Trace elements as paradigms of developmental neurotoxicants: Lead, methylmercury and arsenic

Philippe Grandjean, Katherine T Herz

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftKonferenceartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Trace elements have contributed unique insights into developmental neurotoxicity and serve as paradigms for such adverse effects. Many trace elements are retained in the body for long periods and can be easily measured to assess exposure by inexpensive analytical methods that became available several decades ago so that past and cumulated exposures could be easily characterized through analysis of biological samples, e.g. blood and urine. The first compelling evidence resulted from unfortunate poisoning events that allowed scrutiny of long-term outcomes of acute exposures that occurred during early development. Pursuant to this documentation, prospective studies of children's cohorts that applied sensitive neurobehavioral methods supported the notion that the brain is uniquely vulnerable to toxic damage during early development. Lead, methylmercury, and arsenic thereby serve as paradigm neurotoxicants that provide a reference for other substances that may have similar adverse effects. Less evidence is available on manganese, fluoride, and cadmium, but experience from the former trace elements suggest that, with time, adverse effects are likely to be documented at exposures previously thought to be low and safe.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftJournal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology
Vol/bind31
Udgave nummer1
Sider (fra-til)130-134
ISSN0946-672X
DOI
StatusUdgivet - jul. 2015
Begivenhed10th Nordic Symposium on Trace Elements in Human Health and Disease - Leon, Norge
Varighed: 25. aug. 201329. aug. 2013
Konferencens nummer: NTES

Konference

Konference10th Nordic Symposium on Trace Elements in Human Health and Disease
NummerNTES
LandNorge
ByLeon
Periode25/08/201329/08/2013

Fingeraftryk

Poisons
Manganese
Documentation
Poisoning
Urine
Prospective Studies
Lead
cadmium fluoride

Citer dette

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abstract = "Trace elements have contributed unique insights into developmental neurotoxicity and serve as paradigms for such adverse effects. Many trace elements are retained in the body for long periods and can be easily measured to assess exposure by inexpensive analytical methods that became available several decades ago so that past and cumulated exposures could be easily characterized through analysis of biological samples, e.g. blood and urine. The first compelling evidence resulted from unfortunate poisoning events that allowed scrutiny of long-term outcomes of acute exposures that occurred during early development. Pursuant to this documentation, prospective studies of children's cohorts that applied sensitive neurobehavioral methods supported the notion that the brain is uniquely vulnerable to toxic damage during early development. Lead, methylmercury, and arsenic thereby serve as paradigm neurotoxicants that provide a reference for other substances that may have similar adverse effects. Less evidence is available on manganese, fluoride, and cadmium, but experience from the former trace elements suggest that, with time, adverse effects are likely to be documented at exposures previously thought to be low and safe.",
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Trace elements as paradigms of developmental neurotoxicants : Lead, methylmercury and arsenic. / Grandjean, Philippe; Herz, Katherine T.

I: Journal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology, Bind 31, Nr. 1, 07.2015, s. 130-134.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftKonferenceartikelForskningpeer review

TY - GEN

T1 - Trace elements as paradigms of developmental neurotoxicants

T2 - Lead, methylmercury and arsenic

AU - Grandjean, Philippe

AU - Herz, Katherine T

N1 - Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

PY - 2015/7

Y1 - 2015/7

N2 - Trace elements have contributed unique insights into developmental neurotoxicity and serve as paradigms for such adverse effects. Many trace elements are retained in the body for long periods and can be easily measured to assess exposure by inexpensive analytical methods that became available several decades ago so that past and cumulated exposures could be easily characterized through analysis of biological samples, e.g. blood and urine. The first compelling evidence resulted from unfortunate poisoning events that allowed scrutiny of long-term outcomes of acute exposures that occurred during early development. Pursuant to this documentation, prospective studies of children's cohorts that applied sensitive neurobehavioral methods supported the notion that the brain is uniquely vulnerable to toxic damage during early development. Lead, methylmercury, and arsenic thereby serve as paradigm neurotoxicants that provide a reference for other substances that may have similar adverse effects. Less evidence is available on manganese, fluoride, and cadmium, but experience from the former trace elements suggest that, with time, adverse effects are likely to be documented at exposures previously thought to be low and safe.

AB - Trace elements have contributed unique insights into developmental neurotoxicity and serve as paradigms for such adverse effects. Many trace elements are retained in the body for long periods and can be easily measured to assess exposure by inexpensive analytical methods that became available several decades ago so that past and cumulated exposures could be easily characterized through analysis of biological samples, e.g. blood and urine. The first compelling evidence resulted from unfortunate poisoning events that allowed scrutiny of long-term outcomes of acute exposures that occurred during early development. Pursuant to this documentation, prospective studies of children's cohorts that applied sensitive neurobehavioral methods supported the notion that the brain is uniquely vulnerable to toxic damage during early development. Lead, methylmercury, and arsenic thereby serve as paradigm neurotoxicants that provide a reference for other substances that may have similar adverse effects. Less evidence is available on manganese, fluoride, and cadmium, but experience from the former trace elements suggest that, with time, adverse effects are likely to be documented at exposures previously thought to be low and safe.

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