A study of living wage effects on employees' performance-related attitudes and behaviour

Zhaocheng Zeng*, Benson Honig

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Despite the surge of interest in living wage research, most studies pay little attention to the effect of living wages on employee attitudes and behaviour. We examine the differences between living wage and minimum wage workers on three attitudinal and behavioural outcomes: affective commitment, organizational citizenship behaviour (OCB), and turnover intention. We also examine the effects of training and benefits on the three outcomes. Results show that living wage workers have higher affective commitment and lower turnover intention. Training and benefits also improve workers' attitudinal and behavioural outcomes variously.

Original languageEnglish
JournalCanadian Journal of Administrative Sciences
Volume34
Issue number1
Pages (from-to)19-32
ISSN0825-0383
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Wages
wage
employee
Personnel
turnover
worker
performance
commitment
minimum wage
citizenship
Living wage
Employee performance
Workers
Affective commitment
Turnover intention

Keywords

  • affective commitment
  • living wage
  • minimum wage
  • OCB
  • turnover intention

Cite this

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A study of living wage effects on employees' performance-related attitudes and behaviour. / Zeng, Zhaocheng; Honig, Benson.

In: Canadian Journal of Administrative Sciences, Vol. 34, No. 1, 2017, p. 19-32.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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