Tomato contact dermatitis

Evy Paulsen, Lars P Christensen, Klaus Ejner Andersen

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

The tomato plant (Solanum lycopersicum) is an important crop worldwide. Whereas immediate-type reactions to tomato fruits are well known, contact dermatitis caused by tomatoes or tomato plants is rarely reported. The aims of this study were to present new data on contact sensitization to tomato plants and review the literature on contact dermatitis caused by both plants and fruits. An ether extract of tomato plants made as the original oleoresin plant extracts, was used in aimed patch testing, and between 2005 and 2011. 8 of 93 patients (9%) tested positive to the oleoresin extracts. This prevalence is in accordance with the older literature that reports tomato plants as occasional sensitizers. The same applies to tomato fruits, which, in addition, may cause protein contact dermatitis. The allergens of the plant are unknown, but both heat-stable and heat-labile constituents seem to be involved. The fruit contains fragrance compounds that are also present in Myroxylon pereirae (balsam of Peru), possibly accounting for cross-reactivity. The proteins in pulp and peel may contribute to protein contact dermatitis. Until more is known about the allergens, the diagnosis of contact dermatitis caused by tomato plants and fruit may be established with the use of ether extracts and fresh fruits, respectively.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftContact Dermatitis
Vol/bind67
Udgave nummer6
Sider (fra-til)321-327
Antal sider7
ISSN0105-1873
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2012

Fingeraftryk

Contact Dermatitis
Lycopersicon esculentum
Fruit
Ether
Allergens
Proteins

Citer dette

Paulsen, Evy ; Christensen, Lars P ; Andersen, Klaus Ejner. / Tomato contact dermatitis. I: Contact Dermatitis. 2012 ; Bind 67, Nr. 6. s. 321-327.
@article{a13ea10df3884002a34cf58a6a700446,
title = "Tomato contact dermatitis",
abstract = "The tomato plant (Solanum lycopersicum) is an important crop worldwide. Whereas immediate-type reactions to tomato fruits are well known, contact dermatitis caused by tomatoes or tomato plants is rarely reported. The aims of this study were to present new data on contact sensitization to tomato plants and review the literature on contact dermatitis caused by both plants and fruits. An ether extract of tomato plants made as the original oleoresin plant extracts, was used in aimed patch testing, and between 2005 and 2011. 8 of 93 patients (9{\%}) tested positive to the oleoresin extracts. This prevalence is in accordance with the older literature that reports tomato plants as occasional sensitizers. The same applies to tomato fruits, which, in addition, may cause protein contact dermatitis. The allergens of the plant are unknown, but both heat-stable and heat-labile constituents seem to be involved. The fruit contains fragrance compounds that are also present in Myroxylon pereirae (balsam of Peru), possibly accounting for cross-reactivity. The proteins in pulp and peel may contribute to protein contact dermatitis. Until more is known about the allergens, the diagnosis of contact dermatitis caused by tomato plants and fruit may be established with the use of ether extracts and fresh fruits, respectively.",
author = "Evy Paulsen and Christensen, {Lars P} and Andersen, {Klaus Ejner}",
note = "{\circledC} 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.",
year = "2012",
doi = "10.1111/j.1600-0536.2012.02138.x",
language = "English",
volume = "67",
pages = "321--327",
journal = "Contact Dermatitis",
issn = "0105-1873",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "6",

}

Tomato contact dermatitis. / Paulsen, Evy; Christensen, Lars P; Andersen, Klaus Ejner.

I: Contact Dermatitis, Bind 67, Nr. 6, 2012, s. 321-327.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Tomato contact dermatitis

AU - Paulsen, Evy

AU - Christensen, Lars P

AU - Andersen, Klaus Ejner

N1 - © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - The tomato plant (Solanum lycopersicum) is an important crop worldwide. Whereas immediate-type reactions to tomato fruits are well known, contact dermatitis caused by tomatoes or tomato plants is rarely reported. The aims of this study were to present new data on contact sensitization to tomato plants and review the literature on contact dermatitis caused by both plants and fruits. An ether extract of tomato plants made as the original oleoresin plant extracts, was used in aimed patch testing, and between 2005 and 2011. 8 of 93 patients (9%) tested positive to the oleoresin extracts. This prevalence is in accordance with the older literature that reports tomato plants as occasional sensitizers. The same applies to tomato fruits, which, in addition, may cause protein contact dermatitis. The allergens of the plant are unknown, but both heat-stable and heat-labile constituents seem to be involved. The fruit contains fragrance compounds that are also present in Myroxylon pereirae (balsam of Peru), possibly accounting for cross-reactivity. The proteins in pulp and peel may contribute to protein contact dermatitis. Until more is known about the allergens, the diagnosis of contact dermatitis caused by tomato plants and fruit may be established with the use of ether extracts and fresh fruits, respectively.

AB - The tomato plant (Solanum lycopersicum) is an important crop worldwide. Whereas immediate-type reactions to tomato fruits are well known, contact dermatitis caused by tomatoes or tomato plants is rarely reported. The aims of this study were to present new data on contact sensitization to tomato plants and review the literature on contact dermatitis caused by both plants and fruits. An ether extract of tomato plants made as the original oleoresin plant extracts, was used in aimed patch testing, and between 2005 and 2011. 8 of 93 patients (9%) tested positive to the oleoresin extracts. This prevalence is in accordance with the older literature that reports tomato plants as occasional sensitizers. The same applies to tomato fruits, which, in addition, may cause protein contact dermatitis. The allergens of the plant are unknown, but both heat-stable and heat-labile constituents seem to be involved. The fruit contains fragrance compounds that are also present in Myroxylon pereirae (balsam of Peru), possibly accounting for cross-reactivity. The proteins in pulp and peel may contribute to protein contact dermatitis. Until more is known about the allergens, the diagnosis of contact dermatitis caused by tomato plants and fruit may be established with the use of ether extracts and fresh fruits, respectively.

U2 - 10.1111/j.1600-0536.2012.02138.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1600-0536.2012.02138.x

M3 - Journal article

VL - 67

SP - 321

EP - 327

JO - Contact Dermatitis

JF - Contact Dermatitis

SN - 0105-1873

IS - 6

ER -