Type D personality is associated with impaired health-related quality of life 7 years following heart transplantation

Susanne S. Pedersen*, Pieter G. Holkamp, Kadir Caliskan, Ron T. van Domburg, Ruud A.M. Erdman, Aggie H.M.M. Balk

*Kontaktforfatter for dette arbejde

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Objective: Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) following transplantation is gaining importance as an endpoint, but little is known about the role of normal personality traits as a determinant of HRQoL in this patient group. We investigated whether Type D personality (tendency to experience increased negative emotions paired with the nonexpression of these emotions) was associated with impaired HRQoL in heart transplant recipients. Methods: Data were collected from all surviving heart transplant recipients ≥21 years of age (n=186) with a mean (S.D.) of 7 (5) years following transplantation. Patients completed the Short-Form Health Survey 36 (SF-36) and the Type D Scale (DS14). Clinical data were obtained from the medical records. Results: Of the 186 patients, 18% had a Type D personality. Type D patients had significantly worse scores on the Physical Component scale (PCS) (P=.04) and the Mental Component scale (MCS) (P<.001) of the SF-36 and all the SF-36 subdomains (all P<.01) compared with non-Type D patients, except for Bodily Pain. Type D personality remained an independent determinant of impaired PCS [odds ratio (OR), 3.62; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.25-10.45] and MCS (OR, 6.13; 95% CI, 2.23-16.83) and six of the eight subscales of the SF-36, adjusting for demographic and clinical characteristics. Conclusions: Type D personality was associated with more than a three- to six-fold increased risk of impaired HRQoL in heart transplant recipients, showing that the Type D personality construct also has value in heart transplant recipients. The adoption of a personality approach may lead to improved risk stratification in research and clinical practice in this patient group.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftJournal of Psychosomatic Research
Vol/bind61
Udgave nummer6
Sider (fra-til)791-795
Antal sider5
ISSN0022-3999
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 1. dec. 2006

Fingeraftryk

Type D Personality
Quality of Life
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Health Surveys
Medical Records

Citer dette

Pedersen, Susanne S. ; Holkamp, Pieter G. ; Caliskan, Kadir ; van Domburg, Ron T. ; Erdman, Ruud A.M. ; Balk, Aggie H.M.M. / Type D personality is associated with impaired health-related quality of life 7 years following heart transplantation. I: Journal of Psychosomatic Research. 2006 ; Bind 61, Nr. 6. s. 791-795.
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title = "Type D personality is associated with impaired health-related quality of life 7 years following heart transplantation",
abstract = "Objective: Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) following transplantation is gaining importance as an endpoint, but little is known about the role of normal personality traits as a determinant of HRQoL in this patient group. We investigated whether Type D personality (tendency to experience increased negative emotions paired with the nonexpression of these emotions) was associated with impaired HRQoL in heart transplant recipients. Methods: Data were collected from all surviving heart transplant recipients ≥21 years of age (n=186) with a mean (S.D.) of 7 (5) years following transplantation. Patients completed the Short-Form Health Survey 36 (SF-36) and the Type D Scale (DS14). Clinical data were obtained from the medical records. Results: Of the 186 patients, 18{\%} had a Type D personality. Type D patients had significantly worse scores on the Physical Component scale (PCS) (P=.04) and the Mental Component scale (MCS) (P<.001) of the SF-36 and all the SF-36 subdomains (all P<.01) compared with non-Type D patients, except for Bodily Pain. Type D personality remained an independent determinant of impaired PCS [odds ratio (OR), 3.62; 95{\%} confidence interval (CI), 1.25-10.45] and MCS (OR, 6.13; 95{\%} CI, 2.23-16.83) and six of the eight subscales of the SF-36, adjusting for demographic and clinical characteristics. Conclusions: Type D personality was associated with more than a three- to six-fold increased risk of impaired HRQoL in heart transplant recipients, showing that the Type D personality construct also has value in heart transplant recipients. The adoption of a personality approach may lead to improved risk stratification in research and clinical practice in this patient group.",
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author = "Pedersen, {Susanne S.} and Holkamp, {Pieter G.} and Kadir Caliskan and {van Domburg}, {Ron T.} and Erdman, {Ruud A.M.} and Balk, {Aggie H.M.M.}",
year = "2006",
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Type D personality is associated with impaired health-related quality of life 7 years following heart transplantation. / Pedersen, Susanne S.; Holkamp, Pieter G.; Caliskan, Kadir; van Domburg, Ron T.; Erdman, Ruud A.M.; Balk, Aggie H.M.M.

I: Journal of Psychosomatic Research, Bind 61, Nr. 6, 01.12.2006, s. 791-795.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Type D personality is associated with impaired health-related quality of life 7 years following heart transplantation

AU - Pedersen, Susanne S.

AU - Holkamp, Pieter G.

AU - Caliskan, Kadir

AU - van Domburg, Ron T.

AU - Erdman, Ruud A.M.

AU - Balk, Aggie H.M.M.

PY - 2006/12/1

Y1 - 2006/12/1

N2 - Objective: Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) following transplantation is gaining importance as an endpoint, but little is known about the role of normal personality traits as a determinant of HRQoL in this patient group. We investigated whether Type D personality (tendency to experience increased negative emotions paired with the nonexpression of these emotions) was associated with impaired HRQoL in heart transplant recipients. Methods: Data were collected from all surviving heart transplant recipients ≥21 years of age (n=186) with a mean (S.D.) of 7 (5) years following transplantation. Patients completed the Short-Form Health Survey 36 (SF-36) and the Type D Scale (DS14). Clinical data were obtained from the medical records. Results: Of the 186 patients, 18% had a Type D personality. Type D patients had significantly worse scores on the Physical Component scale (PCS) (P=.04) and the Mental Component scale (MCS) (P<.001) of the SF-36 and all the SF-36 subdomains (all P<.01) compared with non-Type D patients, except for Bodily Pain. Type D personality remained an independent determinant of impaired PCS [odds ratio (OR), 3.62; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.25-10.45] and MCS (OR, 6.13; 95% CI, 2.23-16.83) and six of the eight subscales of the SF-36, adjusting for demographic and clinical characteristics. Conclusions: Type D personality was associated with more than a three- to six-fold increased risk of impaired HRQoL in heart transplant recipients, showing that the Type D personality construct also has value in heart transplant recipients. The adoption of a personality approach may lead to improved risk stratification in research and clinical practice in this patient group.

AB - Objective: Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) following transplantation is gaining importance as an endpoint, but little is known about the role of normal personality traits as a determinant of HRQoL in this patient group. We investigated whether Type D personality (tendency to experience increased negative emotions paired with the nonexpression of these emotions) was associated with impaired HRQoL in heart transplant recipients. Methods: Data were collected from all surviving heart transplant recipients ≥21 years of age (n=186) with a mean (S.D.) of 7 (5) years following transplantation. Patients completed the Short-Form Health Survey 36 (SF-36) and the Type D Scale (DS14). Clinical data were obtained from the medical records. Results: Of the 186 patients, 18% had a Type D personality. Type D patients had significantly worse scores on the Physical Component scale (PCS) (P=.04) and the Mental Component scale (MCS) (P<.001) of the SF-36 and all the SF-36 subdomains (all P<.01) compared with non-Type D patients, except for Bodily Pain. Type D personality remained an independent determinant of impaired PCS [odds ratio (OR), 3.62; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.25-10.45] and MCS (OR, 6.13; 95% CI, 2.23-16.83) and six of the eight subscales of the SF-36, adjusting for demographic and clinical characteristics. Conclusions: Type D personality was associated with more than a three- to six-fold increased risk of impaired HRQoL in heart transplant recipients, showing that the Type D personality construct also has value in heart transplant recipients. The adoption of a personality approach may lead to improved risk stratification in research and clinical practice in this patient group.

KW - Health-related quality of life

KW - Heart transplantation

KW - Type D personality

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U2 - 10.1016/j.jpsychores.2006.06.008

DO - 10.1016/j.jpsychores.2006.06.008

M3 - Journal article

VL - 61

SP - 791

EP - 795

JO - Journal of Psychosomatic Research

JF - Journal of Psychosomatic Research

SN - 0022-3999

IS - 6

ER -