorous activity in highly active adults. In less-active adults, replacing 1 h of sedentary time with either lightor moderate-to-vigorous-intensity activity was associated with 18% and 42% lower mortality, respectively. Conclusions: Health promotion efforts for physical activity have mostly focused on moderate-to-vigorous activity. However, our findings derived from accelerometer-based measurements suggest that increasing light-intensity activity and reducing sedentary time are also important, particularly for inactive adults. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.
Original languageEnglish
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume104
Issue number5
Pages (from-to)1424-1432
ISSN0002-9165
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Cite this

Matthews, C. E., Keadle, S. K., Troiano, R. P., Kahle, L., Koster, A., Brychta, R. J., ... Berrigan, D. (2016). Accelerometer-measured dose-response for physical activity, sedentary time, and mortality in US adults. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 104(5), 1424-1432. https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.116.135129
Matthews, Charles E ; Keadle, S. K. ; Troiano, Richard P ; Kahle, Lynn ; Koster, A ; Brychta, Robert J ; Van Domelen, D. ; Caserotti, P. ; Chen, K. Y. ; Harris, T. B. ; Berrigan, David. / Accelerometer-measured dose-response for physical activity, sedentary time, and mortality in US adults. In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2016 ; Vol. 104, No. 5. pp. 1424-1432.
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title = "Accelerometer-measured dose-response for physical activity, sedentary time, and mortality in US adults",
abstract = "Background: Moderate-to-vigorous-intensity physical activity is recommended to maintain and improve health, but the mortality benefits of light activity and risk for sedentary time remain uncertain. Objectives: Using accelerometer-based measures, we 1) described the mortality dose-response for sedentary time and light-and moderateto-vigorous-intensity activity using restricted cubic splines, and 2) estimated the mortality benefits associated with replacing sedentary time with physical activity, accounting for total activity. Design: US adults (n = 4840) from NHANES (2003-2006) wore an accelerometer for #7 d and were followed prospectively for mortality. Proportional hazards models were used to estimate adjusted HRs and 95{\%} CIs for mortality associations with time spent sedentary and in light-and moderate-to-vigorous-intensity physical activity. Splines were used to graphically present behavior-mortality relation. Isotemporal models estimated replacement associations for sedentary time, and separate models were fit for low-(,5.8 h total activity/d) and high-active participants to account for nonlinear associations. Results: Over a mean of 6.6 y, 700 deaths occurred. Compared with less-sedentary adults (6 sedentary h/d), those who spent 10 sedentary h/d had 29{\%} greater risk (HR: 1.29; 95{\%} CI: 1.1, 1.5). Compared with those who did less light activity (3 h/d), those who did 5 h of light activity/d had 23{\%} lower risk (HR: 0.77; 95{\%} CI: 0.6, 1.0). There was no association with mortality for sedentary time or light or moderate-to-vigorous activity in highly active adults. In less-active adults, replacing 1 h of sedentary time with either lightor moderate-to-vigorous-intensity activity was associated with 18{\%} and 42{\%} lower mortality, respectively. Conclusions: Health promotion efforts for physical activity have mostly focused on moderate-to-vigorous activity. However, our findings derived from accelerometer-based measurements suggest that increasing light-intensity activity and reducing sedentary time are also important, particularly for inactive adults. {\circledC} 2016 American Society for Nutrition.",
author = "Matthews, {Charles E} and Keadle, {S. K.} and Troiano, {Richard P} and Lynn Kahle and A Koster and Brychta, {Robert J} and {Van Domelen}, D. and P. Caserotti and Chen, {K. Y.} and Harris, {T. B.} and David Berrigan",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.3945/ajcn.116.135129",
language = "English",
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Matthews, CE, Keadle, SK, Troiano, RP, Kahle, L, Koster, A, Brychta, RJ, Van Domelen, D, Caserotti, P, Chen, KY, Harris, TB & Berrigan, D 2016, 'Accelerometer-measured dose-response for physical activity, sedentary time, and mortality in US adults', American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 104, no. 5, pp. 1424-1432. https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.116.135129

Accelerometer-measured dose-response for physical activity, sedentary time, and mortality in US adults. / Matthews, Charles E; Keadle, S. K.; Troiano, Richard P; Kahle, Lynn; Koster, A; Brychta, Robert J; Van Domelen, D.; Caserotti, P.; Chen, K. Y.; Harris, T. B.; Berrigan, David.

In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 104, No. 5, 2016, p. 1424-1432.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Accelerometer-measured dose-response for physical activity, sedentary time, and mortality in US adults

AU - Matthews, Charles E

AU - Keadle, S. K.

AU - Troiano, Richard P

AU - Kahle, Lynn

AU - Koster, A

AU - Brychta, Robert J

AU - Van Domelen, D.

AU - Caserotti, P.

AU - Chen, K. Y.

AU - Harris, T. B.

AU - Berrigan, David

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - Background: Moderate-to-vigorous-intensity physical activity is recommended to maintain and improve health, but the mortality benefits of light activity and risk for sedentary time remain uncertain. Objectives: Using accelerometer-based measures, we 1) described the mortality dose-response for sedentary time and light-and moderateto-vigorous-intensity activity using restricted cubic splines, and 2) estimated the mortality benefits associated with replacing sedentary time with physical activity, accounting for total activity. Design: US adults (n = 4840) from NHANES (2003-2006) wore an accelerometer for #7 d and were followed prospectively for mortality. Proportional hazards models were used to estimate adjusted HRs and 95% CIs for mortality associations with time spent sedentary and in light-and moderate-to-vigorous-intensity physical activity. Splines were used to graphically present behavior-mortality relation. Isotemporal models estimated replacement associations for sedentary time, and separate models were fit for low-(,5.8 h total activity/d) and high-active participants to account for nonlinear associations. Results: Over a mean of 6.6 y, 700 deaths occurred. Compared with less-sedentary adults (6 sedentary h/d), those who spent 10 sedentary h/d had 29% greater risk (HR: 1.29; 95% CI: 1.1, 1.5). Compared with those who did less light activity (3 h/d), those who did 5 h of light activity/d had 23% lower risk (HR: 0.77; 95% CI: 0.6, 1.0). There was no association with mortality for sedentary time or light or moderate-to-vigorous activity in highly active adults. In less-active adults, replacing 1 h of sedentary time with either lightor moderate-to-vigorous-intensity activity was associated with 18% and 42% lower mortality, respectively. Conclusions: Health promotion efforts for physical activity have mostly focused on moderate-to-vigorous activity. However, our findings derived from accelerometer-based measurements suggest that increasing light-intensity activity and reducing sedentary time are also important, particularly for inactive adults. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

AB - Background: Moderate-to-vigorous-intensity physical activity is recommended to maintain and improve health, but the mortality benefits of light activity and risk for sedentary time remain uncertain. Objectives: Using accelerometer-based measures, we 1) described the mortality dose-response for sedentary time and light-and moderateto-vigorous-intensity activity using restricted cubic splines, and 2) estimated the mortality benefits associated with replacing sedentary time with physical activity, accounting for total activity. Design: US adults (n = 4840) from NHANES (2003-2006) wore an accelerometer for #7 d and were followed prospectively for mortality. Proportional hazards models were used to estimate adjusted HRs and 95% CIs for mortality associations with time spent sedentary and in light-and moderate-to-vigorous-intensity physical activity. Splines were used to graphically present behavior-mortality relation. Isotemporal models estimated replacement associations for sedentary time, and separate models were fit for low-(,5.8 h total activity/d) and high-active participants to account for nonlinear associations. Results: Over a mean of 6.6 y, 700 deaths occurred. Compared with less-sedentary adults (6 sedentary h/d), those who spent 10 sedentary h/d had 29% greater risk (HR: 1.29; 95% CI: 1.1, 1.5). Compared with those who did less light activity (3 h/d), those who did 5 h of light activity/d had 23% lower risk (HR: 0.77; 95% CI: 0.6, 1.0). There was no association with mortality for sedentary time or light or moderate-to-vigorous activity in highly active adults. In less-active adults, replacing 1 h of sedentary time with either lightor moderate-to-vigorous-intensity activity was associated with 18% and 42% lower mortality, respectively. Conclusions: Health promotion efforts for physical activity have mostly focused on moderate-to-vigorous activity. However, our findings derived from accelerometer-based measurements suggest that increasing light-intensity activity and reducing sedentary time are also important, particularly for inactive adults. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

U2 - 10.3945/ajcn.116.135129

DO - 10.3945/ajcn.116.135129

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 27707702

VL - 104

SP - 1424

EP - 1432

JO - The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

JF - The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

SN - 0002-9165

IS - 5

ER -