What do elderly problem drinkers aim for? Choice of goal for treatment among elderly treatment-seeking alcohol-dependent patients

Jakob Emiliussen*, Kjeld Andersen, Anette Søgaard Nielsen, Barbara Braun, Randi Bilberg

*Kontaktforfatter for dette arbejde

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Objective: The patient’s free choice of treatment goals for alcohol use disorder (AUD) is predictive for treatment outcome. Presently there is limited knowledge of whether the age at onset of AUD influences the choice of goal for treatment. The present study investigates whether there are differences in choice of treatment goal between patients with very late onset alcohol use disorder (VLO AUD ≥ 60 years) and those having early or mid-age onset of AUD (EMO AUD < 60 years). Method: Participants were 341 persons, voluntarily enrolled in the Elderly Study, who were seeking treatment for AUD in outpatient centres for alcohol treatment in Denmark. Data regarding thoughts about abstinence, alcohol use in the last 90 days, motivation for treatment and psychiatric diagnosis were collected via questionnaires. A logistics regression was used to analyse the data. Results: 32.1% of the participants with VLO AUD chose temporary abstinence goals, compared to 18.2% of the patients with earlier-onset AUD (p = 0.024). Further, 10.7% of participants with VLO AUD chose total abstinence goals compared to 31.3% of participants with early or mid-age onset AUD (p = 0.002). Conclusion: There are significant differences in choice of goal between participants with very late onset AUD and early or mid-age onset AUD. Individuals with very late onset alcohol use disorder tend to choose temporary abstinence over any other treatment goal whereas, in general, individuals with early onset alcohol use disorder choose permanent abstinence over other treatment goals.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftNordisk Alkohol- & Narkotikatidskrift
Vol/bind36
Udgave nummer6
Sider (fra-til)511-521
ISSN1455-0725
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 1. dec. 2019

Fingeraftryk

alcohol
Alcohols
Age of Onset
Denmark
Outpatients
Logistic Models
logistics
regression

Citer dette

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title = "What do elderly problem drinkers aim for? Choice of goal for treatment among elderly treatment-seeking alcohol-dependent patients",
abstract = "Objective: The patient’s free choice of treatment goals for alcohol use disorder (AUD) is predictive for treatment outcome. Presently there is limited knowledge of whether the age at onset of AUD influences the choice of goal for treatment. The present study investigates whether there are differences in choice of treatment goal between patients with very late onset alcohol use disorder (VLO AUD ≥ 60 years) and those having early or mid-age onset of AUD (EMO AUD < 60 years). Method: Participants were 341 persons, voluntarily enrolled in the Elderly Study, who were seeking treatment for AUD in outpatient centres for alcohol treatment in Denmark. Data regarding thoughts about abstinence, alcohol use in the last 90 days, motivation for treatment and psychiatric diagnosis were collected via questionnaires. A logistics regression was used to analyse the data. Results: 32.1{\%} of the participants with VLO AUD chose temporary abstinence goals, compared to 18.2{\%} of the patients with earlier-onset AUD (p = 0.024). Further, 10.7{\%} of participants with VLO AUD chose total abstinence goals compared to 31.3{\%} of participants with early or mid-age onset AUD (p = 0.002). Conclusion: There are significant differences in choice of goal between participants with very late onset AUD and early or mid-age onset AUD. Individuals with very late onset alcohol use disorder tend to choose temporary abstinence over any other treatment goal whereas, in general, individuals with early onset alcohol use disorder choose permanent abstinence over other treatment goals.",
keywords = "alcohol use disorder, older adults, randomised controlled trial, treatment goals, very late onset",
author = "Jakob Emiliussen and Kjeld Andersen and Nielsen, {Anette S{\o}gaard} and Barbara Braun and Randi Bilberg",
year = "2019",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/1455072519852852",
language = "English",
volume = "36",
pages = "511--521",
journal = "Nordisk Alkohol- & Narkotikatidskrift",
issn = "1455-0725",
publisher = "Sage Journals",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - What do elderly problem drinkers aim for? Choice of goal for treatment among elderly treatment-seeking alcohol-dependent patients

AU - Emiliussen, Jakob

AU - Andersen, Kjeld

AU - Nielsen, Anette Søgaard

AU - Braun, Barbara

AU - Bilberg, Randi

PY - 2019/12/1

Y1 - 2019/12/1

N2 - Objective: The patient’s free choice of treatment goals for alcohol use disorder (AUD) is predictive for treatment outcome. Presently there is limited knowledge of whether the age at onset of AUD influences the choice of goal for treatment. The present study investigates whether there are differences in choice of treatment goal between patients with very late onset alcohol use disorder (VLO AUD ≥ 60 years) and those having early or mid-age onset of AUD (EMO AUD < 60 years). Method: Participants were 341 persons, voluntarily enrolled in the Elderly Study, who were seeking treatment for AUD in outpatient centres for alcohol treatment in Denmark. Data regarding thoughts about abstinence, alcohol use in the last 90 days, motivation for treatment and psychiatric diagnosis were collected via questionnaires. A logistics regression was used to analyse the data. Results: 32.1% of the participants with VLO AUD chose temporary abstinence goals, compared to 18.2% of the patients with earlier-onset AUD (p = 0.024). Further, 10.7% of participants with VLO AUD chose total abstinence goals compared to 31.3% of participants with early or mid-age onset AUD (p = 0.002). Conclusion: There are significant differences in choice of goal between participants with very late onset AUD and early or mid-age onset AUD. Individuals with very late onset alcohol use disorder tend to choose temporary abstinence over any other treatment goal whereas, in general, individuals with early onset alcohol use disorder choose permanent abstinence over other treatment goals.

AB - Objective: The patient’s free choice of treatment goals for alcohol use disorder (AUD) is predictive for treatment outcome. Presently there is limited knowledge of whether the age at onset of AUD influences the choice of goal for treatment. The present study investigates whether there are differences in choice of treatment goal between patients with very late onset alcohol use disorder (VLO AUD ≥ 60 years) and those having early or mid-age onset of AUD (EMO AUD < 60 years). Method: Participants were 341 persons, voluntarily enrolled in the Elderly Study, who were seeking treatment for AUD in outpatient centres for alcohol treatment in Denmark. Data regarding thoughts about abstinence, alcohol use in the last 90 days, motivation for treatment and psychiatric diagnosis were collected via questionnaires. A logistics regression was used to analyse the data. Results: 32.1% of the participants with VLO AUD chose temporary abstinence goals, compared to 18.2% of the patients with earlier-onset AUD (p = 0.024). Further, 10.7% of participants with VLO AUD chose total abstinence goals compared to 31.3% of participants with early or mid-age onset AUD (p = 0.002). Conclusion: There are significant differences in choice of goal between participants with very late onset AUD and early or mid-age onset AUD. Individuals with very late onset alcohol use disorder tend to choose temporary abstinence over any other treatment goal whereas, in general, individuals with early onset alcohol use disorder choose permanent abstinence over other treatment goals.

KW - alcohol use disorder

KW - older adults

KW - randomised controlled trial

KW - treatment goals

KW - very late onset

U2 - 10.1177/1455072519852852

DO - 10.1177/1455072519852852

M3 - Journal article

VL - 36

SP - 511

EP - 521

JO - Nordisk Alkohol- & Narkotikatidskrift

JF - Nordisk Alkohol- & Narkotikatidskrift

SN - 1455-0725

IS - 6

ER -