Therapeutic Use of the Human Papillomavirus Vaccine on Recurrent Respiratory Papillomatosis

a systematic review and meta-analysis

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Resumé

BACKGROUND: Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis is a benign condition caused by human papillomavirus (HPV). Surgery is the mainstay of treatment, but numerous adjuvant therapies have been applied to improve surgical outcome. Recently, HPV vaccination has been introduced, but only smaller studies of its effect have been published. The present meta-analysis is intended as a possible substitute for a proposed but not yet realized multicenter randomized controlled trial. METHODS: A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis statement. PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane were systematically searched. All retrieved studies (n = 593) were reviewed and qualitatively assessed. In addition, 2 previously unpublished data sets were included. The systematic review included 11 studies, comprising 133 patients, of whom 63 patients from 5 studies were eligible for meta-analysis. A random-effects meta-analysis was conducted for the mean difference in number of surgical procedures per month before and after vaccination. RESULTS: The number of surgical procedures per month was significantly reduced after HPV vaccination compared with before vaccination (estimated mean, 0.06 vs 0.35). The mean intersurgical interval increased from 7.02 months (range, 0.30-45 months) before to 34.45 months (2.71-82 months) after HPV vaccination. CONCLUSION: The present study supports the continued use of the HPV vaccine as an adjuvant treatment for recurrent respiratory papillomatosis.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftThe Journal of Infectious Diseases
Vol/bind219
Udgave nummer7
Sider (fra-til)1016-1025
ISSN0022-1899
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 15. mar. 2019

Fingeraftryk

Therapeutic Uses
Meta-Analysis
PubMed
Randomized Controlled Trials
Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis

Citer dette

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title = "Therapeutic Use of the Human Papillomavirus Vaccine on Recurrent Respiratory Papillomatosis: a systematic review and meta-analysis",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis is a benign condition caused by human papillomavirus (HPV). Surgery is the mainstay of treatment, but numerous adjuvant therapies have been applied to improve surgical outcome. Recently, HPV vaccination has been introduced, but only smaller studies of its effect have been published. The present meta-analysis is intended as a possible substitute for a proposed but not yet realized multicenter randomized controlled trial. METHODS: A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis statement. PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane were systematically searched. All retrieved studies (n = 593) were reviewed and qualitatively assessed. In addition, 2 previously unpublished data sets were included. The systematic review included 11 studies, comprising 133 patients, of whom 63 patients from 5 studies were eligible for meta-analysis. A random-effects meta-analysis was conducted for the mean difference in number of surgical procedures per month before and after vaccination. RESULTS: The number of surgical procedures per month was significantly reduced after HPV vaccination compared with before vaccination (estimated mean, 0.06 vs 0.35). The mean intersurgical interval increased from 7.02 months (range, 0.30-45 months) before to 34.45 months (2.71-82 months) after HPV vaccination. CONCLUSION: The present study supports the continued use of the HPV vaccine as an adjuvant treatment for recurrent respiratory papillomatosis.",
keywords = "HPV vaccination, RRP, immunization, laryngeal papillomatosis, recurrent respiratory papillomatosis, therapeutic vaccination, Therapeutic vaccination, Immunization, Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis, Laryngeal papillomatosis",
author = "T Rosenberg and Philipsen, {Bahareh B} and Mehlum, {C S} and Dyrvig, {A K} and S Wehberg and M Chirila and C Godballe",
year = "2019",
month = "3",
day = "15",
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issn = "0022-1899",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Therapeutic Use of the Human Papillomavirus Vaccine on Recurrent Respiratory Papillomatosis

T2 - a systematic review and meta-analysis

AU - Rosenberg, T

AU - Philipsen, Bahareh B

AU - Mehlum, C S

AU - Dyrvig, A K

AU - Wehberg, S

AU - Chirila, M

AU - Godballe, C

PY - 2019/3/15

Y1 - 2019/3/15

N2 - BACKGROUND: Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis is a benign condition caused by human papillomavirus (HPV). Surgery is the mainstay of treatment, but numerous adjuvant therapies have been applied to improve surgical outcome. Recently, HPV vaccination has been introduced, but only smaller studies of its effect have been published. The present meta-analysis is intended as a possible substitute for a proposed but not yet realized multicenter randomized controlled trial. METHODS: A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis statement. PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane were systematically searched. All retrieved studies (n = 593) were reviewed and qualitatively assessed. In addition, 2 previously unpublished data sets were included. The systematic review included 11 studies, comprising 133 patients, of whom 63 patients from 5 studies were eligible for meta-analysis. A random-effects meta-analysis was conducted for the mean difference in number of surgical procedures per month before and after vaccination. RESULTS: The number of surgical procedures per month was significantly reduced after HPV vaccination compared with before vaccination (estimated mean, 0.06 vs 0.35). The mean intersurgical interval increased from 7.02 months (range, 0.30-45 months) before to 34.45 months (2.71-82 months) after HPV vaccination. CONCLUSION: The present study supports the continued use of the HPV vaccine as an adjuvant treatment for recurrent respiratory papillomatosis.

AB - BACKGROUND: Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis is a benign condition caused by human papillomavirus (HPV). Surgery is the mainstay of treatment, but numerous adjuvant therapies have been applied to improve surgical outcome. Recently, HPV vaccination has been introduced, but only smaller studies of its effect have been published. The present meta-analysis is intended as a possible substitute for a proposed but not yet realized multicenter randomized controlled trial. METHODS: A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis statement. PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane were systematically searched. All retrieved studies (n = 593) were reviewed and qualitatively assessed. In addition, 2 previously unpublished data sets were included. The systematic review included 11 studies, comprising 133 patients, of whom 63 patients from 5 studies were eligible for meta-analysis. A random-effects meta-analysis was conducted for the mean difference in number of surgical procedures per month before and after vaccination. RESULTS: The number of surgical procedures per month was significantly reduced after HPV vaccination compared with before vaccination (estimated mean, 0.06 vs 0.35). The mean intersurgical interval increased from 7.02 months (range, 0.30-45 months) before to 34.45 months (2.71-82 months) after HPV vaccination. CONCLUSION: The present study supports the continued use of the HPV vaccine as an adjuvant treatment for recurrent respiratory papillomatosis.

KW - HPV vaccination

KW - RRP

KW - immunization

KW - laryngeal papillomatosis

KW - recurrent respiratory papillomatosis

KW - therapeutic vaccination

KW - Therapeutic vaccination

KW - Immunization

KW - Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis

KW - Laryngeal papillomatosis

U2 - 10.1093/infdis/jiy616

DO - 10.1093/infdis/jiy616

M3 - Journal article

VL - 219

SP - 1016

EP - 1025

JO - Journal of Infectious Diseases

JF - Journal of Infectious Diseases

SN - 0022-1899

IS - 7

ER -