Attachment Security and Pain: The Disrupting Effect of Captivity and PTSS

Bidragets oversatte titel: Tilknytning og Smerte - Den ødelæggende effekt af Fangeskab og Posttraumatisk Stress

Tonny Elmose Andersen, Yael Lahav, Ruth Defrin, Mario Mikulincer, Zahava Solomon

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

The present study assesses for the first time, the possible disruption effect of posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) with regard to the protective role of attachment on pain, among ex-POWs. While secure attachment seems to serve as a buffer, decreasing the perception of pain, this function may be disrupted by PTSS. The study sample included 104 subjects who were combat veterans of the 1973 Yom Kippur War comprising of 60 male ex-prisoners of war (ex-POWs) and 44 comparable male combat veterans. Both attachment and pain were investigated experimentally in the laboratory and via questionnaires. We found that ex-POWs showed higher levels of clinical pain and attachment insecurities compared to controls. Moreover, attachment avoidance and soothing effect of attachment (SEA) were both associated with lower levels of clinical pain. Most importantly, PTSS moderated the associations between attachment and pain, as well as the mediation role of attachment between captivity and pain. The results imply that although attachment can be an important resource for coping with pain, it can be severely disrupted by PTSS among trauma survivors.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftJournal of Psychosomatic Research
Vol/bind79
Udgave nummer6
Sider (fra-til)471-476
ISSN0022-3999
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2015

Citer dette

Andersen, Tonny Elmose ; Lahav, Yael ; Defrin, Ruth ; Mikulincer, Mario ; Solomon, Zahava. / Attachment Security and Pain : The Disrupting Effect of Captivity and PTSS. I: Journal of Psychosomatic Research. 2015 ; Bind 79, Nr. 6. s. 471-476.
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abstract = "The present study assesses for the first time, the possible disruption effect of posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) with regard to the protective role of attachment on pain, among ex-POWs. While secure attachment seems to serve as a buffer, decreasing the perception of pain, this function may be disrupted by PTSS. The study sample included 104 subjects who were combat veterans of the 1973 Yom Kippur War comprising of 60 male ex-prisoners of war (ex-POWs) and 44 comparable male combat veterans. Both attachment and pain were investigated experimentally in the laboratory and via questionnaires. We found that ex-POWs showed higher levels of clinical pain and attachment insecurities compared to controls. Moreover, attachment avoidance and soothing effect of attachment (SEA) were both associated with lower levels of clinical pain. Most importantly, PTSS moderated the associations between attachment and pain, as well as the mediation role of attachment between captivity and pain. The results imply that although attachment can be an important resource for coping with pain, it can be severely disrupted by PTSS among trauma survivors.",
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Attachment Security and Pain : The Disrupting Effect of Captivity and PTSS. / Andersen, Tonny Elmose; Lahav, Yael; Defrin, Ruth; Mikulincer, Mario; Solomon, Zahava.

I: Journal of Psychosomatic Research, Bind 79, Nr. 6, 2015, s. 471-476.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Attachment Security and Pain

T2 - The Disrupting Effect of Captivity and PTSS

AU - Andersen, Tonny Elmose

AU - Lahav, Yael

AU - Defrin, Ruth

AU - Mikulincer, Mario

AU - Solomon, Zahava

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - The present study assesses for the first time, the possible disruption effect of posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) with regard to the protective role of attachment on pain, among ex-POWs. While secure attachment seems to serve as a buffer, decreasing the perception of pain, this function may be disrupted by PTSS. The study sample included 104 subjects who were combat veterans of the 1973 Yom Kippur War comprising of 60 male ex-prisoners of war (ex-POWs) and 44 comparable male combat veterans. Both attachment and pain were investigated experimentally in the laboratory and via questionnaires. We found that ex-POWs showed higher levels of clinical pain and attachment insecurities compared to controls. Moreover, attachment avoidance and soothing effect of attachment (SEA) were both associated with lower levels of clinical pain. Most importantly, PTSS moderated the associations between attachment and pain, as well as the mediation role of attachment between captivity and pain. The results imply that although attachment can be an important resource for coping with pain, it can be severely disrupted by PTSS among trauma survivors.

AB - The present study assesses for the first time, the possible disruption effect of posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) with regard to the protective role of attachment on pain, among ex-POWs. While secure attachment seems to serve as a buffer, decreasing the perception of pain, this function may be disrupted by PTSS. The study sample included 104 subjects who were combat veterans of the 1973 Yom Kippur War comprising of 60 male ex-prisoners of war (ex-POWs) and 44 comparable male combat veterans. Both attachment and pain were investigated experimentally in the laboratory and via questionnaires. We found that ex-POWs showed higher levels of clinical pain and attachment insecurities compared to controls. Moreover, attachment avoidance and soothing effect of attachment (SEA) were both associated with lower levels of clinical pain. Most importantly, PTSS moderated the associations between attachment and pain, as well as the mediation role of attachment between captivity and pain. The results imply that although attachment can be an important resource for coping with pain, it can be severely disrupted by PTSS among trauma survivors.

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JO - Journal of Psychosomatic Research

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