Towards a quantitative understanding of the late Neoproterozoic carbon cycle

Christian Jannik Bjerrum, Donald Eugene Canfield

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

The cycles of carbon and oxygen at the Earth surface are intimately linked, where the burial of organic carbon into sediments represents a source of oxygen to the surface environment. This coupling is typically quantified through the isotope records of organic and inorganic carbon. Yet, the late Neoproterozoic Eon, the time when animals first evolved, experienced wild isotope fluctuations which do not conform to our normal understanding of the carbon cycle and carbon-oxygen coupling. We interpret these fluctuations with a new carbon cycle model and demonstrate that all of the main features of the carbonate and organic carbon isotope record can be explained by the release of methane hydrates from an anoxic dissolved organic carbon-rich ocean into an atmosphere containing oxygen levels considerably less than today.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Vol/bind108
Udgave nummer14
Sider (fra-til)5542–5547
ISSN0027-8424
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 1. apr. 2011

Fingeraftryk

carbon cycle
oxygen
organic carbon
isotope
carbon
inorganic carbon
dissolved organic carbon
carbon isotope
methane
carbonate
atmosphere
animal
ocean
sediment

Citer dette

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Towards a quantitative understanding of the late Neoproterozoic carbon cycle. / Bjerrum, Christian Jannik; Canfield, Donald Eugene.

I: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Bind 108, Nr. 14, 01.04.2011, s. 5542–5547.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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N2 - The cycles of carbon and oxygen at the Earth surface are intimately linked, where the burial of organic carbon into sediments represents a source of oxygen to the surface environment. This coupling is typically quantified through the isotope records of organic and inorganic carbon. Yet, the late Neoproterozoic Eon, the time when animals first evolved, experienced wild isotope fluctuations which do not conform to our normal understanding of the carbon cycle and carbon-oxygen coupling. We interpret these fluctuations with a new carbon cycle model and demonstrate that all of the main features of the carbonate and organic carbon isotope record can be explained by the release of methane hydrates from an anoxic dissolved organic carbon-rich ocean into an atmosphere containing oxygen levels considerably less than today.

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