The simple ears of noctuoid moths are tuned to the calls of their sympatric bat community

Hannah M Ter Hofstede, Holger R Goerlitz, John M Ratcliffe, Marc W Holderied, Annemarie Surlykke

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Insects with bat-detecting ears are ideal animals for investigating sensory system adaptations to predator cues. Noctuid moths have two auditory receptors (A1 and A2) sensitive to the ultrasonic echolocation calls of insectivorous bats. Larger moths are detected at greater distances by bats than smaller moths. Larger moths also have lower A1 best thresholds, allowing them to detect bats at greater distances and possibly compensating for their increased conspicuousness. Interestingly, the sound frequency at the lowest threshold is lower in larger than smaller moths, suggesting that the relationship between threshold and size might vary across frequencies used by different bat species. Here, we demonstrate that the relationships between threshold and size in moths were only significant at some frequencies, and these frequencies differed between three locations (UK, Canada, Denmark). The relationships were more likely to be significant at call frequencies used by proportionately more bat species in the moths' specific bat community, suggesting an association between the tuning of moth ears and the cues provided by sympatric predators. Additionally, we found that the best threshold and best frequency of the less sensitive A2 receptor are also related to size, and that these relationships hold when controlling for evolutionary relationships. The slopes of best threshold vs. size differ, however, such that the difference in threshold between A1 and A2 is greater for larger than smaller moths. The shorter time from A1 to A2 excitation in smaller than larger moths could potentially compensate for shorter absolute detection distances in smaller moths.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
Artikelnummer216
TidsskriftJournal of Experimental Biology
Vol/bind216
Sider (fra-til)3954-3962
ISSN0022-0949
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2013

Fingeraftryk

bat
moth
Chiroptera
moths
ears
varespladib methyl
Cues
Echolocation
predators
predator
receptors
sensory system
echolocation
Noctuidae
Denmark
Ultrasonics
ultrasonics
Canada
insect
insects

Citer dette

Ter Hofstede, H. M., Goerlitz, H. R., Ratcliffe, J. M., Holderied, M. W., & Surlykke, A. (2013). The simple ears of noctuoid moths are tuned to the calls of their sympatric bat community. Journal of Experimental Biology, 216, 3954-3962. [216]. https://doi.org/10.1242/jeb.093294
Ter Hofstede, Hannah M ; Goerlitz, Holger R ; Ratcliffe, John M ; Holderied, Marc W ; Surlykke, Annemarie. / The simple ears of noctuoid moths are tuned to the calls of their sympatric bat community. I: Journal of Experimental Biology. 2013 ; Bind 216. s. 3954-3962.
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abstract = "Insects with bat-detecting ears are ideal animals for investigating sensory system adaptations to predator cues. Noctuid moths have two auditory receptors (A1 and A2) sensitive to the ultrasonic echolocation calls of insectivorous bats. Larger moths are detected at greater distances by bats than smaller moths. Larger moths also have lower A1 best thresholds, allowing them to detect bats at greater distances and possibly compensating for their increased conspicuousness. Interestingly, the sound frequency at the lowest threshold is lower in larger than smaller moths, suggesting that the relationship between threshold and size might vary across frequencies used by different bat species. Here, we demonstrate that the relationships between threshold and size in moths were only significant at some frequencies, and these frequencies differed between three locations (UK, Canada, Denmark). The relationships were more likely to be significant at call frequencies used by proportionately more bat species in the moths' specific bat community, suggesting an association between the tuning of moth ears and the cues provided by sympatric predators. Additionally, we found that the best threshold and best frequency of the less sensitive A2 receptor are also related to size, and that these relationships hold when controlling for evolutionary relationships. The slopes of best threshold vs. size differ, however, such that the difference in threshold between A1 and A2 is greater for larger than smaller moths. The shorter time from A1 to A2 excitation in smaller than larger moths could potentially compensate for shorter absolute detection distances in smaller moths.",
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Ter Hofstede, HM, Goerlitz, HR, Ratcliffe, JM, Holderied, MW & Surlykke, A 2013, 'The simple ears of noctuoid moths are tuned to the calls of their sympatric bat community', Journal of Experimental Biology, bind 216, 216, s. 3954-3962. https://doi.org/10.1242/jeb.093294

The simple ears of noctuoid moths are tuned to the calls of their sympatric bat community. / Ter Hofstede, Hannah M; Goerlitz, Holger R; Ratcliffe, John M; Holderied, Marc W; Surlykke, Annemarie.

I: Journal of Experimental Biology, Bind 216, 216, 2013, s. 3954-3962.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - The simple ears of noctuoid moths are tuned to the calls of their sympatric bat community

AU - Ter Hofstede, Hannah M

AU - Goerlitz, Holger R

AU - Ratcliffe, John M

AU - Holderied, Marc W

AU - Surlykke, Annemarie

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - Insects with bat-detecting ears are ideal animals for investigating sensory system adaptations to predator cues. Noctuid moths have two auditory receptors (A1 and A2) sensitive to the ultrasonic echolocation calls of insectivorous bats. Larger moths are detected at greater distances by bats than smaller moths. Larger moths also have lower A1 best thresholds, allowing them to detect bats at greater distances and possibly compensating for their increased conspicuousness. Interestingly, the sound frequency at the lowest threshold is lower in larger than smaller moths, suggesting that the relationship between threshold and size might vary across frequencies used by different bat species. Here, we demonstrate that the relationships between threshold and size in moths were only significant at some frequencies, and these frequencies differed between three locations (UK, Canada, Denmark). The relationships were more likely to be significant at call frequencies used by proportionately more bat species in the moths' specific bat community, suggesting an association between the tuning of moth ears and the cues provided by sympatric predators. Additionally, we found that the best threshold and best frequency of the less sensitive A2 receptor are also related to size, and that these relationships hold when controlling for evolutionary relationships. The slopes of best threshold vs. size differ, however, such that the difference in threshold between A1 and A2 is greater for larger than smaller moths. The shorter time from A1 to A2 excitation in smaller than larger moths could potentially compensate for shorter absolute detection distances in smaller moths.

AB - Insects with bat-detecting ears are ideal animals for investigating sensory system adaptations to predator cues. Noctuid moths have two auditory receptors (A1 and A2) sensitive to the ultrasonic echolocation calls of insectivorous bats. Larger moths are detected at greater distances by bats than smaller moths. Larger moths also have lower A1 best thresholds, allowing them to detect bats at greater distances and possibly compensating for their increased conspicuousness. Interestingly, the sound frequency at the lowest threshold is lower in larger than smaller moths, suggesting that the relationship between threshold and size might vary across frequencies used by different bat species. Here, we demonstrate that the relationships between threshold and size in moths were only significant at some frequencies, and these frequencies differed between three locations (UK, Canada, Denmark). The relationships were more likely to be significant at call frequencies used by proportionately more bat species in the moths' specific bat community, suggesting an association between the tuning of moth ears and the cues provided by sympatric predators. Additionally, we found that the best threshold and best frequency of the less sensitive A2 receptor are also related to size, and that these relationships hold when controlling for evolutionary relationships. The slopes of best threshold vs. size differ, however, such that the difference in threshold between A1 and A2 is greater for larger than smaller moths. The shorter time from A1 to A2 excitation in smaller than larger moths could potentially compensate for shorter absolute detection distances in smaller moths.

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