A 12-Week Exercise Therapy Program in Middle-Aged Patients With Degenerative Meniscus Tears: A Case Series With 1 Year Follow Up

Silje Stensrud, Ewa M. Roos, May Arna Risberg

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 STUDY DESIGN: Case Series. BACKGROUND: Exercise is a viable treatment alternative to arthroscopic partial meniscectomy in patients with degenerative meniscus tears. No study has reported in detail type of exercises, progression, tolerance, and potential benefit from an exercise therapy program in these patients who have not had surgery. This study describes a progressive exercise therapy program aiming at improving neuromuscular function and muscle strength in middle-aged patients with degenerative meniscus tears, the outcome over a 12-week period, and the ability to sustain improvements up to 1 year. CASE DESCRIPTION: The first 20 patients (age range, 38-58 years) included in an ongoing randomized controlled trial. OUTCOMES: Outcomes data included the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), a 7-point global rating of change scale, isokinetic knee muscle strength tests, and 3 lower extremity performance tests. Post intervention there were clinically meaningful changes (greater than 10 points) in 16 of 20 patients on the KOOS knee related quality of life, 19 of 20 patients rated themselves as "a lot better" or "better" on the global rating of change scale, all patients had increased quadriceps muscle strength, and the majority of patients improved on the lower extremity performance tests. At 1 year post-intervention, the majority of patients had sustained the improvements and none of the patients had undergone surgery. DISCUSSION: The described neuromuscular- and strength-training program should be considered for rehabilitation of middle-aged individuals with degenerative meniscus tears. Head-to-head comparison of programs in a randomized design is however needed to be able to answer if this specific program is significantly better than other interventions. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Therapy, level 4. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther, Epub 5 September 2012. doi:10.2519/jospt.2012.4165.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy
Volume42
Issue number11
Pages (from-to)919-31
ISSN0190-6011
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2012

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Knee Injuries
Knee Osteoarthritis
Knee
Exercise Tolerance
Resistance Training
Quadriceps Muscle
Randomized Controlled Trials
Quality of Life
Exercise
Education

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title = "A 12-Week Exercise Therapy Program in Middle-Aged Patients With Degenerative Meniscus Tears: A Case Series With 1 Year Follow Up",
abstract = "Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 STUDY DESIGN: Case Series. BACKGROUND: Exercise is a viable treatment alternative to arthroscopic partial meniscectomy in patients with degenerative meniscus tears. No study has reported in detail type of exercises, progression, tolerance, and potential benefit from an exercise therapy program in these patients who have not had surgery. This study describes a progressive exercise therapy program aiming at improving neuromuscular function and muscle strength in middle-aged patients with degenerative meniscus tears, the outcome over a 12-week period, and the ability to sustain improvements up to 1 year. CASE DESCRIPTION: The first 20 patients (age range, 38-58 years) included in an ongoing randomized controlled trial. OUTCOMES: Outcomes data included the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), a 7-point global rating of change scale, isokinetic knee muscle strength tests, and 3 lower extremity performance tests. Post intervention there were clinically meaningful changes (greater than 10 points) in 16 of 20 patients on the KOOS knee related quality of life, 19 of 20 patients rated themselves as {"}a lot better{"} or {"}better{"} on the global rating of change scale, all patients had increased quadriceps muscle strength, and the majority of patients improved on the lower extremity performance tests. At 1 year post-intervention, the majority of patients had sustained the improvements and none of the patients had undergone surgery. DISCUSSION: The described neuromuscular- and strength-training program should be considered for rehabilitation of middle-aged individuals with degenerative meniscus tears. Head-to-head comparison of programs in a randomized design is however needed to be able to answer if this specific program is significantly better than other interventions. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Therapy, level 4. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther, Epub 5 September 2012. doi:10.2519/jospt.2012.4165.",
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A 12-Week Exercise Therapy Program in Middle-Aged Patients With Degenerative Meniscus Tears : A Case Series With 1 Year Follow Up. / Stensrud, Silje; Roos, Ewa M.; Risberg, May Arna.

In: Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy, Vol. 42, No. 11, 11.2012, p. 919-31.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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