The influence of psychiatric disorders on the course of lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and tuberculosis

Melina Gade Sikjær*, Anders Løkke, Ole Hilberg

*Kontaktforfatter for dette arbejde

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

BACKGROUND: This Danish study evaluated the association between psychiatric comorbidity and the course of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), lung cancer and tuberculosis (TB) of an entire nation.

METHODS: Data from the Danish National Patient Registry (1998-2009), material status, gender, educational level, comorbidities, age at diagnosis and death, medication, and causes of death were extracted from national databases. We identified 71,874 patients with COPD and found 32,282 with a pre-index psychiatric comorbidity, 20,787 patients with lung cancer and found 8406 with a pre-index psychiatric comorbidity, and 3495 patients with TB and found 797 with a pre-index psychiatric morbidity. Within the three groups we compared the patients with/without a pre-index psychiatric comorbidity.

RESULTS: We found a reduced survival in patients with COPD or TB and a pre-existing psychiatric comorbidity. For all three pulmonary diseases, we found significantly higher age (p < .001) at time of diagnosis, higher Deyo-Charlson Comorbidity Index (p < .001), and an overrepresentation of singles (p < .001) in patients with a psychiatric comorbidity. COPD and lung cancer patients with a psychiatric comorbidity were significantly overrepresented by women (p < .001). Patients with COPD and a psychiatric comorbidity died most frequently of lung cancer (24%). Advancing age and Deyo-Charlson index were associated with a higher mortality rate whereas being a woman and married/co-habiting yielded a lower mortality rate for patients with a psychiatric comorbidity.

CONCLUSION: To our knowledge, this is the first epidemiological study investigating the influence of a psychiatric comorbidity on the course of COPD, lung cancer and TB at a national level. Our results emphasize the importance of detecting these major respiratory diseases in patients with psychiatric comorbidities and intensifying the treatment and follow up of these patients.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftRespiratory Medicine
Vol/bind135
Sider (fra-til)35-41
ISSN0954-6111
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 1. feb. 2018

Fingeraftryk

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Comorbidity
Educational Status
Lung Diseases
Registries
Epidemiologic Studies
Cause of Death
Databases

Citer dette

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title = "The influence of psychiatric disorders on the course of lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and tuberculosis",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: This Danish study evaluated the association between psychiatric comorbidity and the course of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), lung cancer and tuberculosis (TB) of an entire nation.METHODS: Data from the Danish National Patient Registry (1998-2009), material status, gender, educational level, comorbidities, age at diagnosis and death, medication, and causes of death were extracted from national databases. We identified 71,874 patients with COPD and found 32,282 with a pre-index psychiatric comorbidity, 20,787 patients with lung cancer and found 8406 with a pre-index psychiatric comorbidity, and 3495 patients with TB and found 797 with a pre-index psychiatric morbidity. Within the three groups we compared the patients with/without a pre-index psychiatric comorbidity.RESULTS: We found a reduced survival in patients with COPD or TB and a pre-existing psychiatric comorbidity. For all three pulmonary diseases, we found significantly higher age (p < .001) at time of diagnosis, higher Deyo-Charlson Comorbidity Index (p < .001), and an overrepresentation of singles (p < .001) in patients with a psychiatric comorbidity. COPD and lung cancer patients with a psychiatric comorbidity were significantly overrepresented by women (p < .001). Patients with COPD and a psychiatric comorbidity died most frequently of lung cancer (24{\%}). Advancing age and Deyo-Charlson index were associated with a higher mortality rate whereas being a woman and married/co-habiting yielded a lower mortality rate for patients with a psychiatric comorbidity.CONCLUSION: To our knowledge, this is the first epidemiological study investigating the influence of a psychiatric comorbidity on the course of COPD, lung cancer and TB at a national level. Our results emphasize the importance of detecting these major respiratory diseases in patients with psychiatric comorbidities and intensifying the treatment and follow up of these patients.",
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The influence of psychiatric disorders on the course of lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and tuberculosis. / Sikjær, Melina Gade; Løkke, Anders; Hilberg, Ole.

I: Respiratory Medicine, Bind 135, 01.02.2018, s. 35-41.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - The influence of psychiatric disorders on the course of lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and tuberculosis

AU - Sikjær, Melina Gade

AU - Løkke, Anders

AU - Hilberg, Ole

PY - 2018/2/1

Y1 - 2018/2/1

N2 - BACKGROUND: This Danish study evaluated the association between psychiatric comorbidity and the course of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), lung cancer and tuberculosis (TB) of an entire nation.METHODS: Data from the Danish National Patient Registry (1998-2009), material status, gender, educational level, comorbidities, age at diagnosis and death, medication, and causes of death were extracted from national databases. We identified 71,874 patients with COPD and found 32,282 with a pre-index psychiatric comorbidity, 20,787 patients with lung cancer and found 8406 with a pre-index psychiatric comorbidity, and 3495 patients with TB and found 797 with a pre-index psychiatric morbidity. Within the three groups we compared the patients with/without a pre-index psychiatric comorbidity.RESULTS: We found a reduced survival in patients with COPD or TB and a pre-existing psychiatric comorbidity. For all three pulmonary diseases, we found significantly higher age (p < .001) at time of diagnosis, higher Deyo-Charlson Comorbidity Index (p < .001), and an overrepresentation of singles (p < .001) in patients with a psychiatric comorbidity. COPD and lung cancer patients with a psychiatric comorbidity were significantly overrepresented by women (p < .001). Patients with COPD and a psychiatric comorbidity died most frequently of lung cancer (24%). Advancing age and Deyo-Charlson index were associated with a higher mortality rate whereas being a woman and married/co-habiting yielded a lower mortality rate for patients with a psychiatric comorbidity.CONCLUSION: To our knowledge, this is the first epidemiological study investigating the influence of a psychiatric comorbidity on the course of COPD, lung cancer and TB at a national level. Our results emphasize the importance of detecting these major respiratory diseases in patients with psychiatric comorbidities and intensifying the treatment and follow up of these patients.

AB - BACKGROUND: This Danish study evaluated the association between psychiatric comorbidity and the course of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), lung cancer and tuberculosis (TB) of an entire nation.METHODS: Data from the Danish National Patient Registry (1998-2009), material status, gender, educational level, comorbidities, age at diagnosis and death, medication, and causes of death were extracted from national databases. We identified 71,874 patients with COPD and found 32,282 with a pre-index psychiatric comorbidity, 20,787 patients with lung cancer and found 8406 with a pre-index psychiatric comorbidity, and 3495 patients with TB and found 797 with a pre-index psychiatric morbidity. Within the three groups we compared the patients with/without a pre-index psychiatric comorbidity.RESULTS: We found a reduced survival in patients with COPD or TB and a pre-existing psychiatric comorbidity. For all three pulmonary diseases, we found significantly higher age (p < .001) at time of diagnosis, higher Deyo-Charlson Comorbidity Index (p < .001), and an overrepresentation of singles (p < .001) in patients with a psychiatric comorbidity. COPD and lung cancer patients with a psychiatric comorbidity were significantly overrepresented by women (p < .001). Patients with COPD and a psychiatric comorbidity died most frequently of lung cancer (24%). Advancing age and Deyo-Charlson index were associated with a higher mortality rate whereas being a woman and married/co-habiting yielded a lower mortality rate for patients with a psychiatric comorbidity.CONCLUSION: To our knowledge, this is the first epidemiological study investigating the influence of a psychiatric comorbidity on the course of COPD, lung cancer and TB at a national level. Our results emphasize the importance of detecting these major respiratory diseases in patients with psychiatric comorbidities and intensifying the treatment and follow up of these patients.

KW - COPD

KW - Lung cancer

KW - Psychiatric comorbidity

KW - Tuberculosis

KW - Lung Neoplasms/epidemiology

KW - Mental Disorders/complications

KW - Prognosis

KW - Comorbidity

KW - Humans

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Male

KW - Cause of Death/trends

KW - Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/epidemiology

KW - Denmark/epidemiology

KW - Survival Analysis

KW - Aged, 80 and over

KW - Female

KW - Aged

KW - Marital Status/statistics & numerical data

KW - Tuberculosis/epidemiology

U2 - 10.1016/j.rmed.2017.12.012

DO - 10.1016/j.rmed.2017.12.012

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 29414451

AN - SCOPUS:85040319227

VL - 135

SP - 35

EP - 41

JO - Respiratory Medicine

JF - Respiratory Medicine

SN - 0954-6111

ER -