A nationwide study of health-related quality of life, stress, pain or discomfort and the use of medicine among problem gamblers

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Abstract

AIM: The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between problem gambling and health-related quality of life, stress, pain or discomfort and the use of analgesics and sleeping pills.

METHODS: Data derives from the Danish Health and Morbidity Survey 2010. The survey was based on a random sample of 25,000 adult Danes (response rate: 61%), and data were collected via a self-administered questionnaire. The Lie/Bet Questionnaire was used as the screening instrument for problem gambling. Respondents were categorised as current, previous or non-problem gamblers. The questionnaire also included topics such as health-related quality of life (Short Form-12), perceived stress, pain and discomforts within the past two weeks, as well as the use of medication within the past two weeks.

RESULTS: Current problem gambling was strongly associated with negative outcomes such as poor mental health, high perception of stress, headache, fatigue and sleeping problems. Furthermore, previous problem gambling was generally associated with poorer health outcomes. Thus, current and previous problem gamblers had 2.36 times (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.44-3.87) and 1.66 times (95% CI 1.07-2.55) higher odds than non-problem gamblers of reporting fair or poor health, respectively. The data revealed no clear association between problem gambling and the use of analgesics.

CONCLUSIONS: Both current and previous problem gambling were negatively associated with physical and mental-health problems. Health professionals should be alert to any signs of these complicating factors when planning the treatment of problem gamblers.

Original languageEnglish
JournalScandinavian Journal of Public Health
Volume46
Issue number5
Pages (from-to)514-521
ISSN1403-4948
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2018

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Gambling
Quality of Life
Medicine
Mental Health
Health
Confidence Intervals
Tension-Type Headache
Health Surveys
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Gambling
  • analgesics
  • cross-sectional studies
  • fatigue
  • health
  • health surveys
  • pain
  • population study
  • sleep

Cite this

@article{80f5521f4c494121ac4e87a4f728ce19,
title = "A nationwide study of health-related quality of life, stress, pain or discomfort and the use of medicine among problem gamblers",
abstract = "AIM: The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between problem gambling and health-related quality of life, stress, pain or discomfort and the use of analgesics and sleeping pills.METHODS: Data derives from the Danish Health and Morbidity Survey 2010. The survey was based on a random sample of 25,000 adult Danes (response rate: 61{\%}), and data were collected via a self-administered questionnaire. The Lie/Bet Questionnaire was used as the screening instrument for problem gambling. Respondents were categorised as current, previous or non-problem gamblers. The questionnaire also included topics such as health-related quality of life (Short Form-12), perceived stress, pain and discomforts within the past two weeks, as well as the use of medication within the past two weeks.RESULTS: Current problem gambling was strongly associated with negative outcomes such as poor mental health, high perception of stress, headache, fatigue and sleeping problems. Furthermore, previous problem gambling was generally associated with poorer health outcomes. Thus, current and previous problem gamblers had 2.36 times (95{\%} confidence interval [CI] 1.44-3.87) and 1.66 times (95{\%} CI 1.07-2.55) higher odds than non-problem gamblers of reporting fair or poor health, respectively. The data revealed no clear association between problem gambling and the use of analgesics.CONCLUSIONS: Both current and previous problem gambling were negatively associated with physical and mental-health problems. Health professionals should be alert to any signs of these complicating factors when planning the treatment of problem gamblers.",
keywords = "Gambling, analgesics, cross-sectional studies, fatigue, health, health surveys, pain, population study, sleep",
author = "Ola Ekholm and Michael Davidsen and Larsen, {Christina Viskum Lytken} and Knud Juel",
year = "2018",
month = "7",
doi = "10.1177/1403494817739501",
language = "English",
volume = "46",
pages = "514--521",
journal = "Scandinavian Journal of Public Health",
issn = "1403-4948",
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T1 - A nationwide study of health-related quality of life, stress, pain or discomfort and the use of medicine among problem gamblers

AU - Ekholm, Ola

AU - Davidsen, Michael

AU - Larsen, Christina Viskum Lytken

AU - Juel, Knud

PY - 2018/7

Y1 - 2018/7

N2 - AIM: The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between problem gambling and health-related quality of life, stress, pain or discomfort and the use of analgesics and sleeping pills.METHODS: Data derives from the Danish Health and Morbidity Survey 2010. The survey was based on a random sample of 25,000 adult Danes (response rate: 61%), and data were collected via a self-administered questionnaire. The Lie/Bet Questionnaire was used as the screening instrument for problem gambling. Respondents were categorised as current, previous or non-problem gamblers. The questionnaire also included topics such as health-related quality of life (Short Form-12), perceived stress, pain and discomforts within the past two weeks, as well as the use of medication within the past two weeks.RESULTS: Current problem gambling was strongly associated with negative outcomes such as poor mental health, high perception of stress, headache, fatigue and sleeping problems. Furthermore, previous problem gambling was generally associated with poorer health outcomes. Thus, current and previous problem gamblers had 2.36 times (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.44-3.87) and 1.66 times (95% CI 1.07-2.55) higher odds than non-problem gamblers of reporting fair or poor health, respectively. The data revealed no clear association between problem gambling and the use of analgesics.CONCLUSIONS: Both current and previous problem gambling were negatively associated with physical and mental-health problems. Health professionals should be alert to any signs of these complicating factors when planning the treatment of problem gamblers.

AB - AIM: The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between problem gambling and health-related quality of life, stress, pain or discomfort and the use of analgesics and sleeping pills.METHODS: Data derives from the Danish Health and Morbidity Survey 2010. The survey was based on a random sample of 25,000 adult Danes (response rate: 61%), and data were collected via a self-administered questionnaire. The Lie/Bet Questionnaire was used as the screening instrument for problem gambling. Respondents were categorised as current, previous or non-problem gamblers. The questionnaire also included topics such as health-related quality of life (Short Form-12), perceived stress, pain and discomforts within the past two weeks, as well as the use of medication within the past two weeks.RESULTS: Current problem gambling was strongly associated with negative outcomes such as poor mental health, high perception of stress, headache, fatigue and sleeping problems. Furthermore, previous problem gambling was generally associated with poorer health outcomes. Thus, current and previous problem gamblers had 2.36 times (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.44-3.87) and 1.66 times (95% CI 1.07-2.55) higher odds than non-problem gamblers of reporting fair or poor health, respectively. The data revealed no clear association between problem gambling and the use of analgesics.CONCLUSIONS: Both current and previous problem gambling were negatively associated with physical and mental-health problems. Health professionals should be alert to any signs of these complicating factors when planning the treatment of problem gamblers.

KW - Gambling

KW - analgesics

KW - cross-sectional studies

KW - fatigue

KW - health

KW - health surveys

KW - pain

KW - population study

KW - sleep

U2 - 10.1177/1403494817739501

DO - 10.1177/1403494817739501

M3 - Journal article

VL - 46

SP - 514

EP - 521

JO - Scandinavian Journal of Public Health

JF - Scandinavian Journal of Public Health

SN - 1403-4948

IS - 5

ER -