We need studies of the mortality effect of vitamin A supplementation, not surveys of vitamin A deficiency

Christine Stabell Benn*

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Resumé

It is usually acknowledged that high‐dose vitamin A supplementation (VAS) provides no sustained improvement in vitamin A status, and that the effect of VAS on mortality is more likely linked to its immunomodulating effects. Nonetheless, it is widely assumed that we can deduce something about the need for continuing or stopping VAS programs based on studies of the biochemical prevalence of vitamin A deficiency (VAD). This is no longer a tenable assumption. The justification for using VAS is to reduce child mortality, but there is now doubt that VAS has any effect on overall child mortality. What we need now are not surveys of VAD, but proper randomized trials to evaluate whether VAS has beneficial effects on overall child survival.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
Artikelnummer280
TidsskriftNutrients
Vol/bind9
Udgave nummer3
Antal sider4
ISSN2072-6643
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2017

Fingeraftryk

Vitamin A Deficiency
vitamin A deficiency
vitamin A
Child Mortality
Surveys and Questionnaires
Cross-Sectional Studies

Citer dette

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abstract = "It is usually acknowledged that high‐dose vitamin A supplementation (VAS) provides no sustained improvement in vitamin A status, and that the effect of VAS on mortality is more likely linked to its immunomodulating effects. Nonetheless, it is widely assumed that we can deduce something about the need for continuing or stopping VAS programs based on studies of the biochemical prevalence of vitamin A deficiency (VAD). This is no longer a tenable assumption. The justification for using VAS is to reduce child mortality, but there is now doubt that VAS has any effect on overall child mortality. What we need now are not surveys of VAD, but proper randomized trials to evaluate whether VAS has beneficial effects on overall child survival.",
keywords = "Child mortality, Low-income countries, Vitamin A deficiency, Vitamin A supplementation",
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We need studies of the mortality effect of vitamin A supplementation, not surveys of vitamin A deficiency. / Benn, Christine Stabell.

I: Nutrients, Bind 9, Nr. 3, 280, 2017.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftLederForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - We need studies of the mortality effect of vitamin A supplementation, not surveys of vitamin A deficiency

AU - Benn, Christine Stabell

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - It is usually acknowledged that high‐dose vitamin A supplementation (VAS) provides no sustained improvement in vitamin A status, and that the effect of VAS on mortality is more likely linked to its immunomodulating effects. Nonetheless, it is widely assumed that we can deduce something about the need for continuing or stopping VAS programs based on studies of the biochemical prevalence of vitamin A deficiency (VAD). This is no longer a tenable assumption. The justification for using VAS is to reduce child mortality, but there is now doubt that VAS has any effect on overall child mortality. What we need now are not surveys of VAD, but proper randomized trials to evaluate whether VAS has beneficial effects on overall child survival.

AB - It is usually acknowledged that high‐dose vitamin A supplementation (VAS) provides no sustained improvement in vitamin A status, and that the effect of VAS on mortality is more likely linked to its immunomodulating effects. Nonetheless, it is widely assumed that we can deduce something about the need for continuing or stopping VAS programs based on studies of the biochemical prevalence of vitamin A deficiency (VAD). This is no longer a tenable assumption. The justification for using VAS is to reduce child mortality, but there is now doubt that VAS has any effect on overall child mortality. What we need now are not surveys of VAD, but proper randomized trials to evaluate whether VAS has beneficial effects on overall child survival.

KW - Child mortality

KW - Low-income countries

KW - Vitamin A deficiency

KW - Vitamin A supplementation

U2 - 10.3390/nu9030280

DO - 10.3390/nu9030280

M3 - Editorial

VL - 9

JO - Nutrients

JF - Nutrients

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ER -