A cosmopolitan return to nature: How combining aesthetization and moralization processes expresses distinction in food consumption

Julie Emontspool, Carina Georgi

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

This article investigates how foodies' adoption of New Nordic Food enables them to combine aesthetic and moral cosmopolitanism ideals. It demonstrates that consumers integrate aesthetic and moral cosmopolitan discourses through two complementary processes: the re-aesthetization of nature and the re-moralization of the exotic. These processes combine in a cosmopolitan interest for one of the last unexplored foreign contexts: nature. The findings of this article contribute to existing research by showing that moral cosmopolitanism reflects a more individualized and less engaged form of consumption than ethical consumption. They illustrate how urban consumers perform distinction in contexts where nature is the most exotic unexplored context, highlighting further the reterritorialization of global cosmopolitan consumption, where food trends can only be consumed authentically in their context of origin. Finally, this article shows how moral cosmopolitanism can support consumers who acknowledge the need for ethical consumption yet struggle with its adoption.

Original languageEnglish
JournalConsumption, Markets & Culture
Volume20
Issue number4
Pages (from-to)306-328
ISSN1025-3866
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 4. Jul 2017
EventConsumer Culture Theory Conference - Fayetteville, AR, United States
Duration: 18. Jun 201521. Jun 2015
Conference number: 10

Conference

ConferenceConsumer Culture Theory Conference
Number10
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityFayetteville, AR
Period18/06/201521/06/2015

Keywords

  • Cosmopolitanism
  • Nordic
  • aesthetics
  • ethical consumption
  • food
  • foodies
  • morals
  • nature
  • restaurants

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