Up-front F18-FDG PET/CT in suspected salivary gland carcinoma

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Objective: To investigate whether a 18F-FDG PET/CT (PET/CT)-based diagnostic strategy adds decisive new information compared to conventional imaging in the evaluation of salivary gland tumours and the detection of cervical lymph node metastases, distant metastases, and synchronous cancer in patients with salivary gland carcinoma. Methods: The study was a blinded prospective cohort study. Data were collected consecutively through almost 3 years. All patients underwent conventional imaging—magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and chest X-ray (CXR)—in addition to PET/CT prior to surgery. Final diagnosis was obtained by histopathology. MRI/CXR and PET/CT were interpreted separately by experienced radiologists and nuclear medicine physicians. Interpretation included evaluation of tumour site, cervical lymph node metastases, distant metastases, and synchronous cancer. Results: Ninety-one patients were included in the study. Thirty-three patients had primary salivary gland carcinoma and eight had cervical lymph node metastases. With PET/CT, the sensitivity was 92% and specificity 29% regarding tumour site. With MRI/CXR, the sensitivity and specificity were 90% and 26%, respectively. Regarding cervical lymph node metastases in patients with salivary gland carcinoma, the sensitivity with PET/CT was 100% and with MRI/CXR 50%. PET/CT diagnosed distant metastases in five patients, while MRI/CXR detected these in two patients. Finally, PET/CT diagnosed two synchronous cancers, whereas MRI/CXR did not detect any synchronous cancers. Conclusions: Compared with MRI/CXR PET/CT did not improve discrimination of benign from malignant salivary gland lesions. However, PET/CT may be advantageous in primary staging and in the detection of distant metastases and synchronous cancers.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftAnnals of Nuclear Medicine
Vol/bind33
Udgave nummer8
Sider (fra-til)554-563
ISSN0914-7187
DOI
StatusUdgivet - aug. 2019

Fingeraftryk

X-Rays
Lymph Nodes
Neoplasms
Glandular and Epithelial Neoplasms
Nuclear Medicine
Fluorodeoxyglucose F18
Cohort Studies
Prospective Studies
Physicians

Citer dette

@article{6545db16335440ba84569ee35cc853cb,
title = "Up-front F18-FDG PET/CT in suspected salivary gland carcinoma",
abstract = "Objective: To investigate whether a 18F-FDG PET/CT (PET/CT)-based diagnostic strategy adds decisive new information compared to conventional imaging in the evaluation of salivary gland tumours and the detection of cervical lymph node metastases, distant metastases, and synchronous cancer in patients with salivary gland carcinoma. Methods: The study was a blinded prospective cohort study. Data were collected consecutively through almost 3 years. All patients underwent conventional imaging—magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and chest X-ray (CXR)—in addition to PET/CT prior to surgery. Final diagnosis was obtained by histopathology. MRI/CXR and PET/CT were interpreted separately by experienced radiologists and nuclear medicine physicians. Interpretation included evaluation of tumour site, cervical lymph node metastases, distant metastases, and synchronous cancer. Results: Ninety-one patients were included in the study. Thirty-three patients had primary salivary gland carcinoma and eight had cervical lymph node metastases. With PET/CT, the sensitivity was 92{\%} and specificity 29{\%} regarding tumour site. With MRI/CXR, the sensitivity and specificity were 90{\%} and 26{\%}, respectively. Regarding cervical lymph node metastases in patients with salivary gland carcinoma, the sensitivity with PET/CT was 100{\%} and with MRI/CXR 50{\%}. PET/CT diagnosed distant metastases in five patients, while MRI/CXR detected these in two patients. Finally, PET/CT diagnosed two synchronous cancers, whereas MRI/CXR did not detect any synchronous cancers. Conclusions: Compared with MRI/CXR PET/CT did not improve discrimination of benign from malignant salivary gland lesions. However, PET/CT may be advantageous in primary staging and in the detection of distant metastases and synchronous cancers.",
keywords = "Diagnostic imaging, PET/CT, Salivary gland carcinoma, Salivary gland tumours, Staging",
author = "Marie Westergaard-Nielsen and Max Rohde and Christian Godballe and Eriksen, {Jesper G.} and Larsen, {Stine Rosenkilde} and Oke Gerke and Nina Nguyen and Nielsen, {Mie K.} and Nielsen, {Anne L.} and Anders Thomassen and Asmussen, {Jon T.} and Anabel Diaz and H{\o}ilund-Carlsen, {Poul Flemming} and Kristine Bj{\o}rndal",
year = "2019",
month = "8",
doi = "10.1007/s12149-019-01362-9",
language = "English",
volume = "33",
pages = "554--563",
journal = "Annals of Nuclear Medicine",
issn = "0914-7187",
publisher = "Springer",
number = "8",

}

Up-front F18-FDG PET/CT in suspected salivary gland carcinoma. / Westergaard-Nielsen, Marie; Rohde, Max; Godballe, Christian; Eriksen, Jesper G.; Larsen, Stine Rosenkilde; Gerke, Oke; Nguyen, Nina; Nielsen, Mie K.; Nielsen, Anne L.; Thomassen, Anders; Asmussen, Jon T.; Diaz, Anabel; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming; Bjørndal, Kristine.

I: Annals of Nuclear Medicine, Bind 33, Nr. 8, 08.2019, s. 554-563.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Up-front F18-FDG PET/CT in suspected salivary gland carcinoma

AU - Westergaard-Nielsen, Marie

AU - Rohde, Max

AU - Godballe, Christian

AU - Eriksen, Jesper G.

AU - Larsen, Stine Rosenkilde

AU - Gerke, Oke

AU - Nguyen, Nina

AU - Nielsen, Mie K.

AU - Nielsen, Anne L.

AU - Thomassen, Anders

AU - Asmussen, Jon T.

AU - Diaz, Anabel

AU - Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming

AU - Bjørndal, Kristine

PY - 2019/8

Y1 - 2019/8

N2 - Objective: To investigate whether a 18F-FDG PET/CT (PET/CT)-based diagnostic strategy adds decisive new information compared to conventional imaging in the evaluation of salivary gland tumours and the detection of cervical lymph node metastases, distant metastases, and synchronous cancer in patients with salivary gland carcinoma. Methods: The study was a blinded prospective cohort study. Data were collected consecutively through almost 3 years. All patients underwent conventional imaging—magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and chest X-ray (CXR)—in addition to PET/CT prior to surgery. Final diagnosis was obtained by histopathology. MRI/CXR and PET/CT were interpreted separately by experienced radiologists and nuclear medicine physicians. Interpretation included evaluation of tumour site, cervical lymph node metastases, distant metastases, and synchronous cancer. Results: Ninety-one patients were included in the study. Thirty-three patients had primary salivary gland carcinoma and eight had cervical lymph node metastases. With PET/CT, the sensitivity was 92% and specificity 29% regarding tumour site. With MRI/CXR, the sensitivity and specificity were 90% and 26%, respectively. Regarding cervical lymph node metastases in patients with salivary gland carcinoma, the sensitivity with PET/CT was 100% and with MRI/CXR 50%. PET/CT diagnosed distant metastases in five patients, while MRI/CXR detected these in two patients. Finally, PET/CT diagnosed two synchronous cancers, whereas MRI/CXR did not detect any synchronous cancers. Conclusions: Compared with MRI/CXR PET/CT did not improve discrimination of benign from malignant salivary gland lesions. However, PET/CT may be advantageous in primary staging and in the detection of distant metastases and synchronous cancers.

AB - Objective: To investigate whether a 18F-FDG PET/CT (PET/CT)-based diagnostic strategy adds decisive new information compared to conventional imaging in the evaluation of salivary gland tumours and the detection of cervical lymph node metastases, distant metastases, and synchronous cancer in patients with salivary gland carcinoma. Methods: The study was a blinded prospective cohort study. Data were collected consecutively through almost 3 years. All patients underwent conventional imaging—magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and chest X-ray (CXR)—in addition to PET/CT prior to surgery. Final diagnosis was obtained by histopathology. MRI/CXR and PET/CT were interpreted separately by experienced radiologists and nuclear medicine physicians. Interpretation included evaluation of tumour site, cervical lymph node metastases, distant metastases, and synchronous cancer. Results: Ninety-one patients were included in the study. Thirty-three patients had primary salivary gland carcinoma and eight had cervical lymph node metastases. With PET/CT, the sensitivity was 92% and specificity 29% regarding tumour site. With MRI/CXR, the sensitivity and specificity were 90% and 26%, respectively. Regarding cervical lymph node metastases in patients with salivary gland carcinoma, the sensitivity with PET/CT was 100% and with MRI/CXR 50%. PET/CT diagnosed distant metastases in five patients, while MRI/CXR detected these in two patients. Finally, PET/CT diagnosed two synchronous cancers, whereas MRI/CXR did not detect any synchronous cancers. Conclusions: Compared with MRI/CXR PET/CT did not improve discrimination of benign from malignant salivary gland lesions. However, PET/CT may be advantageous in primary staging and in the detection of distant metastases and synchronous cancers.

KW - Diagnostic imaging

KW - PET/CT

KW - Salivary gland carcinoma

KW - Salivary gland tumours

KW - Staging

U2 - 10.1007/s12149-019-01362-9

DO - 10.1007/s12149-019-01362-9

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 31102059

AN - SCOPUS:85066025585

VL - 33

SP - 554

EP - 563

JO - Annals of Nuclear Medicine

JF - Annals of Nuclear Medicine

SN - 0914-7187

IS - 8

ER -