The longitudinal association between glycaemic control and health-related quality of life following insulin therapy optimisation in type 2 diabetes patients. A prospective observational study in secondary care

Tibor R S Hajós, F Pouwer, R de Grooth, F Holleman, Jos W R Twisk, M Diamant, Frank J Snoek

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

PURPOSE: To test whether improvement in glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA(1c)) as a marker of glycaemic control, following intensifying insulin therapy, is associated with improvements in HRQoL.

METHODS: Dutch sub-optimally controlled (HbA(1c) > 7%) type 2 diabetes patients (N = 447, mean age 59 ± 11) initiated insulin glargine therapy. Data were collected at baseline, 3 and 6 months, and included HbA(1c) and measures of HRQoL: diabetes symptom distress (Diabetes Symptom Checklist-revised; DSC-r), fear of hypoglycaemia (Hypoglycaemia Fear Survey; HFS-w) and emotional well-being (WHO-5 wellbeing index).

RESULTS: HbA(1c) decreased from 8.8 ± 1.4% to 8.0 ± 1.2% and 7.7 ± 1.3% at 3 and 6 months follow-up, respectively (P < 0.001), DSC-r score improved from 17.7 ± 14.7 to 14.3 ± 13.3 and 13.6 ± 13.3 (P < 0.001). HFS-w score did not significantly change. WHO-5 score increased from 56 ± 23 to 62 ± 23 and 65 ± 22 P < 0.001). A modest, significant association was found between HbA(1c) and WHO-5 score (B = -1.8, 95% CI: -2.7 to -0.8) and HbA1c and DSC-r score (B = 1.0, 95% CI: 0.4 to 1.6). No such association was found for HFS-w score.

CONCLUSIONS: An association between improvement in HbA(1c) by means of optimising insulin therapy and improvement in HRQoL in type 2 diabetes patients has been observed. A weak, yet significant longitudinal association was found between improved HbA(1c) and emotional well-being and diabetes symptom distress.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftQuality of Life Research
Vol/bind21
Udgave nummer8
Sider (fra-til)1359-1365
ISSN0962-9343
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2012
Udgivet eksterntJa

Fingeraftryk

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Quality of Life
Prospective Studies
Insulin
Hypoglycemia
Glycosylated Hemoglobin A
Checklist

Citer dette

@article{edfd3b04ffd64f4b9f7e29f70d0cb890,
title = "The longitudinal association between glycaemic control and health-related quality of life following insulin therapy optimisation in type 2 diabetes patients. A prospective observational study in secondary care",
abstract = "PURPOSE: To test whether improvement in glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA(1c)) as a marker of glycaemic control, following intensifying insulin therapy, is associated with improvements in HRQoL.METHODS: Dutch sub-optimally controlled (HbA(1c) > 7{\%}) type 2 diabetes patients (N = 447, mean age 59 ± 11) initiated insulin glargine therapy. Data were collected at baseline, 3 and 6 months, and included HbA(1c) and measures of HRQoL: diabetes symptom distress (Diabetes Symptom Checklist-revised; DSC-r), fear of hypoglycaemia (Hypoglycaemia Fear Survey; HFS-w) and emotional well-being (WHO-5 wellbeing index).RESULTS: HbA(1c) decreased from 8.8 ± 1.4{\%} to 8.0 ± 1.2{\%} and 7.7 ± 1.3{\%} at 3 and 6 months follow-up, respectively (P < 0.001), DSC-r score improved from 17.7 ± 14.7 to 14.3 ± 13.3 and 13.6 ± 13.3 (P < 0.001). HFS-w score did not significantly change. WHO-5 score increased from 56 ± 23 to 62 ± 23 and 65 ± 22 P < 0.001). A modest, significant association was found between HbA(1c) and WHO-5 score (B = -1.8, 95{\%} CI: -2.7 to -0.8) and HbA1c and DSC-r score (B = 1.0, 95{\%} CI: 0.4 to 1.6). No such association was found for HFS-w score.CONCLUSIONS: An association between improvement in HbA(1c) by means of optimising insulin therapy and improvement in HRQoL in type 2 diabetes patients has been observed. A weak, yet significant longitudinal association was found between improved HbA(1c) and emotional well-being and diabetes symptom distress.",
keywords = "Adaptation, Psychological, Blood Glucose, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Female, Health Status Indicators, Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated, Humans, Hypoglycemic Agents, Insulin, Male, Middle Aged, Netherlands, Prospective Studies, Psychometrics, Quality of Life, Stress, Psychological, Journal Article, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't",
author = "Haj{\'o}s, {Tibor R S} and F Pouwer and {de Grooth}, R and F Holleman and Twisk, {Jos W R} and M Diamant and Snoek, {Frank J}",
year = "2012",
doi = "10.1007/s11136-011-0051-0",
language = "English",
volume = "21",
pages = "1359--1365",
journal = "Quality of Life Research",
issn = "0962-9343",
publisher = "Springer",
number = "8",

}

The longitudinal association between glycaemic control and health-related quality of life following insulin therapy optimisation in type 2 diabetes patients. A prospective observational study in secondary care. / Hajós, Tibor R S; Pouwer, F; de Grooth, R; Holleman, F; Twisk, Jos W R; Diamant, M; Snoek, Frank J.

I: Quality of Life Research, Bind 21, Nr. 8, 2012, s. 1359-1365.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - The longitudinal association between glycaemic control and health-related quality of life following insulin therapy optimisation in type 2 diabetes patients. A prospective observational study in secondary care

AU - Hajós, Tibor R S

AU - Pouwer, F

AU - de Grooth, R

AU - Holleman, F

AU - Twisk, Jos W R

AU - Diamant, M

AU - Snoek, Frank J

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - PURPOSE: To test whether improvement in glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA(1c)) as a marker of glycaemic control, following intensifying insulin therapy, is associated with improvements in HRQoL.METHODS: Dutch sub-optimally controlled (HbA(1c) > 7%) type 2 diabetes patients (N = 447, mean age 59 ± 11) initiated insulin glargine therapy. Data were collected at baseline, 3 and 6 months, and included HbA(1c) and measures of HRQoL: diabetes symptom distress (Diabetes Symptom Checklist-revised; DSC-r), fear of hypoglycaemia (Hypoglycaemia Fear Survey; HFS-w) and emotional well-being (WHO-5 wellbeing index).RESULTS: HbA(1c) decreased from 8.8 ± 1.4% to 8.0 ± 1.2% and 7.7 ± 1.3% at 3 and 6 months follow-up, respectively (P < 0.001), DSC-r score improved from 17.7 ± 14.7 to 14.3 ± 13.3 and 13.6 ± 13.3 (P < 0.001). HFS-w score did not significantly change. WHO-5 score increased from 56 ± 23 to 62 ± 23 and 65 ± 22 P < 0.001). A modest, significant association was found between HbA(1c) and WHO-5 score (B = -1.8, 95% CI: -2.7 to -0.8) and HbA1c and DSC-r score (B = 1.0, 95% CI: 0.4 to 1.6). No such association was found for HFS-w score.CONCLUSIONS: An association between improvement in HbA(1c) by means of optimising insulin therapy and improvement in HRQoL in type 2 diabetes patients has been observed. A weak, yet significant longitudinal association was found between improved HbA(1c) and emotional well-being and diabetes symptom distress.

AB - PURPOSE: To test whether improvement in glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA(1c)) as a marker of glycaemic control, following intensifying insulin therapy, is associated with improvements in HRQoL.METHODS: Dutch sub-optimally controlled (HbA(1c) > 7%) type 2 diabetes patients (N = 447, mean age 59 ± 11) initiated insulin glargine therapy. Data were collected at baseline, 3 and 6 months, and included HbA(1c) and measures of HRQoL: diabetes symptom distress (Diabetes Symptom Checklist-revised; DSC-r), fear of hypoglycaemia (Hypoglycaemia Fear Survey; HFS-w) and emotional well-being (WHO-5 wellbeing index).RESULTS: HbA(1c) decreased from 8.8 ± 1.4% to 8.0 ± 1.2% and 7.7 ± 1.3% at 3 and 6 months follow-up, respectively (P < 0.001), DSC-r score improved from 17.7 ± 14.7 to 14.3 ± 13.3 and 13.6 ± 13.3 (P < 0.001). HFS-w score did not significantly change. WHO-5 score increased from 56 ± 23 to 62 ± 23 and 65 ± 22 P < 0.001). A modest, significant association was found between HbA(1c) and WHO-5 score (B = -1.8, 95% CI: -2.7 to -0.8) and HbA1c and DSC-r score (B = 1.0, 95% CI: 0.4 to 1.6). No such association was found for HFS-w score.CONCLUSIONS: An association between improvement in HbA(1c) by means of optimising insulin therapy and improvement in HRQoL in type 2 diabetes patients has been observed. A weak, yet significant longitudinal association was found between improved HbA(1c) and emotional well-being and diabetes symptom distress.

KW - Adaptation, Psychological

KW - Blood Glucose

KW - Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2

KW - Female

KW - Health Status Indicators

KW - Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated

KW - Humans

KW - Hypoglycemic Agents

KW - Insulin

KW - Male

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Netherlands

KW - Prospective Studies

KW - Psychometrics

KW - Quality of Life

KW - Stress, Psychological

KW - Journal Article

KW - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

U2 - 10.1007/s11136-011-0051-0

DO - 10.1007/s11136-011-0051-0

M3 - Journal article

VL - 21

SP - 1359

EP - 1365

JO - Quality of Life Research

JF - Quality of Life Research

SN - 0962-9343

IS - 8

ER -