The impact of vitamin D on fetal and neonatal lung maturation: a systematic review

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) are major complications to preterm birth. Hypovitaminosis D is prevalent in pregnancy. We systematically reviewed the evidence of the impact of vitamin D on lung development, surfactant synthesis, RDS and BPD searching PubMed, Embase and Cochrane databases with the terms vitamin D AND (surfactant OR lung maturation OR lung development OR respiratory distress syndrome OR fetal lung OR prematurity OR bronchopulmonary dysplasia). Three human studies, ten animal studies, two laboratory studies and one combined animal and laboratory study were included. Human evidence was sparse allowing no conclusions. BPD was not associated with vitamin D receptor (VDR) polymorphism in a fully adjusted analysis. Animal and laboratory studies showed substantial positive effects of vitamin D on the ATII cell, fibroblast proliferation, surfactant synthesis and alveolarization. These data support the hypothesis of hypovitaminosis D as a frequent, modifiable risk factor of RDS and BPD, which should be tested in RCTs on pregnant women, those with threatening preterm delivery, or in the preterm neonates. Future experimental and human studies should aim to identify optimal time windows, vitamin D doses and cut off levels for 25-hydroxyvitamin D in interventions against RDS, BPD and later adverse respiratory outcomes.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftAmerican Journal of Physiology: Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology
Vol/bind308
Udgave nummer7
Sider (fra-til) L587-L602
ISSN1040-0605
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 16. jan. 2015

Fingeraftryk

Lung
Calcitriol Receptors
Premature Birth
PubMed
Pregnant Women
Fibroblasts
Cell Proliferation
Newborn Infant
Databases

Citer dette

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title = "The impact of vitamin D on fetal and neonatal lung maturation: a systematic review",
abstract = "Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) are major complications to preterm birth. Hypovitaminosis D is prevalent in pregnancy. We systematically reviewed the evidence of the impact of vitamin D on lung development, surfactant synthesis, RDS and BPD searching PubMed, Embase and Cochrane databases with the terms vitamin D AND (surfactant OR lung maturation OR lung development OR respiratory distress syndrome OR fetal lung OR prematurity OR bronchopulmonary dysplasia). Three human studies, ten animal studies, two laboratory studies and one combined animal and laboratory study were included. Human evidence was sparse allowing no conclusions. BPD was not associated with vitamin D receptor (VDR) polymorphism in a fully adjusted analysis. Animal and laboratory studies showed substantial positive effects of vitamin D on the ATII cell, fibroblast proliferation, surfactant synthesis and alveolarization. These data support the hypothesis of hypovitaminosis D as a frequent, modifiable risk factor of RDS and BPD, which should be tested in RCTs on pregnant women, those with threatening preterm delivery, or in the preterm neonates. Future experimental and human studies should aim to identify optimal time windows, vitamin D doses and cut off levels for 25-hydroxyvitamin D in interventions against RDS, BPD and later adverse respiratory outcomes.",
author = "Sine Lykkedegn and Sorensen, {Grith Lykke} and Beck-Nielsen, {Signe Sparre} and Christesen, {Henrik Boye Thybo}",
note = "Copyright {\circledC} 2014, American Journal of Physiology - Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology.",
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T1 - The impact of vitamin D on fetal and neonatal lung maturation

T2 - a systematic review

AU - Lykkedegn, Sine

AU - Sorensen, Grith Lykke

AU - Beck-Nielsen, Signe Sparre

AU - Christesen, Henrik Boye Thybo

N1 - Copyright © 2014, American Journal of Physiology - Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology.

PY - 2015/1/16

Y1 - 2015/1/16

N2 - Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) are major complications to preterm birth. Hypovitaminosis D is prevalent in pregnancy. We systematically reviewed the evidence of the impact of vitamin D on lung development, surfactant synthesis, RDS and BPD searching PubMed, Embase and Cochrane databases with the terms vitamin D AND (surfactant OR lung maturation OR lung development OR respiratory distress syndrome OR fetal lung OR prematurity OR bronchopulmonary dysplasia). Three human studies, ten animal studies, two laboratory studies and one combined animal and laboratory study were included. Human evidence was sparse allowing no conclusions. BPD was not associated with vitamin D receptor (VDR) polymorphism in a fully adjusted analysis. Animal and laboratory studies showed substantial positive effects of vitamin D on the ATII cell, fibroblast proliferation, surfactant synthesis and alveolarization. These data support the hypothesis of hypovitaminosis D as a frequent, modifiable risk factor of RDS and BPD, which should be tested in RCTs on pregnant women, those with threatening preterm delivery, or in the preterm neonates. Future experimental and human studies should aim to identify optimal time windows, vitamin D doses and cut off levels for 25-hydroxyvitamin D in interventions against RDS, BPD and later adverse respiratory outcomes.

AB - Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) are major complications to preterm birth. Hypovitaminosis D is prevalent in pregnancy. We systematically reviewed the evidence of the impact of vitamin D on lung development, surfactant synthesis, RDS and BPD searching PubMed, Embase and Cochrane databases with the terms vitamin D AND (surfactant OR lung maturation OR lung development OR respiratory distress syndrome OR fetal lung OR prematurity OR bronchopulmonary dysplasia). Three human studies, ten animal studies, two laboratory studies and one combined animal and laboratory study were included. Human evidence was sparse allowing no conclusions. BPD was not associated with vitamin D receptor (VDR) polymorphism in a fully adjusted analysis. Animal and laboratory studies showed substantial positive effects of vitamin D on the ATII cell, fibroblast proliferation, surfactant synthesis and alveolarization. These data support the hypothesis of hypovitaminosis D as a frequent, modifiable risk factor of RDS and BPD, which should be tested in RCTs on pregnant women, those with threatening preterm delivery, or in the preterm neonates. Future experimental and human studies should aim to identify optimal time windows, vitamin D doses and cut off levels for 25-hydroxyvitamin D in interventions against RDS, BPD and later adverse respiratory outcomes.

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