The social gradient in birthweight at term: quantification of the mediating role of maternal smoking and body mass index

Laust H Mortensen, Finn Diderichsen, George Davey Smith, Anne Marie Nybo Andersen

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Udgivelsesdato: 2009-okt
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftHuman Reproduction
Vol/bind24
Udgave nummer10
Sider (fra-til)2629-2635
Antal sider7
ISSN0268-1161
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 1. jan. 2009

Fingeraftryk

Body Mass Index
Smoking
Mothers
Education

Emneord

  • fødselsvægt
  • Rygning
  • BMI

Citer dette

Mortensen, Laust H ; Diderichsen, Finn ; Smith, George Davey ; Andersen, Anne Marie Nybo. / The social gradient in birthweight at term: quantification of the mediating role of maternal smoking and body mass index. I: Human Reproduction. 2009 ; Bind 24, Nr. 10. s. 2629-2635.
@article{e90494708e2111debe4e000ea68e967b,
title = "The social gradient in birthweight at term: quantification of the mediating role of maternal smoking and body mass index",
abstract = "BACKGROUND Maternal education is associated with the birthweight of offspring. We sought to quantify the role of maternal body mass index (BMI) and smoking as intermediary variables between maternal education and birthweight at term. METHODS We examined the association between maternal education, BMI, smoking and offspring's birthweight among women who delivered at term in the Danish National Birth Cohort (n = 75 085). RESULTS Compared with mothers with more than 12 years of education, women with 10-12 years of education had babies that were 12 (4-19) g lighter. Mothers with 9 years of education had babies that were 51 (95{\%} CI; 39-62) g lighter. BMI and smoking affected the association between maternal education and birthweight, albeit in different directions. If all mothers had the BMI of the highest educated mothers, the deficits would be larger: -20 (-22 to -19) and -74 (-80 to -68) g, respectively. If all mothers smoked like the highest educated mothers, mothers with a shorter education would have the heaviest babies: the difference would be 9 (2-16) and 23 (11-36) g, respectively. In combination, smoking and BMI all but explained the educational gradient in birthweight at term. CONCLUSION Maternal smoking and BMI are important intermediates of the educational gradient in birthweight at term. As the prevalence of smoking is dropping and the prevalence of obesity is increasing the educational gradient will likely reverse, but it seems unlikely that this will translate into a health advantage for the children of the least educated mothers.",
keywords = "f{\o}dselsv{\ae}gt, Rygning, BMI, Birth weight, Smoking, body mass index, socioeconomic factors, cohort study",
author = "Mortensen, {Laust H} and Finn Diderichsen and Smith, {George Davey} and Andersen, {Anne Marie Nybo}",
year = "2009",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1093/humrep/dep211",
language = "English",
volume = "24",
pages = "2629--2635",
journal = "Human Reproduction",
issn = "0268-1161",
publisher = "Heinemann",
number = "10",

}

The social gradient in birthweight at term: quantification of the mediating role of maternal smoking and body mass index. / Mortensen, Laust H; Diderichsen, Finn; Smith, George Davey; Andersen, Anne Marie Nybo.

I: Human Reproduction, Bind 24, Nr. 10, 01.01.2009, s. 2629-2635.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - The social gradient in birthweight at term: quantification of the mediating role of maternal smoking and body mass index

AU - Mortensen, Laust H

AU - Diderichsen, Finn

AU - Smith, George Davey

AU - Andersen, Anne Marie Nybo

PY - 2009/1/1

Y1 - 2009/1/1

N2 - BACKGROUND Maternal education is associated with the birthweight of offspring. We sought to quantify the role of maternal body mass index (BMI) and smoking as intermediary variables between maternal education and birthweight at term. METHODS We examined the association between maternal education, BMI, smoking and offspring's birthweight among women who delivered at term in the Danish National Birth Cohort (n = 75 085). RESULTS Compared with mothers with more than 12 years of education, women with 10-12 years of education had babies that were 12 (4-19) g lighter. Mothers with 9 years of education had babies that were 51 (95% CI; 39-62) g lighter. BMI and smoking affected the association between maternal education and birthweight, albeit in different directions. If all mothers had the BMI of the highest educated mothers, the deficits would be larger: -20 (-22 to -19) and -74 (-80 to -68) g, respectively. If all mothers smoked like the highest educated mothers, mothers with a shorter education would have the heaviest babies: the difference would be 9 (2-16) and 23 (11-36) g, respectively. In combination, smoking and BMI all but explained the educational gradient in birthweight at term. CONCLUSION Maternal smoking and BMI are important intermediates of the educational gradient in birthweight at term. As the prevalence of smoking is dropping and the prevalence of obesity is increasing the educational gradient will likely reverse, but it seems unlikely that this will translate into a health advantage for the children of the least educated mothers.

AB - BACKGROUND Maternal education is associated with the birthweight of offspring. We sought to quantify the role of maternal body mass index (BMI) and smoking as intermediary variables between maternal education and birthweight at term. METHODS We examined the association between maternal education, BMI, smoking and offspring's birthweight among women who delivered at term in the Danish National Birth Cohort (n = 75 085). RESULTS Compared with mothers with more than 12 years of education, women with 10-12 years of education had babies that were 12 (4-19) g lighter. Mothers with 9 years of education had babies that were 51 (95% CI; 39-62) g lighter. BMI and smoking affected the association between maternal education and birthweight, albeit in different directions. If all mothers had the BMI of the highest educated mothers, the deficits would be larger: -20 (-22 to -19) and -74 (-80 to -68) g, respectively. If all mothers smoked like the highest educated mothers, mothers with a shorter education would have the heaviest babies: the difference would be 9 (2-16) and 23 (11-36) g, respectively. In combination, smoking and BMI all but explained the educational gradient in birthweight at term. CONCLUSION Maternal smoking and BMI are important intermediates of the educational gradient in birthweight at term. As the prevalence of smoking is dropping and the prevalence of obesity is increasing the educational gradient will likely reverse, but it seems unlikely that this will translate into a health advantage for the children of the least educated mothers.

KW - fødselsvægt

KW - Rygning

KW - BMI

KW - Birth weight

KW - Smoking

KW - body mass index

KW - socioeconomic factors

KW - cohort study

U2 - 10.1093/humrep/dep211

DO - 10.1093/humrep/dep211

M3 - Journal article

VL - 24

SP - 2629

EP - 2635

JO - Human Reproduction

JF - Human Reproduction

SN - 0268-1161

IS - 10

ER -