To females of a noctuid moth, male courtship songs are nothing more than bat echolocation calls

Ryo Nakano, Takuma Takanashi, Niels Skals, Annemarie Surlykke, Yukio Ishikawa

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskning

Resumé

It has been proposed that intraspecific ultrasonic communication observed in some moths evolved, through sexual selection, subsequent to the development of ears sensitive to echolocation calls of insectivorous bats. Given this scenario, the receiver bias model of signal evolution argues that acoustic communication in moths should have evolved through the exploitation of receivers' sensory bias towards bat ultrasound. We tested this model using a noctuid moth Spodoptera litura, males of which were recently found to produce courtship ultrasound. We first investigated the mechanism of sound production in the male moth, and subsequently the role of the sound with reference to the female's ability to discriminate male courtship songs from bat calls. We found that males have sex-specific tymbals for ultrasound emission, and that the broadcast of either male songs or simulated bat calls equally increased the acceptance of muted males by the female. It was concluded that females of this moth do not distinguish between male songs and bat calls, supporting the idea that acoustic communication in this moth evolved through a sensory exploitation process.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftBiology Letters
Vol/bind6
Udgave nummer5
Sider (fra-til)582-4
Antal sider3
ISSN1744-9561
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 23. okt. 2010

Fingeraftryk

Echolocation
Courtship
Music
Noctuidae
courtship
animal communication
Chiroptera
moths
Communication
Acoustics
acoustics
Spodoptera
Spodoptera litura
echolocation
Ultrasonics
sexual selection
ears
ultrasonics
gender

Citer dette

Nakano, Ryo ; Takanashi, Takuma ; Skals, Niels ; Surlykke, Annemarie ; Ishikawa, Yukio. / To females of a noctuid moth, male courtship songs are nothing more than bat echolocation calls. I: Biology Letters. 2010 ; Bind 6, Nr. 5. s. 582-4.
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title = "To females of a noctuid moth, male courtship songs are nothing more than bat echolocation calls",
abstract = "It has been proposed that intraspecific ultrasonic communication observed in some moths evolved, through sexual selection, subsequent to the development of ears sensitive to echolocation calls of insectivorous bats. Given this scenario, the receiver bias model of signal evolution argues that acoustic communication in moths should have evolved through the exploitation of receivers' sensory bias towards bat ultrasound. We tested this model using a noctuid moth Spodoptera litura, males of which were recently found to produce courtship ultrasound. We first investigated the mechanism of sound production in the male moth, and subsequently the role of the sound with reference to the female's ability to discriminate male courtship songs from bat calls. We found that males have sex-specific tymbals for ultrasound emission, and that the broadcast of either male songs or simulated bat calls equally increased the acceptance of muted males by the female. It was concluded that females of this moth do not distinguish between male songs and bat calls, supporting the idea that acoustic communication in this moth evolved through a sensory exploitation process.",
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To females of a noctuid moth, male courtship songs are nothing more than bat echolocation calls. / Nakano, Ryo; Takanashi, Takuma; Skals, Niels; Surlykke, Annemarie; Ishikawa, Yukio.

I: Biology Letters, Bind 6, Nr. 5, 23.10.2010, s. 582-4.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskning

TY - JOUR

T1 - To females of a noctuid moth, male courtship songs are nothing more than bat echolocation calls

AU - Nakano, Ryo

AU - Takanashi, Takuma

AU - Skals, Niels

AU - Surlykke, Annemarie

AU - Ishikawa, Yukio

PY - 2010/10/23

Y1 - 2010/10/23

N2 - It has been proposed that intraspecific ultrasonic communication observed in some moths evolved, through sexual selection, subsequent to the development of ears sensitive to echolocation calls of insectivorous bats. Given this scenario, the receiver bias model of signal evolution argues that acoustic communication in moths should have evolved through the exploitation of receivers' sensory bias towards bat ultrasound. We tested this model using a noctuid moth Spodoptera litura, males of which were recently found to produce courtship ultrasound. We first investigated the mechanism of sound production in the male moth, and subsequently the role of the sound with reference to the female's ability to discriminate male courtship songs from bat calls. We found that males have sex-specific tymbals for ultrasound emission, and that the broadcast of either male songs or simulated bat calls equally increased the acceptance of muted males by the female. It was concluded that females of this moth do not distinguish between male songs and bat calls, supporting the idea that acoustic communication in this moth evolved through a sensory exploitation process.

AB - It has been proposed that intraspecific ultrasonic communication observed in some moths evolved, through sexual selection, subsequent to the development of ears sensitive to echolocation calls of insectivorous bats. Given this scenario, the receiver bias model of signal evolution argues that acoustic communication in moths should have evolved through the exploitation of receivers' sensory bias towards bat ultrasound. We tested this model using a noctuid moth Spodoptera litura, males of which were recently found to produce courtship ultrasound. We first investigated the mechanism of sound production in the male moth, and subsequently the role of the sound with reference to the female's ability to discriminate male courtship songs from bat calls. We found that males have sex-specific tymbals for ultrasound emission, and that the broadcast of either male songs or simulated bat calls equally increased the acceptance of muted males by the female. It was concluded that females of this moth do not distinguish between male songs and bat calls, supporting the idea that acoustic communication in this moth evolved through a sensory exploitation process.

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SN - 1744-9561

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