Vitamin D and diabetes: its importance for beta cell and immune function

Heidi Wolden-Kirk, Lut Overbergh, Henrik Thybo Christesen, Klaus Brusgaard, Chantal Mathieu

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Experimental evidence indicates that vitamin D may play a role in the defense against type 1 diabetes (T1D) as well as type 2 diabetes (T2D). Epidemiological data have established a link between vitamin D deficiency and an increased incidence of both T1D and T2D, whereas early and long-term vitamin D supplementation may decrease the risk of these disorders. The protective effects of vitamin D are mediated through the regulation of several components such as the immune system and calcium homeostasis. However, an increasing amount of evidence suggests that vitamin D also affects beta cells directly thereby rendering them more resistant to the types of cellular stress encountered during T1D and T2D. This review evaluates the role of vitamin D signaling in the pathogenesis of T1D and T2D with a special emphasis on the direct effects of vitamin D on pancreatic beta cells.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftMolecular and Cellular Endocrinology
Vol/bind347
Udgave nummer1-2
Sider (fra-til)106-120
Antal sider15
ISSN0303-7207
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2011

Citer dette

@article{06874454ac36474081c393406be1baf9,
title = "Vitamin D and diabetes: its importance for beta cell and immune function",
abstract = "Experimental evidence indicates that vitamin D may play a role in the defense against type 1 diabetes (T1D) as well as type 2 diabetes (T2D). Epidemiological data have established a link between vitamin D deficiency and an increased incidence of both T1D and T2D, whereas early and long-term vitamin D supplementation may decrease the risk of these disorders. The protective effects of vitamin D are mediated through the regulation of several components such as the immune system and calcium homeostasis. However, an increasing amount of evidence suggests that vitamin D also affects beta cells directly thereby rendering them more resistant to the types of cellular stress encountered during T1D and T2D. This review evaluates the role of vitamin D signaling in the pathogenesis of T1D and T2D with a special emphasis on the direct effects of vitamin D on pancreatic beta cells.",
keywords = "Animals, Clinical Trials as Topic, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Humans, Insulin, Insulin-Secreting Cells, Mice, Models, Immunological, Mononuclear Phagocyte System, NF-kappa B, Vitamin D, Vitamin D Deficiency",
author = "Heidi Wolden-Kirk and Lut Overbergh and Christesen, {Henrik Thybo} and Klaus Brusgaard and Chantal Mathieu",
note = "Copyright {\circledC} 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.",
year = "2011",
doi = "10.1016/j.mce.2011.08.016",
language = "English",
volume = "347",
pages = "106--120",
journal = "Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology",
issn = "0303-7207",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "1-2",

}

Vitamin D and diabetes : its importance for beta cell and immune function. / Wolden-Kirk, Heidi; Overbergh, Lut; Christesen, Henrik Thybo; Brusgaard, Klaus; Mathieu, Chantal.

I: Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology, Bind 347, Nr. 1-2, 2011, s. 106-120.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Vitamin D and diabetes

T2 - its importance for beta cell and immune function

AU - Wolden-Kirk, Heidi

AU - Overbergh, Lut

AU - Christesen, Henrik Thybo

AU - Brusgaard, Klaus

AU - Mathieu, Chantal

N1 - Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

PY - 2011

Y1 - 2011

N2 - Experimental evidence indicates that vitamin D may play a role in the defense against type 1 diabetes (T1D) as well as type 2 diabetes (T2D). Epidemiological data have established a link between vitamin D deficiency and an increased incidence of both T1D and T2D, whereas early and long-term vitamin D supplementation may decrease the risk of these disorders. The protective effects of vitamin D are mediated through the regulation of several components such as the immune system and calcium homeostasis. However, an increasing amount of evidence suggests that vitamin D also affects beta cells directly thereby rendering them more resistant to the types of cellular stress encountered during T1D and T2D. This review evaluates the role of vitamin D signaling in the pathogenesis of T1D and T2D with a special emphasis on the direct effects of vitamin D on pancreatic beta cells.

AB - Experimental evidence indicates that vitamin D may play a role in the defense against type 1 diabetes (T1D) as well as type 2 diabetes (T2D). Epidemiological data have established a link between vitamin D deficiency and an increased incidence of both T1D and T2D, whereas early and long-term vitamin D supplementation may decrease the risk of these disorders. The protective effects of vitamin D are mediated through the regulation of several components such as the immune system and calcium homeostasis. However, an increasing amount of evidence suggests that vitamin D also affects beta cells directly thereby rendering them more resistant to the types of cellular stress encountered during T1D and T2D. This review evaluates the role of vitamin D signaling in the pathogenesis of T1D and T2D with a special emphasis on the direct effects of vitamin D on pancreatic beta cells.

KW - Animals

KW - Clinical Trials as Topic

KW - Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1

KW - Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2

KW - Humans

KW - Insulin

KW - Insulin-Secreting Cells

KW - Mice

KW - Models, Immunological

KW - Mononuclear Phagocyte System

KW - NF-kappa B

KW - Vitamin D

KW - Vitamin D Deficiency

U2 - 10.1016/j.mce.2011.08.016

DO - 10.1016/j.mce.2011.08.016

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 21889571

VL - 347

SP - 106

EP - 120

JO - Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology

JF - Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology

SN - 0303-7207

IS - 1-2

ER -