A flock of one's own: Nordic human-mountain cattle kinship-making practices

Charlotte Kroløkke, Anne Nørkjær Bang, Ulla Ovaska, Mervi Honkatukia

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

This article employs critical cultural and anthropological perspectives to investigate the ways in which Nordic mountain cattle are kinned and become positioned as kin. It does so by empirically foregrounding photographic material, elicited from the 3MC Traditional Transboundary Cattle Breeds’ photo competition, along with photo elicited interviews with 13 of the participating photographers. Nordic mountain cattle become “kinned” as “mothers,” “family members,” “friends,” “colleagues,” and “pets” through arange of kinship-making practices such as naming, gendering, and anthropomorphiz- ing cattle with distinct human-like personalities. The article concludes by turning to the affective values and cultural logics that situate mountain cattle as forms of Nordic cultural heritage. In these entanglements, mountain cattle resurrect Nordic cultural heritage and temporality facilitating new Nordic naturecultures in which humans are simultaneously (re)connected to nature and cultivated as future (new) citizens.
Translated title of the contributionA flock of one's own: Nordic human-mountain cattle kinship-making practices
Original languageEnglish
JournalSociety & Animals
Pages (from-to)1-25
ISSN1063-1119
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 28. Feb 2024

Keywords

  • Nordic cultural heritage
  • companion animals
  • critical animal studies
  • kinship
  • mountain cattle
  • photo elicitation
  • photography

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