Vinyl Record

A Cultural Icon

Dominik Bartmanski , Ian Woodward

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

In this paper, we use the case of the vinyl record to show that iconic objects become meaningful via a dual process. First, they offer immersive engagements which structure user interpretations through various material experiences of handling, use, and extension. Second, they always work via entanglements with related material ecologies such as turntables, speakers, mixers, and rituals of object care. Additionally, these engagements are complimented by a mediation process which emplaces the vinyl historically, culturally, spatially, and also politically, especially in the context of digitalization. This relational process means that both the material affordances and entanglements of vinyl allow us to feel, handle, experience, project, and share its iconicity. The materially mediated meanings of vinyl enabled it to retain currency in independent and collector’s markets and thus resist the planned obsolescence and eventually attain the status of celebrity commodity with totemic power in music communities. This performative aspect of vinyl markets also means that consumers read closely the signals and symbols regarding vinyl’s status, as its various user groups and champions try to interpret its future, protect, or challenge its current position. Vinyl’s future, and the larger expansion of pressing plants and innovative turntable production around it, largely depend on processes of cultural and status mobility. In the current phase of market expansion, vinyl’s status might be challenged by its own success. Neither a fashion cycle phenomenon, nor simple market conditions explain vinyl’s longevity. Rather, cultural contextualization of vinyl as thing and commodity is crucial for avoiding symbolic pollution and retaining sacred aura.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftConsumption, Markets & Culture
Vol/bind21
Udgave nummer2
Sider (fra-til)171-177
ISSN1025-3866
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 4. mar. 2018

Fingeraftryk

Ceremonial Behavior
Music
Ecology
market
planned obsolescence
commodity
digitalization
VIP
currency
mediation
ecology
religious behavior
symbol
experience
music
interpretation
Handling (Psychology)
Power (Psychology)
Icon
community

Citer dette

Bartmanski , Dominik ; Woodward, Ian. / Vinyl Record : A Cultural Icon. I: Consumption, Markets & Culture. 2018 ; Bind 21, Nr. 2. s. 171-177.
@article{6535ba46080144b180196da98d60b9f6,
title = "Vinyl Record: A Cultural Icon",
abstract = "In this paper, we use the case of the vinyl record to show that iconic objects become meaningful via a dual process. First, they offer immersive engagements which structure user interpretations through various material experiences of handling, use, and extension. Second, they always work via entanglements with related material ecologies such as turntables, speakers, mixers, and rituals of object care. Additionally, these engagements are complimented by a mediation process which emplaces the vinyl historically, culturally, spatially, and also politically, especially in the context of digitalization. This relational process means that both the material affordances and entanglements of vinyl allow us to feel, handle, experience, project, and share its iconicity. The materially mediated meanings of vinyl enabled it to retain currency in independent and collector’s markets and thus resist the planned obsolescence and eventually attain the status of celebrity commodity with totemic power in music communities. This performative aspect of vinyl markets also means that consumers read closely the signals and symbols regarding vinyl’s status, as its various user groups and champions try to interpret its future, protect, or challenge its current position. Vinyl’s future, and the larger expansion of pressing plants and innovative turntable production around it, largely depend on processes of cultural and status mobility. In the current phase of market expansion, vinyl’s status might be challenged by its own success. Neither a fashion cycle phenomenon, nor simple market conditions explain vinyl’s longevity. Rather, cultural contextualization of vinyl as thing and commodity is crucial for avoiding symbolic pollution and retaining sacred aura.",
keywords = "vinyl record , iconicity , heritage , aura, materiality , entanglement, marketplace icon, music, heritage, Vinyl record, materiality, iconicity",
author = "Dominik Bartmanski and Ian Woodward",
year = "2018",
month = "3",
day = "4",
doi = "10.1080/10253866.2016.1212709",
language = "English",
volume = "21",
pages = "171--177",
journal = "Consumption, Markets & Culture",
issn = "1025-3866",
publisher = "Heinemann",
number = "2",

}

Vinyl Record : A Cultural Icon. / Bartmanski , Dominik; Woodward, Ian.

I: Consumption, Markets & Culture, Bind 21, Nr. 2, 04.03.2018, s. 171-177.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Vinyl Record

T2 - A Cultural Icon

AU - Bartmanski , Dominik

AU - Woodward, Ian

PY - 2018/3/4

Y1 - 2018/3/4

N2 - In this paper, we use the case of the vinyl record to show that iconic objects become meaningful via a dual process. First, they offer immersive engagements which structure user interpretations through various material experiences of handling, use, and extension. Second, they always work via entanglements with related material ecologies such as turntables, speakers, mixers, and rituals of object care. Additionally, these engagements are complimented by a mediation process which emplaces the vinyl historically, culturally, spatially, and also politically, especially in the context of digitalization. This relational process means that both the material affordances and entanglements of vinyl allow us to feel, handle, experience, project, and share its iconicity. The materially mediated meanings of vinyl enabled it to retain currency in independent and collector’s markets and thus resist the planned obsolescence and eventually attain the status of celebrity commodity with totemic power in music communities. This performative aspect of vinyl markets also means that consumers read closely the signals and symbols regarding vinyl’s status, as its various user groups and champions try to interpret its future, protect, or challenge its current position. Vinyl’s future, and the larger expansion of pressing plants and innovative turntable production around it, largely depend on processes of cultural and status mobility. In the current phase of market expansion, vinyl’s status might be challenged by its own success. Neither a fashion cycle phenomenon, nor simple market conditions explain vinyl’s longevity. Rather, cultural contextualization of vinyl as thing and commodity is crucial for avoiding symbolic pollution and retaining sacred aura.

AB - In this paper, we use the case of the vinyl record to show that iconic objects become meaningful via a dual process. First, they offer immersive engagements which structure user interpretations through various material experiences of handling, use, and extension. Second, they always work via entanglements with related material ecologies such as turntables, speakers, mixers, and rituals of object care. Additionally, these engagements are complimented by a mediation process which emplaces the vinyl historically, culturally, spatially, and also politically, especially in the context of digitalization. This relational process means that both the material affordances and entanglements of vinyl allow us to feel, handle, experience, project, and share its iconicity. The materially mediated meanings of vinyl enabled it to retain currency in independent and collector’s markets and thus resist the planned obsolescence and eventually attain the status of celebrity commodity with totemic power in music communities. This performative aspect of vinyl markets also means that consumers read closely the signals and symbols regarding vinyl’s status, as its various user groups and champions try to interpret its future, protect, or challenge its current position. Vinyl’s future, and the larger expansion of pressing plants and innovative turntable production around it, largely depend on processes of cultural and status mobility. In the current phase of market expansion, vinyl’s status might be challenged by its own success. Neither a fashion cycle phenomenon, nor simple market conditions explain vinyl’s longevity. Rather, cultural contextualization of vinyl as thing and commodity is crucial for avoiding symbolic pollution and retaining sacred aura.

KW - vinyl record

KW - iconicity

KW - heritage

KW - aura

KW - materiality

KW - entanglement

KW - marketplace icon

KW - music

KW - heritage

KW - Vinyl record

KW - materiality

KW - iconicity

U2 - 10.1080/10253866.2016.1212709

DO - 10.1080/10253866.2016.1212709

M3 - Journal article

VL - 21

SP - 171

EP - 177

JO - Consumption, Markets & Culture

JF - Consumption, Markets & Culture

SN - 1025-3866

IS - 2

ER -