The Pro-Elderly Bias of Social Policies in Israel: A Historical-Institutional Account

Haya Gamliel-Yehoshua, Pieter Vanhuysse

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Accelerated population aging and high voting turnout rates among elderly voters in recent decades have led many social scientists to predict increasing pro-elderly biases in the social policies of mature welfare states. This article investigates and empirically estimates the evolving age orientation of social policies in Israel, which is a comparatively young society that has nevertheless aged significantly since independence in 1948. We present a historical overview of the development of policy efforts towards different age groups and estimate an Elderly/Non-Elderly Spending Ratio at four points in time between 1975 and 2005. We argue that in its first five decades, the Israeli welfare state uniquely combined a broadly universalistic and citizenship-based outlook with a number of significant particularistic spending biases towards specific subgroups. But from the second half of the 1990s onwards, the pro-elderly policy bias of the Israeli welfare state has strongly increased. These findings support Lynch's thesis for 21 OECD countries, which posits that a shift from a universal to a more particularistic institutional model of welfare will result in a higher pro-elderly bias of social spending.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftSocial Policy and Administration
Vol/bind44
Udgave nummer6
Sider (fra-til)708-726
ISSN0144-5596
StatusUdgivet - 2010

Fingeraftryk

social policy
Israel
aging population
trend
citizenship
OECD
welfare state
Israeli
social scientist
voting
policy
Social Policy
age group
welfare
thesis
young
society
rate

Citer dette

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abstract = "Accelerated population aging and high voting turnout rates among elderly voters in recent decades have led many social scientists to predict increasing pro-elderly biases in the social policies of mature welfare states. This article investigates and empirically estimates the evolving age orientation of social policies in Israel, which is a comparatively young society that has nevertheless aged significantly since independence in 1948. We present a historical overview of the development of policy efforts towards different age groups and estimate an Elderly/Non-Elderly Spending Ratio at four points in time between 1975 and 2005. We argue that in its first five decades, the Israeli welfare state uniquely combined a broadly universalistic and citizenship-based outlook with a number of significant particularistic spending biases towards specific subgroups. But from the second half of the 1990s onwards, the pro-elderly policy bias of the Israeli welfare state has strongly increased. These findings support Lynch's thesis for 21 OECD countries, which posits that a shift from a universal to a more particularistic institutional model of welfare will result in a higher pro-elderly bias of social spending.",
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The Pro-Elderly Bias of Social Policies in Israel : A Historical-Institutional Account. / Gamliel-Yehoshua, Haya; Vanhuysse, Pieter.

I: Social Policy and Administration, Bind 44, Nr. 6, 2010, s. 708-726.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

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T2 - A Historical-Institutional Account

AU - Gamliel-Yehoshua, Haya

AU - Vanhuysse, Pieter

PY - 2010

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N2 - Accelerated population aging and high voting turnout rates among elderly voters in recent decades have led many social scientists to predict increasing pro-elderly biases in the social policies of mature welfare states. This article investigates and empirically estimates the evolving age orientation of social policies in Israel, which is a comparatively young society that has nevertheless aged significantly since independence in 1948. We present a historical overview of the development of policy efforts towards different age groups and estimate an Elderly/Non-Elderly Spending Ratio at four points in time between 1975 and 2005. We argue that in its first five decades, the Israeli welfare state uniquely combined a broadly universalistic and citizenship-based outlook with a number of significant particularistic spending biases towards specific subgroups. But from the second half of the 1990s onwards, the pro-elderly policy bias of the Israeli welfare state has strongly increased. These findings support Lynch's thesis for 21 OECD countries, which posits that a shift from a universal to a more particularistic institutional model of welfare will result in a higher pro-elderly bias of social spending.

AB - Accelerated population aging and high voting turnout rates among elderly voters in recent decades have led many social scientists to predict increasing pro-elderly biases in the social policies of mature welfare states. This article investigates and empirically estimates the evolving age orientation of social policies in Israel, which is a comparatively young society that has nevertheless aged significantly since independence in 1948. We present a historical overview of the development of policy efforts towards different age groups and estimate an Elderly/Non-Elderly Spending Ratio at four points in time between 1975 and 2005. We argue that in its first five decades, the Israeli welfare state uniquely combined a broadly universalistic and citizenship-based outlook with a number of significant particularistic spending biases towards specific subgroups. But from the second half of the 1990s onwards, the pro-elderly policy bias of the Israeli welfare state has strongly increased. These findings support Lynch's thesis for 21 OECD countries, which posits that a shift from a universal to a more particularistic institutional model of welfare will result in a higher pro-elderly bias of social spending.

KW - Generational Conflict, Population Aging, Age-Bias, Child Allowances, Pensions, Israeli Welfare Regime

UR - http://ssrn.com/abstract=1650011

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JO - Social Policy and Administration

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SN - 0144-5596

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