Carlsbergfondet - Audiometry in seals and diving birds

Project: Research

Description

Psychophysical studies are performed to understand the sensory and cognitive capabilities of animals. Such studies have been of tremendous importance for the last hundred years of experimental psychology and sensory physiology. Hearing studies using psychophysical techniques have been performed on a wide variety of vertebrate species, including mammals and birds1. During the past 20 years, there has been a rapid development in physiological techniques to study hearing, such as measurements of the auditory brainstem response (ABR). Even though some of these techniques have come to dominate the present work on animal hearing, psychophysical techniques are still crucial for our understanding of the overall perception of a sound stimulus.  In addition, psychophysical methods used under the right conditions will give the most reliable and biologically relevant results, for instance, when measuring hearing threshold values where physiological methods such as the ABR‐method normally produce threshold values that are  unrealistically high.

The ‘toolbox’ of psychophysics contains a large array of working tools, all of which come with several restrictions for how to use them properly to adequately interpret the data2. The animals have to be trained for the psychophysical task and therefore to be under stimulus control. In addition, the trainer has to be ignorant of the actual stimuli presented during the trials (a so‐called double blind setup). There are many choices concerning stimulus presentation, reward scheme et cetera, that must be considered before running the actual experiments.

Even though many animal species have been studied using psychophysical techniques, there are still important gaps in our understanding of the hearing abilities, especially when it comes to animals living in both air and under water, such as seals and marine birds. The hearing abilities of harbor seals in air and in water were first measured in Denmark by Møhl3, who concluded that the seal had lower hearing thresholds in water than in air. These results were recently challenged by Reichmuth et al., showing by using data  acquired in a sound‐attenuated and anechoic booth that the in‐air threshold estimates from Møhl’s3 seal most likely had been masked by ambient noise. This calls for a more careful approach when deriving in‐air audiograms in the future. The data from Reichmuth et al.4 indicates that seals may have similar hearing sensitivities in air and in water, albeit their frequency range of hearing is much wider in water than in air.

Understanding how seals and other amphibious species use their senses in the two media is important from a sensory physiology point of view, as well as for understanding how they may be affected by humaninduced noise.  We have measured masked hearing thresholds of a harbor seal outdoors as a project for  university undergraduate students on several occasions. In addition, we have established an experimental  setup for psychophysical measurements of the in‐air and underwater hearing abilities of diving marine birds. Great cormorants were used as the study subject of these studies. The in‐air thresholds were determined in an outdoor setup in the Kerteminde Harbour, and the underwater thresholds in a small underwater outdoor tank. The training and experimental setup was supervised by world‐leading experts in animal psychophysics, both for the cormorant and the harbor seal experiments. This study gave the first data of the hearing thresholds established in any marine bird5. The in‐air hearing sensitivity of the cormorant hearing in air was rather poor, and therefore it seemed not to become masked by the ambient noise. This would most likely not be the case for more sensitive species of marine birds, and certainly not  for seals.

An outdoor sound‐attenuated facility:

To continue our work on marine birds and seals, it is therefore essential to obtain a sound‐attenuated facility, where the hearing threshold can be measured under very low noise conditions.  

The suggested setup would contain a sound attenuated booth and a small control room, from where the experimenter could control the experiments and communicate and reward the animal for correct responses (see the quotation from IAC Acoustics of August 22, 2013). Our plan is to use the soundattenuated facility to study the hearing abilities of several species of penguins (e.g., Adeleide and Humboldt penguins), eider ducks, alcids (murres, puffins, et cetera). Also, during the winter 2013‐14, we will receive 2 grey seals for hearing studies. They will also be tested in the sound‐attenuated facility. The facility is to be housed on the parking lot of the Marine Biological Research Center (University of Southern Denmark) in Kerteminde, Denmark.
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date01/01/201430/06/2016