The influence of hospital drug formulary policies on the prescribing patterns of proton pump inhibitors in primary care

Michael Due Larsen, Mette Schou, Anja Sparre Kristiansen, Jesper Hallas

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

AIM: This study had two aims: Firstly, to describe how prescriptions for proton pump inhibitor (PPI) in primary care were influenced by a change of the hospital drug policy, and secondly, to describe if a large discount on an expensive PPI (esomeprazole) to a hospital would influence prescribing patterns after discharge.

METHODS: This register study was conducted at Odense University Hospital, Denmark, and by use of pharmacy dispensing data and a hospital-based pharmacoepidemiological database, the medication regimens of patients were followed across hospitalisation. The influence of hospital drug policy on prescribings in primary care was measured by the likelihood of having a high-cost PPI prescribed before and after change of drug policy.

RESULTS: In total, 9,341 hospital stays in 2009 and 2010 were included. The probability of a patient to be prescribed an expensive PPI after discharge decreased from 33.5 to 9.4 %, corresponding to a risk ratio of 0.28. In primary care after discharge, 13.4 % of esomeprazole use was initiated in the hospital, and this was 8.4 % for PPIs in general. After the change of hospital drug policy, this decreased to 6.5 % for esomeprazole and increased for the recommended PPIs pantoprazole and lansoprazole to 14.6 and 26.1 %, respectively. The effect of a large discount on expensive PPI to hospital was 14.7 %, and this decreased to 2.6 % when coordinating drug policy in hospital and primary care.

CONCLUSION: The likelihood of having an expensive PPI prescribed after hospital stay decreased when coordinating drug policy and the influence of a large discount to hospital could be minimised.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftEuropean Journal of Clinical Pharmacology
Vol/bind70
Udgave nummer7
Sider (fra-til)859-865
ISSN0031-6970
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 27. apr. 2014

Fingeraftryk

Hospital Formularies
Primary Health Care
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Length of Stay
Denmark
Prescriptions
Odds Ratio
Databases

Citer dette

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title = "The influence of hospital drug formulary policies on the prescribing patterns of proton pump inhibitors in primary care",
abstract = "AIM: This study had two aims: Firstly, to describe how prescriptions for proton pump inhibitor (PPI) in primary care were influenced by a change of the hospital drug policy, and secondly, to describe if a large discount on an expensive PPI (esomeprazole) to a hospital would influence prescribing patterns after discharge.METHODS: This register study was conducted at Odense University Hospital, Denmark, and by use of pharmacy dispensing data and a hospital-based pharmacoepidemiological database, the medication regimens of patients were followed across hospitalisation. The influence of hospital drug policy on prescribings in primary care was measured by the likelihood of having a high-cost PPI prescribed before and after change of drug policy.RESULTS: In total, 9,341 hospital stays in 2009 and 2010 were included. The probability of a patient to be prescribed an expensive PPI after discharge decreased from 33.5 to 9.4 {\%}, corresponding to a risk ratio of 0.28. In primary care after discharge, 13.4 {\%} of esomeprazole use was initiated in the hospital, and this was 8.4 {\%} for PPIs in general. After the change of hospital drug policy, this decreased to 6.5 {\%} for esomeprazole and increased for the recommended PPIs pantoprazole and lansoprazole to 14.6 and 26.1 {\%}, respectively. The effect of a large discount on expensive PPI to hospital was 14.7 {\%}, and this decreased to 2.6 {\%} when coordinating drug policy in hospital and primary care.CONCLUSION: The likelihood of having an expensive PPI prescribed after hospital stay decreased when coordinating drug policy and the influence of a large discount to hospital could be minimised.",
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The influence of hospital drug formulary policies on the prescribing patterns of proton pump inhibitors in primary care. / Larsen, Michael Due; Schou, Mette; Kristiansen, Anja Sparre; Hallas, Jesper.

I: European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, Bind 70, Nr. 7, 27.04.2014, s. 859-865.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - The influence of hospital drug formulary policies on the prescribing patterns of proton pump inhibitors in primary care

AU - Larsen, Michael Due

AU - Schou, Mette

AU - Kristiansen, Anja Sparre

AU - Hallas, Jesper

PY - 2014/4/27

Y1 - 2014/4/27

N2 - AIM: This study had two aims: Firstly, to describe how prescriptions for proton pump inhibitor (PPI) in primary care were influenced by a change of the hospital drug policy, and secondly, to describe if a large discount on an expensive PPI (esomeprazole) to a hospital would influence prescribing patterns after discharge.METHODS: This register study was conducted at Odense University Hospital, Denmark, and by use of pharmacy dispensing data and a hospital-based pharmacoepidemiological database, the medication regimens of patients were followed across hospitalisation. The influence of hospital drug policy on prescribings in primary care was measured by the likelihood of having a high-cost PPI prescribed before and after change of drug policy.RESULTS: In total, 9,341 hospital stays in 2009 and 2010 were included. The probability of a patient to be prescribed an expensive PPI after discharge decreased from 33.5 to 9.4 %, corresponding to a risk ratio of 0.28. In primary care after discharge, 13.4 % of esomeprazole use was initiated in the hospital, and this was 8.4 % for PPIs in general. After the change of hospital drug policy, this decreased to 6.5 % for esomeprazole and increased for the recommended PPIs pantoprazole and lansoprazole to 14.6 and 26.1 %, respectively. The effect of a large discount on expensive PPI to hospital was 14.7 %, and this decreased to 2.6 % when coordinating drug policy in hospital and primary care.CONCLUSION: The likelihood of having an expensive PPI prescribed after hospital stay decreased when coordinating drug policy and the influence of a large discount to hospital could be minimised.

AB - AIM: This study had two aims: Firstly, to describe how prescriptions for proton pump inhibitor (PPI) in primary care were influenced by a change of the hospital drug policy, and secondly, to describe if a large discount on an expensive PPI (esomeprazole) to a hospital would influence prescribing patterns after discharge.METHODS: This register study was conducted at Odense University Hospital, Denmark, and by use of pharmacy dispensing data and a hospital-based pharmacoepidemiological database, the medication regimens of patients were followed across hospitalisation. The influence of hospital drug policy on prescribings in primary care was measured by the likelihood of having a high-cost PPI prescribed before and after change of drug policy.RESULTS: In total, 9,341 hospital stays in 2009 and 2010 were included. The probability of a patient to be prescribed an expensive PPI after discharge decreased from 33.5 to 9.4 %, corresponding to a risk ratio of 0.28. In primary care after discharge, 13.4 % of esomeprazole use was initiated in the hospital, and this was 8.4 % for PPIs in general. After the change of hospital drug policy, this decreased to 6.5 % for esomeprazole and increased for the recommended PPIs pantoprazole and lansoprazole to 14.6 and 26.1 %, respectively. The effect of a large discount on expensive PPI to hospital was 14.7 %, and this decreased to 2.6 % when coordinating drug policy in hospital and primary care.CONCLUSION: The likelihood of having an expensive PPI prescribed after hospital stay decreased when coordinating drug policy and the influence of a large discount to hospital could be minimised.

U2 - 10.1007/s00228-014-1681-2

DO - 10.1007/s00228-014-1681-2

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 24770928

VL - 70

SP - 859

EP - 865

JO - European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology

JF - European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology

SN - 0031-6970

IS - 7

ER -