Why Do Policymakers Support Administrative Burdens? The Roles of Deservingness, Political Ideology, and Personal Experience

Martin Bækgaard, Donald P. Moynihan, Mette Kjærgaard Thomsen

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Abstrakt

Administrative burdens affect peoples’ experience of public administration but there is, to date, limited evidence to as why policymakers are willing to accept and impose burdens. To address this gap, we draw from the policy design and administrative burden literatures to develop the concept of burden tolerance—the willingness of policymakers and people more generally to passively allow or actively impose state actions that result in others experiencing administrative burdens. Drawing on a survey experiment and observational data with Danish local politicians in a social welfare setting, we find that more right-wing politicians are more tolerant of burdens, but politicians are less willing to impose burdens on a welfare claimant perceived as being more deserving. Politicians with a personal experience of receiving welfare benefits themselves are less tolerant of burdens, while information about the psychological costs experienced by claimants did not reduce burden tolerance.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftJournal of Public Administration Research and Theory
Vol/bind31
Udgave nummer1
Sider (fra-til)184-200
ISSN1053-1858
DOI
StatusUdgivet - jan. 2021

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