The meaning of work and working life after cancer: an interview study

Dorte M Rasmussen, Beth Elverdam

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Udgivelsesdato: 2008-Dec
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftPsycho-Oncology
Vol/bind17
Udgave nummer12
Sider (fra-til)1232-1238
Antal sider6
ISSN1057-9249
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 1. dec. 2008

Fingeraftryk

Interviews
Survivors
Neoplasms
Return to Work
Rehabilitation Centers
Observation

Citer dette

Rasmussen, Dorte M ; Elverdam, Beth. / The meaning of work and working life after cancer: an interview study. I: Psycho-Oncology. 2008 ; Bind 17, Nr. 12. s. 1232-1238.
@article{48271730cc3411dd9908000ea68e967b,
title = "The meaning of work and working life after cancer: an interview study",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Cancer survivors have diverse and complex patterns of return to work, but little attention has been given to individual experiences of returning to work. OBJECTIVES: To analyse the meaning of work and working life for cancer survivors over time. METHODS: Participant observation was carried out at a cancer rehabilitation centre. A total of 23 participants were interviewed twice. RESULTS: Cancer survivors try to get back to work after treatment and try to re-establish their former structure of everyday-life that is seen as a normal and healthy existence. Work contributes to creating the individual as a social being, partaking in social relations with others. Work plays a role in establishing the individual's identity. It is difficult for many to resume work. When they are unable to work, they establish new activities in everyday-life that give meaning to a life. In order to understand the cultural meaning of work in capitalist society, we incorporate the theoretical perspective of Max Weber. CONCLUSION: Those who after cancer treatment are unable to work lose a part of their identity; they lose the personal challenge and satisfaction related to work. They are no longer part of the companionship related to work. Having had cancer means a disruption of the structure of everyday-life that is taken for granted.",
author = "Rasmussen, {Dorte M} and Beth Elverdam",
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language = "English",
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The meaning of work and working life after cancer: an interview study. / Rasmussen, Dorte M; Elverdam, Beth.

I: Psycho-Oncology, Bind 17, Nr. 12, 01.12.2008, s. 1232-1238.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - The meaning of work and working life after cancer: an interview study

AU - Rasmussen, Dorte M

AU - Elverdam, Beth

N1 - (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

PY - 2008/12/1

Y1 - 2008/12/1

N2 - BACKGROUND: Cancer survivors have diverse and complex patterns of return to work, but little attention has been given to individual experiences of returning to work. OBJECTIVES: To analyse the meaning of work and working life for cancer survivors over time. METHODS: Participant observation was carried out at a cancer rehabilitation centre. A total of 23 participants were interviewed twice. RESULTS: Cancer survivors try to get back to work after treatment and try to re-establish their former structure of everyday-life that is seen as a normal and healthy existence. Work contributes to creating the individual as a social being, partaking in social relations with others. Work plays a role in establishing the individual's identity. It is difficult for many to resume work. When they are unable to work, they establish new activities in everyday-life that give meaning to a life. In order to understand the cultural meaning of work in capitalist society, we incorporate the theoretical perspective of Max Weber. CONCLUSION: Those who after cancer treatment are unable to work lose a part of their identity; they lose the personal challenge and satisfaction related to work. They are no longer part of the companionship related to work. Having had cancer means a disruption of the structure of everyday-life that is taken for granted.

AB - BACKGROUND: Cancer survivors have diverse and complex patterns of return to work, but little attention has been given to individual experiences of returning to work. OBJECTIVES: To analyse the meaning of work and working life for cancer survivors over time. METHODS: Participant observation was carried out at a cancer rehabilitation centre. A total of 23 participants were interviewed twice. RESULTS: Cancer survivors try to get back to work after treatment and try to re-establish their former structure of everyday-life that is seen as a normal and healthy existence. Work contributes to creating the individual as a social being, partaking in social relations with others. Work plays a role in establishing the individual's identity. It is difficult for many to resume work. When they are unable to work, they establish new activities in everyday-life that give meaning to a life. In order to understand the cultural meaning of work in capitalist society, we incorporate the theoretical perspective of Max Weber. CONCLUSION: Those who after cancer treatment are unable to work lose a part of their identity; they lose the personal challenge and satisfaction related to work. They are no longer part of the companionship related to work. Having had cancer means a disruption of the structure of everyday-life that is taken for granted.

U2 - 10.1002/pon.1354

DO - 10.1002/pon.1354

M3 - Journal article

VL - 17

SP - 1232

EP - 1238

JO - Psycho-Oncology

JF - Psycho-Oncology

SN - 1057-9249

IS - 12

ER -