The long-term programming effect of maternal 25-hydroxyvitamin D in pregnancy on allergic airway disease and lung function in offspring after 20 to 25 years of follow-up

Susanne Hansen, Ekaterina Maslova, Marin Strøm, Allan Linneberg, Thorhallur I Halldorsson, Charlotta Granström, Ronald Dahl, Hans Jürgen Hoffmann, Sjurdur F Olsen

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

BACKGROUND: High prenatal vitamin D status has been linked to decreased risk of atopic diseases in early childhood, but whether such relations persist until adulthood has not been explored.

OBJECTIVE: We sought to examine the association between maternal 25-hydryxovitamin D (25[OH]D) concentrations and outcomes of allergic airway disease and lung function in offspring with 20 to 25 years of follow-up.

METHODS: In a prospective birth cohort with 965 pregnant women enrolled in 1988-1989, maternal 25(OH)D concentrations were quantified in serum from gestational week 30 (n = 850 [88%]). Offspring were followed in nationwide registries with complete follow-up to the age of 25 years (n = 850 [100%]). Additionally, at age 20 years, outcomes of allergic airway disease and lung function were assessed in a subset of offspring by using blood samples and spirometry (n = 410 [45%]) and a questionnaire (n = 641 [70%]).

RESULTS: Exposure to a high maternal 25(OH)D concentration (≥125 nmol/L) was associated with an increased risk of asthma hospitalizations in offspring (hazard ratio [HR], 1.81; 95% CI, 0.78-4.16) during 25 years of follow-up compared with the reference group (75-<125 nmol/L). Furthermore, there were lower risks of asthma hospitalizations (HR, 0.29; 95% CI, 0.08-1.02) and asthma medication use (HR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.35-0.95) in those exposed to a low maternal 25(OH)D concentration (<50 nmol/L). In a reduced set of participants, we found no associations between maternal 25(OH)D concentrations and offspring allergen-specific IgE, total IgE, and eosinophil cationic protein levels; self-reported doctor's diagnosis of asthma or hay fever; or lung function at 20 years of age.

CONCLUSIONS: Our study does not provide support for a protective effect of a high maternal 25(OH)D concentration on outcomes of allergic airway disease and lung function at 20 to 25 years of age. In contrast, a high maternal 25(OH)D concentration might be associated with an increased risk of allergic diseases in offspring.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftJournal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Vol/bind136
Udgave nummer1
Sider (fra-til)169-176.e2
ISSN0091-6749
DOI
StatusUdgivet - jul. 2015

Fingeraftryk

Lung Diseases
Mothers
Eosinophil Cationic Protein
Seasonal Allergic Rhinitis
25-hydroxyvitamin D
Allergens
Registries
Pregnant Women
Lung
Serum

Citer dette

Hansen, Susanne ; Maslova, Ekaterina ; Strøm, Marin ; Linneberg, Allan ; Halldorsson, Thorhallur I ; Granström, Charlotta ; Dahl, Ronald ; Hoffmann, Hans Jürgen ; Olsen, Sjurdur F. / The long-term programming effect of maternal 25-hydroxyvitamin D in pregnancy on allergic airway disease and lung function in offspring after 20 to 25 years of follow-up. I: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. 2015 ; Bind 136, Nr. 1. s. 169-176.e2.
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title = "The long-term programming effect of maternal 25-hydroxyvitamin D in pregnancy on allergic airway disease and lung function in offspring after 20 to 25 years of follow-up",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: High prenatal vitamin D status has been linked to decreased risk of atopic diseases in early childhood, but whether such relations persist until adulthood has not been explored.OBJECTIVE: We sought to examine the association between maternal 25-hydryxovitamin D (25[OH]D) concentrations and outcomes of allergic airway disease and lung function in offspring with 20 to 25 years of follow-up.METHODS: In a prospective birth cohort with 965 pregnant women enrolled in 1988-1989, maternal 25(OH)D concentrations were quantified in serum from gestational week 30 (n = 850 [88{\%}]). Offspring were followed in nationwide registries with complete follow-up to the age of 25 years (n = 850 [100{\%}]). Additionally, at age 20 years, outcomes of allergic airway disease and lung function were assessed in a subset of offspring by using blood samples and spirometry (n = 410 [45{\%}]) and a questionnaire (n = 641 [70{\%}]).RESULTS: Exposure to a high maternal 25(OH)D concentration (≥125 nmol/L) was associated with an increased risk of asthma hospitalizations in offspring (hazard ratio [HR], 1.81; 95{\%} CI, 0.78-4.16) during 25 years of follow-up compared with the reference group (75-<125 nmol/L). Furthermore, there were lower risks of asthma hospitalizations (HR, 0.29; 95{\%} CI, 0.08-1.02) and asthma medication use (HR, 0.58; 95{\%} CI, 0.35-0.95) in those exposed to a low maternal 25(OH)D concentration (<50 nmol/L). In a reduced set of participants, we found no associations between maternal 25(OH)D concentrations and offspring allergen-specific IgE, total IgE, and eosinophil cationic protein levels; self-reported doctor's diagnosis of asthma or hay fever; or lung function at 20 years of age.CONCLUSIONS: Our study does not provide support for a protective effect of a high maternal 25(OH)D concentration on outcomes of allergic airway disease and lung function at 20 to 25 years of age. In contrast, a high maternal 25(OH)D concentration might be associated with an increased risk of allergic diseases in offspring.",
keywords = "Adult, Allergens, Asthma, Cohort Studies, Denmark, Eosinophil Cationic Protein, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Hospitalization, Humans, Immunoglobulin E, Lung, Male, Maternal Exposure, Pregnancy, Prospective Studies, Spirometry, Time Factors, Vitamin D, Young Adult",
author = "Susanne Hansen and Ekaterina Maslova and Marin Str{\o}m and Allan Linneberg and Halldorsson, {Thorhallur I} and Charlotta Granstr{\"o}m and Ronald Dahl and Hoffmann, {Hans J{\"u}rgen} and Olsen, {Sjurdur F}",
note = "Copyright {\circledC} 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.",
year = "2015",
month = "7",
doi = "10.1016/j.jaci.2014.12.1924",
language = "English",
volume = "136",
pages = "169--176.e2",
journal = "Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology",
issn = "0091-6749",
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The long-term programming effect of maternal 25-hydroxyvitamin D in pregnancy on allergic airway disease and lung function in offspring after 20 to 25 years of follow-up. / Hansen, Susanne; Maslova, Ekaterina; Strøm, Marin; Linneberg, Allan; Halldorsson, Thorhallur I; Granström, Charlotta; Dahl, Ronald; Hoffmann, Hans Jürgen; Olsen, Sjurdur F.

I: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Bind 136, Nr. 1, 07.2015, s. 169-176.e2.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - The long-term programming effect of maternal 25-hydroxyvitamin D in pregnancy on allergic airway disease and lung function in offspring after 20 to 25 years of follow-up

AU - Hansen, Susanne

AU - Maslova, Ekaterina

AU - Strøm, Marin

AU - Linneberg, Allan

AU - Halldorsson, Thorhallur I

AU - Granström, Charlotta

AU - Dahl, Ronald

AU - Hoffmann, Hans Jürgen

AU - Olsen, Sjurdur F

N1 - Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PY - 2015/7

Y1 - 2015/7

N2 - BACKGROUND: High prenatal vitamin D status has been linked to decreased risk of atopic diseases in early childhood, but whether such relations persist until adulthood has not been explored.OBJECTIVE: We sought to examine the association between maternal 25-hydryxovitamin D (25[OH]D) concentrations and outcomes of allergic airway disease and lung function in offspring with 20 to 25 years of follow-up.METHODS: In a prospective birth cohort with 965 pregnant women enrolled in 1988-1989, maternal 25(OH)D concentrations were quantified in serum from gestational week 30 (n = 850 [88%]). Offspring were followed in nationwide registries with complete follow-up to the age of 25 years (n = 850 [100%]). Additionally, at age 20 years, outcomes of allergic airway disease and lung function were assessed in a subset of offspring by using blood samples and spirometry (n = 410 [45%]) and a questionnaire (n = 641 [70%]).RESULTS: Exposure to a high maternal 25(OH)D concentration (≥125 nmol/L) was associated with an increased risk of asthma hospitalizations in offspring (hazard ratio [HR], 1.81; 95% CI, 0.78-4.16) during 25 years of follow-up compared with the reference group (75-<125 nmol/L). Furthermore, there were lower risks of asthma hospitalizations (HR, 0.29; 95% CI, 0.08-1.02) and asthma medication use (HR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.35-0.95) in those exposed to a low maternal 25(OH)D concentration (<50 nmol/L). In a reduced set of participants, we found no associations between maternal 25(OH)D concentrations and offspring allergen-specific IgE, total IgE, and eosinophil cationic protein levels; self-reported doctor's diagnosis of asthma or hay fever; or lung function at 20 years of age.CONCLUSIONS: Our study does not provide support for a protective effect of a high maternal 25(OH)D concentration on outcomes of allergic airway disease and lung function at 20 to 25 years of age. In contrast, a high maternal 25(OH)D concentration might be associated with an increased risk of allergic diseases in offspring.

AB - BACKGROUND: High prenatal vitamin D status has been linked to decreased risk of atopic diseases in early childhood, but whether such relations persist until adulthood has not been explored.OBJECTIVE: We sought to examine the association between maternal 25-hydryxovitamin D (25[OH]D) concentrations and outcomes of allergic airway disease and lung function in offspring with 20 to 25 years of follow-up.METHODS: In a prospective birth cohort with 965 pregnant women enrolled in 1988-1989, maternal 25(OH)D concentrations were quantified in serum from gestational week 30 (n = 850 [88%]). Offspring were followed in nationwide registries with complete follow-up to the age of 25 years (n = 850 [100%]). Additionally, at age 20 years, outcomes of allergic airway disease and lung function were assessed in a subset of offspring by using blood samples and spirometry (n = 410 [45%]) and a questionnaire (n = 641 [70%]).RESULTS: Exposure to a high maternal 25(OH)D concentration (≥125 nmol/L) was associated with an increased risk of asthma hospitalizations in offspring (hazard ratio [HR], 1.81; 95% CI, 0.78-4.16) during 25 years of follow-up compared with the reference group (75-<125 nmol/L). Furthermore, there were lower risks of asthma hospitalizations (HR, 0.29; 95% CI, 0.08-1.02) and asthma medication use (HR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.35-0.95) in those exposed to a low maternal 25(OH)D concentration (<50 nmol/L). In a reduced set of participants, we found no associations between maternal 25(OH)D concentrations and offspring allergen-specific IgE, total IgE, and eosinophil cationic protein levels; self-reported doctor's diagnosis of asthma or hay fever; or lung function at 20 years of age.CONCLUSIONS: Our study does not provide support for a protective effect of a high maternal 25(OH)D concentration on outcomes of allergic airway disease and lung function at 20 to 25 years of age. In contrast, a high maternal 25(OH)D concentration might be associated with an increased risk of allergic diseases in offspring.

KW - Adult

KW - Allergens

KW - Asthma

KW - Cohort Studies

KW - Denmark

KW - Eosinophil Cationic Protein

KW - Female

KW - Follow-Up Studies

KW - Hospitalization

KW - Humans

KW - Immunoglobulin E

KW - Lung

KW - Male

KW - Maternal Exposure

KW - Pregnancy

KW - Prospective Studies

KW - Spirometry

KW - Time Factors

KW - Vitamin D

KW - Young Adult

U2 - 10.1016/j.jaci.2014.12.1924

DO - 10.1016/j.jaci.2014.12.1924

M3 - Journal article

VL - 136

SP - 169-176.e2

JO - Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology

JF - Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology

SN - 0091-6749

IS - 1

ER -