Urinary incontinence and its relation to delivery circumstances: A population-based study from rural Kilimanjaro, Tanzania

Gileard G. Masenga*, Benjamin C. Shayo, Sia Msuya, Vibeke Rasch

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Resumé

Objectives To investigate the prevalence and risk factors of urinary incontinence (UI), the different UI subtypes and the association between UI and delivery circumstances. Design Cross-sectional population-based study conducted in Kilimanjaro Region, Tanzania. Participants and settings 1048 women aged 18–90 women living in rural Kilimanjaro. Simple random sampling was done to select villages, households and participants. Community health workers helped in identifying eligible women and trained nurses/midwives conducted face-to-face interviews. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and Univariate and Multivariate logistic regression modelling. Results The overall prevalence rate of UI was 42%. When focusing on the different types of UI, 17% of the women had stress UI, 9% had urge UI and 16% had mixed UI. Only one woman (0.1%) with vesico-vaginal fistula was identified. UI was found to be significantly associated with increasing parity (OR = 2.41 (1.55–3.74). In addition, women who in relation to their first delivery had delivered at home or had been in labour for more than 24 hours, had increased adjusted ORs of 1.70(1.08–2.68) and 2.10(1.08–4.10), respectively, for having UI. Conclusion UI is common in rural Tanzania and of the subtypes of UI, Stress Urinary Incontinence (SUI) is the commonest followed by Mixed Urinary Incontinence (MUI). Home delivery, prolonged labour and increasing parity especially having 5 or more deliveries are associated with increased risk for developing UI.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
Artikelnummere0208733
TidsskriftPLOS ONE
Vol/bind14
Udgave nummer1
Antal sider12
ISSN1932-6203
DOI
StatusUdgivet - jan. 2019

Fingeraftryk

Tanzania
Personnel
Population
Logistics
Health
Statistics
Sampling
Stress Urinary Incontinence
Parity
urinary incontinence
Vesicovaginal Fistula
Nurse Midwives
Urge Urinary Incontinence
labor
community health workers
midwives
fistula
nurses
Logistic Models
Interviews

Citer dette

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title = "Urinary incontinence and its relation to delivery circumstances: A population-based study from rural Kilimanjaro, Tanzania",
abstract = "Objectives To investigate the prevalence and risk factors of urinary incontinence (UI), the different UI subtypes and the association between UI and delivery circumstances. Design Cross-sectional population-based study conducted in Kilimanjaro Region, Tanzania. Participants and settings 1048 women aged 18–90 women living in rural Kilimanjaro. Simple random sampling was done to select villages, households and participants. Community health workers helped in identifying eligible women and trained nurses/midwives conducted face-to-face interviews. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and Univariate and Multivariate logistic regression modelling. Results The overall prevalence rate of UI was 42{\%}. When focusing on the different types of UI, 17{\%} of the women had stress UI, 9{\%} had urge UI and 16{\%} had mixed UI. Only one woman (0.1{\%}) with vesico-vaginal fistula was identified. UI was found to be significantly associated with increasing parity (OR = 2.41 (1.55–3.74). In addition, women who in relation to their first delivery had delivered at home or had been in labour for more than 24 hours, had increased adjusted ORs of 1.70(1.08–2.68) and 2.10(1.08–4.10), respectively, for having UI. Conclusion UI is common in rural Tanzania and of the subtypes of UI, Stress Urinary Incontinence (SUI) is the commonest followed by Mixed Urinary Incontinence (MUI). Home delivery, prolonged labour and increasing parity especially having 5 or more deliveries are associated with increased risk for developing UI.",
author = "Masenga, {Gileard G.} and Shayo, {Benjamin C.} and Sia Msuya and Vibeke Rasch",
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Urinary incontinence and its relation to delivery circumstances : A population-based study from rural Kilimanjaro, Tanzania. / Masenga, Gileard G.; Shayo, Benjamin C.; Msuya, Sia; Rasch, Vibeke.

I: PLOS ONE, Bind 14, Nr. 1, e0208733, 01.2019.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Urinary incontinence and its relation to delivery circumstances

T2 - A population-based study from rural Kilimanjaro, Tanzania

AU - Masenga, Gileard G.

AU - Shayo, Benjamin C.

AU - Msuya, Sia

AU - Rasch, Vibeke

PY - 2019/1

Y1 - 2019/1

N2 - Objectives To investigate the prevalence and risk factors of urinary incontinence (UI), the different UI subtypes and the association between UI and delivery circumstances. Design Cross-sectional population-based study conducted in Kilimanjaro Region, Tanzania. Participants and settings 1048 women aged 18–90 women living in rural Kilimanjaro. Simple random sampling was done to select villages, households and participants. Community health workers helped in identifying eligible women and trained nurses/midwives conducted face-to-face interviews. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and Univariate and Multivariate logistic regression modelling. Results The overall prevalence rate of UI was 42%. When focusing on the different types of UI, 17% of the women had stress UI, 9% had urge UI and 16% had mixed UI. Only one woman (0.1%) with vesico-vaginal fistula was identified. UI was found to be significantly associated with increasing parity (OR = 2.41 (1.55–3.74). In addition, women who in relation to their first delivery had delivered at home or had been in labour for more than 24 hours, had increased adjusted ORs of 1.70(1.08–2.68) and 2.10(1.08–4.10), respectively, for having UI. Conclusion UI is common in rural Tanzania and of the subtypes of UI, Stress Urinary Incontinence (SUI) is the commonest followed by Mixed Urinary Incontinence (MUI). Home delivery, prolonged labour and increasing parity especially having 5 or more deliveries are associated with increased risk for developing UI.

AB - Objectives To investigate the prevalence and risk factors of urinary incontinence (UI), the different UI subtypes and the association between UI and delivery circumstances. Design Cross-sectional population-based study conducted in Kilimanjaro Region, Tanzania. Participants and settings 1048 women aged 18–90 women living in rural Kilimanjaro. Simple random sampling was done to select villages, households and participants. Community health workers helped in identifying eligible women and trained nurses/midwives conducted face-to-face interviews. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and Univariate and Multivariate logistic regression modelling. Results The overall prevalence rate of UI was 42%. When focusing on the different types of UI, 17% of the women had stress UI, 9% had urge UI and 16% had mixed UI. Only one woman (0.1%) with vesico-vaginal fistula was identified. UI was found to be significantly associated with increasing parity (OR = 2.41 (1.55–3.74). In addition, women who in relation to their first delivery had delivered at home or had been in labour for more than 24 hours, had increased adjusted ORs of 1.70(1.08–2.68) and 2.10(1.08–4.10), respectively, for having UI. Conclusion UI is common in rural Tanzania and of the subtypes of UI, Stress Urinary Incontinence (SUI) is the commonest followed by Mixed Urinary Incontinence (MUI). Home delivery, prolonged labour and increasing parity especially having 5 or more deliveries are associated with increased risk for developing UI.

U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0208733

DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0208733

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 30673696

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VL - 14

JO - P L o S One

JF - P L o S One

SN - 1932-6203

IS - 1

M1 - e0208733

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