The Relationship Between Immigrant School Composition, Classmate Support and Involvement in Physical Fighting and Bullying among Adolescent Immigrants and Non-immigrants in 11 Countries

Sophie D Walsh, Bart De Clercq, Michal Molcho, Yossi Harel-Fisch, Colleen M Davison, Katrine Rich Madsen, Gonneke W J M Stevens

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

    Resumé

    Increasing numbers of migrant youth around the world mean growing numbers of heterogeneous school environments in many countries. Contradictory findings regarding the relationship between immigrant school composition (the percentage of immigrant versus non-immigrant students in a school) and adolescent peer violence necessitate further consideration. The current study examined the relationship between immigrant school composition and peer violence, considering classmate support as a potential moderator among 51,636 adolescents (50.1 % female) from 11 countries. The findings showed that a higher percentage of immigrant adolescents in a school was related to higher levels of physical fighting and bullying perpetration for both immigrant and non-immigrant adolescents and lower levels of victimization for immigrants. In environments of low classmate support, the positive relationship between immigrant school composition and fighting was stronger for non-immigrants than in environments with high classmate support. In environments of low classmate support, the negative relationship between immigrant school composition and fighting and bullying victimization was stronger for immigrant adolescents than in environments with high classmate support. In general, the contribution of immigrant school composition was modest in comparison to the contribution of classmate support. The findings emphasize that it is not just the number of immigrants in a class per se, but rather the environment in the classroom which influences levels of peer violence. The results highlight a need for school intervention programs encouraging positive relations in schools with immigrant populations.

    OriginalsprogEngelsk
    TidsskriftJournal of Youth and Adolescence
    Vol/bind45
    Udgave nummer1
    Sider (fra-til)1–16
    ISSN0047-2891
    DOI
    StatusUdgivet - 2016

    Fingeraftryk

    exclusion
    immigrant
    adolescent
    school
    Crime Victims
    violence
    victimization
    female adolescent
    moderator
    migrant
    classroom

    Citer dette

    Walsh, Sophie D ; De Clercq, Bart ; Molcho, Michal ; Harel-Fisch, Yossi ; Davison, Colleen M ; Rich Madsen, Katrine ; Stevens, Gonneke W J M. / The Relationship Between Immigrant School Composition, Classmate Support and Involvement in Physical Fighting and Bullying among Adolescent Immigrants and Non-immigrants in 11 Countries. I: Journal of Youth and Adolescence. 2016 ; Bind 45, Nr. 1. s. 1–16.
    @article{f71b7893b10447e4a49d66d216b70b19,
    title = "The Relationship Between Immigrant School Composition, Classmate Support and Involvement in Physical Fighting and Bullying among Adolescent Immigrants and Non-immigrants in 11 Countries",
    abstract = "Increasing numbers of migrant youth around the world mean growing numbers of heterogeneous school environments in many countries. Contradictory findings regarding the relationship between immigrant school composition (the percentage of immigrant versus non-immigrant students in a school) and adolescent peer violence necessitate further consideration. The current study examined the relationship between immigrant school composition and peer violence, considering classmate support as a potential moderator among 51,636 adolescents (50.1 {\%} female) from 11 countries. The findings showed that a higher percentage of immigrant adolescents in a school was related to higher levels of physical fighting and bullying perpetration for both immigrant and non-immigrant adolescents and lower levels of victimization for immigrants. In environments of low classmate support, the positive relationship between immigrant school composition and fighting was stronger for non-immigrants than in environments with high classmate support. In environments of low classmate support, the negative relationship between immigrant school composition and fighting and bullying victimization was stronger for immigrant adolescents than in environments with high classmate support. In general, the contribution of immigrant school composition was modest in comparison to the contribution of classmate support. The findings emphasize that it is not just the number of immigrants in a class per se, but rather the environment in the classroom which influences levels of peer violence. The results highlight a need for school intervention programs encouraging positive relations in schools with immigrant populations.",
    author = "Walsh, {Sophie D} and {De Clercq}, Bart and Michal Molcho and Yossi Harel-Fisch and Davison, {Colleen M} and {Rich Madsen}, Katrine and Stevens, {Gonneke W J M}",
    year = "2016",
    doi = "10.1007/s10964-015-0367-0",
    language = "English",
    volume = "45",
    pages = "1–16",
    journal = "Journal of Youth and Adolescence",
    issn = "0047-2891",
    publisher = "Springer",
    number = "1",

    }

    The Relationship Between Immigrant School Composition, Classmate Support and Involvement in Physical Fighting and Bullying among Adolescent Immigrants and Non-immigrants in 11 Countries. / Walsh, Sophie D; De Clercq, Bart; Molcho, Michal; Harel-Fisch, Yossi; Davison, Colleen M; Rich Madsen, Katrine; Stevens, Gonneke W J M.

    I: Journal of Youth and Adolescence, Bind 45, Nr. 1, 2016, s. 1–16.

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - The Relationship Between Immigrant School Composition, Classmate Support and Involvement in Physical Fighting and Bullying among Adolescent Immigrants and Non-immigrants in 11 Countries

    AU - Walsh, Sophie D

    AU - De Clercq, Bart

    AU - Molcho, Michal

    AU - Harel-Fisch, Yossi

    AU - Davison, Colleen M

    AU - Rich Madsen, Katrine

    AU - Stevens, Gonneke W J M

    PY - 2016

    Y1 - 2016

    N2 - Increasing numbers of migrant youth around the world mean growing numbers of heterogeneous school environments in many countries. Contradictory findings regarding the relationship between immigrant school composition (the percentage of immigrant versus non-immigrant students in a school) and adolescent peer violence necessitate further consideration. The current study examined the relationship between immigrant school composition and peer violence, considering classmate support as a potential moderator among 51,636 adolescents (50.1 % female) from 11 countries. The findings showed that a higher percentage of immigrant adolescents in a school was related to higher levels of physical fighting and bullying perpetration for both immigrant and non-immigrant adolescents and lower levels of victimization for immigrants. In environments of low classmate support, the positive relationship between immigrant school composition and fighting was stronger for non-immigrants than in environments with high classmate support. In environments of low classmate support, the negative relationship between immigrant school composition and fighting and bullying victimization was stronger for immigrant adolescents than in environments with high classmate support. In general, the contribution of immigrant school composition was modest in comparison to the contribution of classmate support. The findings emphasize that it is not just the number of immigrants in a class per se, but rather the environment in the classroom which influences levels of peer violence. The results highlight a need for school intervention programs encouraging positive relations in schools with immigrant populations.

    AB - Increasing numbers of migrant youth around the world mean growing numbers of heterogeneous school environments in many countries. Contradictory findings regarding the relationship between immigrant school composition (the percentage of immigrant versus non-immigrant students in a school) and adolescent peer violence necessitate further consideration. The current study examined the relationship between immigrant school composition and peer violence, considering classmate support as a potential moderator among 51,636 adolescents (50.1 % female) from 11 countries. The findings showed that a higher percentage of immigrant adolescents in a school was related to higher levels of physical fighting and bullying perpetration for both immigrant and non-immigrant adolescents and lower levels of victimization for immigrants. In environments of low classmate support, the positive relationship between immigrant school composition and fighting was stronger for non-immigrants than in environments with high classmate support. In environments of low classmate support, the negative relationship between immigrant school composition and fighting and bullying victimization was stronger for immigrant adolescents than in environments with high classmate support. In general, the contribution of immigrant school composition was modest in comparison to the contribution of classmate support. The findings emphasize that it is not just the number of immigrants in a class per se, but rather the environment in the classroom which influences levels of peer violence. The results highlight a need for school intervention programs encouraging positive relations in schools with immigrant populations.

    U2 - 10.1007/s10964-015-0367-0

    DO - 10.1007/s10964-015-0367-0

    M3 - Journal article

    VL - 45

    SP - 1

    EP - 16

    JO - Journal of Youth and Adolescence

    JF - Journal of Youth and Adolescence

    SN - 0047-2891

    IS - 1

    ER -