Yo-Yo intermittent tests are a valid tool for aerobic fitness assessment in recreational football

Carlo Castagna, Peter Krustrup, Susana Póvoas*

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Resumé

Purpose: To examine the suitability of three versions and two levels of the Yo-Yo intermittent tests for assessing and tracking aerobic fitness status development in male recreational football players. Sixty-six untrained participants (age 39 ± 6 years, VO2max 41.2 ± 6.2 ml kg−1 min−1, body mass 81.9 ± 10.8 kg, height 173.2 ± 6.4 cm) partook in a 12-week recreational football training program. They were evaluated during the Yo-Yo intermittent endurance level 1 (YYIE1) and 2 (YYIE2) tests and the Yo-Yo intermittent recovery level 1 test (YYIR1), and during a treadmill test for VO2max assessment, at baseline. Thirty-two out of these 66 participants replicated all these tests at post-intervention. An additional group of 30 male age-matched recreational football players that afterwards started the 12-week recreational football program (age 39 ± 6 years, VO2max 45.3 ± 5.8 ml kg−1 min−1, body mass 82.5 ± 7.8 kg, height 172.8 ± 5.4 cm) was evaluated at baseline to test cross-validation. Results: The Yo-Yo tests showed very large associations with VO2max at baseline (r = 0.75–0.77; P < 0.0001) and at post-intervention (r = 0.76–0.82; P < 0.0005). Post-training, very large associations were found between YYIE2 performance and VO2max (r = 0.65, P < 0.0001). Cross-validation revealed small to large differences between the observed and estimated VO2max values (1.5–2.96 ml kg−1 min−1) with moderate typical error of estimation (7.9–8.7%) across the tests. Performance in the YYIE1, YYIE2 and YYIR1 tests of ≥ 1760, 480 and 600 m, respectively, indicated good to excellent VO2max values. Conclusions: The Yo-Yo tests considered here showed robust and consistent criterion validity. The YYIE2 could be a more accurate option to track aerobic fitness development in recreational football players.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftEuropean Journal of Applied Physiology
Vol/bind120
Udgave nummer1
Sider (fra-til)137–147
ISSN1439-6319
DOI
StatusUdgivet - jan. 2020

Fingeraftryk

Football
Exercise Test
Education

Citer dette

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title = "Yo-Yo intermittent tests are a valid tool for aerobic fitness assessment in recreational football",
abstract = "Purpose: To examine the suitability of three versions and two levels of the Yo-Yo intermittent tests for assessing and tracking aerobic fitness status development in male recreational football players. Sixty-six untrained participants (age 39 ± 6 years, VO2max 41.2 ± 6.2 ml kg−1 min−1, body mass 81.9 ± 10.8 kg, height 173.2 ± 6.4 cm) partook in a 12-week recreational football training program. They were evaluated during the Yo-Yo intermittent endurance level 1 (YYIE1) and 2 (YYIE2) tests and the Yo-Yo intermittent recovery level 1 test (YYIR1), and during a treadmill test for VO2max assessment, at baseline. Thirty-two out of these 66 participants replicated all these tests at post-intervention. An additional group of 30 male age-matched recreational football players that afterwards started the 12-week recreational football program (age 39 ± 6 years, VO2max 45.3 ± 5.8 ml kg−1 min−1, body mass 82.5 ± 7.8 kg, height 172.8 ± 5.4 cm) was evaluated at baseline to test cross-validation. Results: The Yo-Yo tests showed very large associations with VO2max at baseline (r = 0.75–0.77; P < 0.0001) and at post-intervention (r = 0.76–0.82; P < 0.0005). Post-training, very large associations were found between YYIE2 performance and VO2max (r = 0.65, P < 0.0001). Cross-validation revealed small to large differences between the observed and estimated VO2max values (1.5–2.96 ml kg−1 min−1) with moderate typical error of estimation (7.9–8.7{\%}) across the tests. Performance in the YYIE1, YYIE2 and YYIR1 tests of ≥ 1760, 480 and 600 m, respectively, indicated good to excellent VO2max values. Conclusions: The Yo-Yo tests considered here showed robust and consistent criterion validity. The YYIE2 could be a more accurate option to track aerobic fitness development in recreational football players.",
keywords = "Endurance, Field tests, Maximal oxygen uptake, Responsiveness, Soccer, Team sports",
author = "Carlo Castagna and Peter Krustrup and Susana P{\'o}voas",
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Yo-Yo intermittent tests are a valid tool for aerobic fitness assessment in recreational football. / Castagna, Carlo; Krustrup, Peter; Póvoas, Susana.

I: European Journal of Applied Physiology, Bind 120, Nr. 1, 01.2020, s. 137–147.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Yo-Yo intermittent tests are a valid tool for aerobic fitness assessment in recreational football

AU - Castagna, Carlo

AU - Krustrup, Peter

AU - Póvoas, Susana

PY - 2020/1

Y1 - 2020/1

N2 - Purpose: To examine the suitability of three versions and two levels of the Yo-Yo intermittent tests for assessing and tracking aerobic fitness status development in male recreational football players. Sixty-six untrained participants (age 39 ± 6 years, VO2max 41.2 ± 6.2 ml kg−1 min−1, body mass 81.9 ± 10.8 kg, height 173.2 ± 6.4 cm) partook in a 12-week recreational football training program. They were evaluated during the Yo-Yo intermittent endurance level 1 (YYIE1) and 2 (YYIE2) tests and the Yo-Yo intermittent recovery level 1 test (YYIR1), and during a treadmill test for VO2max assessment, at baseline. Thirty-two out of these 66 participants replicated all these tests at post-intervention. An additional group of 30 male age-matched recreational football players that afterwards started the 12-week recreational football program (age 39 ± 6 years, VO2max 45.3 ± 5.8 ml kg−1 min−1, body mass 82.5 ± 7.8 kg, height 172.8 ± 5.4 cm) was evaluated at baseline to test cross-validation. Results: The Yo-Yo tests showed very large associations with VO2max at baseline (r = 0.75–0.77; P < 0.0001) and at post-intervention (r = 0.76–0.82; P < 0.0005). Post-training, very large associations were found between YYIE2 performance and VO2max (r = 0.65, P < 0.0001). Cross-validation revealed small to large differences between the observed and estimated VO2max values (1.5–2.96 ml kg−1 min−1) with moderate typical error of estimation (7.9–8.7%) across the tests. Performance in the YYIE1, YYIE2 and YYIR1 tests of ≥ 1760, 480 and 600 m, respectively, indicated good to excellent VO2max values. Conclusions: The Yo-Yo tests considered here showed robust and consistent criterion validity. The YYIE2 could be a more accurate option to track aerobic fitness development in recreational football players.

AB - Purpose: To examine the suitability of three versions and two levels of the Yo-Yo intermittent tests for assessing and tracking aerobic fitness status development in male recreational football players. Sixty-six untrained participants (age 39 ± 6 years, VO2max 41.2 ± 6.2 ml kg−1 min−1, body mass 81.9 ± 10.8 kg, height 173.2 ± 6.4 cm) partook in a 12-week recreational football training program. They were evaluated during the Yo-Yo intermittent endurance level 1 (YYIE1) and 2 (YYIE2) tests and the Yo-Yo intermittent recovery level 1 test (YYIR1), and during a treadmill test for VO2max assessment, at baseline. Thirty-two out of these 66 participants replicated all these tests at post-intervention. An additional group of 30 male age-matched recreational football players that afterwards started the 12-week recreational football program (age 39 ± 6 years, VO2max 45.3 ± 5.8 ml kg−1 min−1, body mass 82.5 ± 7.8 kg, height 172.8 ± 5.4 cm) was evaluated at baseline to test cross-validation. Results: The Yo-Yo tests showed very large associations with VO2max at baseline (r = 0.75–0.77; P < 0.0001) and at post-intervention (r = 0.76–0.82; P < 0.0005). Post-training, very large associations were found between YYIE2 performance and VO2max (r = 0.65, P < 0.0001). Cross-validation revealed small to large differences between the observed and estimated VO2max values (1.5–2.96 ml kg−1 min−1) with moderate typical error of estimation (7.9–8.7%) across the tests. Performance in the YYIE1, YYIE2 and YYIR1 tests of ≥ 1760, 480 and 600 m, respectively, indicated good to excellent VO2max values. Conclusions: The Yo-Yo tests considered here showed robust and consistent criterion validity. The YYIE2 could be a more accurate option to track aerobic fitness development in recreational football players.

KW - Endurance

KW - Field tests

KW - Maximal oxygen uptake

KW - Responsiveness

KW - Soccer

KW - Team sports

U2 - 10.1007/s00421-019-04258-8

DO - 10.1007/s00421-019-04258-8

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 31707477

AN - SCOPUS:85074827028

VL - 120

SP - 137

EP - 147

JO - European Journal of Applied Physiology

JF - European Journal of Applied Physiology

SN - 1439-6319

IS - 1

ER -