The marker of cobalamin deficiency, plasma methylmalonic acid, correlates to plasma creatinine

A M Hvas, S Juul, Lars Ulrik Gerdes, E Nexø

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

    Resumé

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the relationship between the two diagnostic tests, plasma methylmalonic acid and plasma cobalamins, and their association with plasma creatinine, age and sex.

    DESIGN: Cross-sectional study of simultaneous laboratory measurements.

    SETTING: County of Aarhus, Denmark.

    SUBJECTS: Records on 1689 patients who had their first plasma methylmalonic acid measurement during 1995 and 1996, and who had a simultaneous measurement of plasma cobalamins. Plasma creatinine values measured within a week of measurements of plasma methylmalonic acid and plasma cobalamins were available for 1255 of the patients.

    MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Predictors of variation in plasma methylmalonic acid; plasma cobalamins, plasma creatinine, age and sex.

    RESULTS: Plasma methylmalonic acid was positively correlated with plasma creatinine, even for plasma creatinine within the normal range. These associations remained in a multiple regression analysis. For plasma cobalamins below 200 pmol L-1, there was a strong negative correlation between plasma methylmalonic acid and plasma cobalamins, whilst the association was weak for higher plasma cobalamin levels. Plasma methylmalonic acid increased and plasma cobalamins decreased with age.

    CONCLUSIONS: The strong correlation between plasma methylmalonic acid and plasma creatinine suggests that plasma creatinine - also within the normal range - must be taken into consideration when interpreting plasma methylmalonic acid.

    OriginalsprogEngelsk
    TidsskriftJournal of Internal Medicine. Supplement
    Vol/bind247
    Udgave nummer4
    Sider (fra-til)507-12
    Antal sider6
    ISSN0954-6820
    StatusUdgivet - apr. 2000

    Fingeraftryk

    Methylmalonic Acid
    Creatinine

    Citer dette

    Hvas, A M ; Juul, S ; Gerdes, Lars Ulrik ; Nexø, E. / The marker of cobalamin deficiency, plasma methylmalonic acid, correlates to plasma creatinine. I: Journal of Internal Medicine. Supplement. 2000 ; Bind 247, Nr. 4. s. 507-12.
    @article{23f77a5833ae4c27b17ed32d65235f34,
    title = "The marker of cobalamin deficiency, plasma methylmalonic acid, correlates to plasma creatinine",
    abstract = "OBJECTIVE: To examine the relationship between the two diagnostic tests, plasma methylmalonic acid and plasma cobalamins, and their association with plasma creatinine, age and sex.DESIGN: Cross-sectional study of simultaneous laboratory measurements.SETTING: County of Aarhus, Denmark.SUBJECTS: Records on 1689 patients who had their first plasma methylmalonic acid measurement during 1995 and 1996, and who had a simultaneous measurement of plasma cobalamins. Plasma creatinine values measured within a week of measurements of plasma methylmalonic acid and plasma cobalamins were available for 1255 of the patients.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Predictors of variation in plasma methylmalonic acid; plasma cobalamins, plasma creatinine, age and sex.RESULTS: Plasma methylmalonic acid was positively correlated with plasma creatinine, even for plasma creatinine within the normal range. These associations remained in a multiple regression analysis. For plasma cobalamins below 200 pmol L-1, there was a strong negative correlation between plasma methylmalonic acid and plasma cobalamins, whilst the association was weak for higher plasma cobalamin levels. Plasma methylmalonic acid increased and plasma cobalamins decreased with age.CONCLUSIONS: The strong correlation between plasma methylmalonic acid and plasma creatinine suggests that plasma creatinine - also within the normal range - must be taken into consideration when interpreting plasma methylmalonic acid.",
    keywords = "Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Biological Markers, Child, Child, Preschool, Creatinine, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, Humans, Male, Methylmalonic Acid, Middle Aged, Reference Values, Sex Factors, Vitamin B 12 Deficiency",
    author = "Hvas, {A M} and S Juul and Gerdes, {Lars Ulrik} and E Nex{\o}",
    year = "2000",
    month = "4",
    language = "English",
    volume = "247",
    pages = "507--12",
    journal = "Journal of Internal Medicine. Supplement",
    issn = "0955-7873",
    publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
    number = "4",

    }

    The marker of cobalamin deficiency, plasma methylmalonic acid, correlates to plasma creatinine. / Hvas, A M; Juul, S; Gerdes, Lars Ulrik; Nexø, E.

    I: Journal of Internal Medicine. Supplement, Bind 247, Nr. 4, 04.2000, s. 507-12.

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - The marker of cobalamin deficiency, plasma methylmalonic acid, correlates to plasma creatinine

    AU - Hvas, A M

    AU - Juul, S

    AU - Gerdes, Lars Ulrik

    AU - Nexø, E

    PY - 2000/4

    Y1 - 2000/4

    N2 - OBJECTIVE: To examine the relationship between the two diagnostic tests, plasma methylmalonic acid and plasma cobalamins, and their association with plasma creatinine, age and sex.DESIGN: Cross-sectional study of simultaneous laboratory measurements.SETTING: County of Aarhus, Denmark.SUBJECTS: Records on 1689 patients who had their first plasma methylmalonic acid measurement during 1995 and 1996, and who had a simultaneous measurement of plasma cobalamins. Plasma creatinine values measured within a week of measurements of plasma methylmalonic acid and plasma cobalamins were available for 1255 of the patients.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Predictors of variation in plasma methylmalonic acid; plasma cobalamins, plasma creatinine, age and sex.RESULTS: Plasma methylmalonic acid was positively correlated with plasma creatinine, even for plasma creatinine within the normal range. These associations remained in a multiple regression analysis. For plasma cobalamins below 200 pmol L-1, there was a strong negative correlation between plasma methylmalonic acid and plasma cobalamins, whilst the association was weak for higher plasma cobalamin levels. Plasma methylmalonic acid increased and plasma cobalamins decreased with age.CONCLUSIONS: The strong correlation between plasma methylmalonic acid and plasma creatinine suggests that plasma creatinine - also within the normal range - must be taken into consideration when interpreting plasma methylmalonic acid.

    AB - OBJECTIVE: To examine the relationship between the two diagnostic tests, plasma methylmalonic acid and plasma cobalamins, and their association with plasma creatinine, age and sex.DESIGN: Cross-sectional study of simultaneous laboratory measurements.SETTING: County of Aarhus, Denmark.SUBJECTS: Records on 1689 patients who had their first plasma methylmalonic acid measurement during 1995 and 1996, and who had a simultaneous measurement of plasma cobalamins. Plasma creatinine values measured within a week of measurements of plasma methylmalonic acid and plasma cobalamins were available for 1255 of the patients.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Predictors of variation in plasma methylmalonic acid; plasma cobalamins, plasma creatinine, age and sex.RESULTS: Plasma methylmalonic acid was positively correlated with plasma creatinine, even for plasma creatinine within the normal range. These associations remained in a multiple regression analysis. For plasma cobalamins below 200 pmol L-1, there was a strong negative correlation between plasma methylmalonic acid and plasma cobalamins, whilst the association was weak for higher plasma cobalamin levels. Plasma methylmalonic acid increased and plasma cobalamins decreased with age.CONCLUSIONS: The strong correlation between plasma methylmalonic acid and plasma creatinine suggests that plasma creatinine - also within the normal range - must be taken into consideration when interpreting plasma methylmalonic acid.

    KW - Adolescent

    KW - Adult

    KW - Aged

    KW - Aged, 80 and over

    KW - Biological Markers

    KW - Child

    KW - Child, Preschool

    KW - Creatinine

    KW - Cross-Sectional Studies

    KW - Female

    KW - Humans

    KW - Male

    KW - Methylmalonic Acid

    KW - Middle Aged

    KW - Reference Values

    KW - Sex Factors

    KW - Vitamin B 12 Deficiency

    M3 - Journal article

    VL - 247

    SP - 507

    EP - 512

    JO - Journal of Internal Medicine. Supplement

    JF - Journal of Internal Medicine. Supplement

    SN - 0955-7873

    IS - 4

    ER -